Autumn Quarter | Spring Quarter | Summer Quarter | September

Friday Harbor Laboratories

All UW marine biology students are encouraged to spend a quarter of study at Friday Harbor Laboratories (FHL) our marine station north of Seattle on San Juan Island. FHL offers research intensive programs spring through autumn quarters. Students live on-site in the dormitories for 10-week spring or autumn programs, 8-10 week summer internships, or 5-week summer course sessions. FHL also accepts students world-wide from any institution to their programs.

FHL is an ideal place to jump-start a career in the marine sciences. Located on a 480-acre biological reserve, FHL has access to marine habitats representative of cool-temperate marine habitats widely distributed throughout the world. All courses involve fieldwork, boats, laboratory work, and research mentorship from award-winning faculty. Course topics and research focus on local habitats, flora, and fauna. Opportunities for SCUBA diving also are available.

The following are brief descriptions of current FHL programs by quarter and some ideas of how you can use these programs toward a marine biology minor. Most FHL programs also can count for any UW biological and environmental science major requirements. Please contact marbiol@uw.edu for more information about how FHL programs work with particular UW degrees. Visit FHL's website for cost and application information.

 

Autumn Quarter

Marine Biology & Humanities Quarter

fhllabsThis quarter provides students with a panoramic cross-disciplinary narrative of current problems facing oceans and humans. This program includes field and lab courses in marine biology, as well as literature and creative writing classes inspired by marine biology, the local environment, and literature of the sea. No natural science background is required or recommended.

For this program, students take three classes from:

Read about a student's experience in the Marine Biology Quarter.

Degree Requirements

This quarter is great for sophomores through seniors and helps with the degree requirements of:

 

The Pelagic Ecosystem Function Apprenticeship

Students in this apprenticeship look at the complex physical-biological relationships in the open waters (pelagic ecosystem) around the San Juan Islands. Students build on the work of past apprenticeships, exploring the causes for abundance and distribution of pelagic marine life. This study is important because it tracks long-term changes in populations of plankton, fish, seabirds, and marine mammals in one of the areas judged most highly sensitive to climate change.

Read about a student's experience in the Pelagic Ecosystem Functionn Apprenticeship.

Minor Requirements

squidThis quarter is great for juniors and seniors. Depending the topics of their research projects, marine biology minors can use this program for a combination of three of these minor requirements:

 

Beam Reach Program

squidAt Beam Reach, a FHL partnering program, students study the southern resident killer whales (orcas), their marine environment, and what it will take to save them.  The program uses bioacoustic methods to explore conservation questions.  Students live on the Beam Reach sailboat and in the FHL dormitories.

Minor Requirements

Marine biology minors can use 10 credits from this program that count toward:

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Spring Quarter

Marine Zoology, Botany, and Genomics Quarter

Students in this program take from 14-16 credits from this list of courses:

This quarter consists of a list of classes students can choose from, including three lecture, laboratory, and field courses that:

In addition, the two research apprenticeships connect students with current research projects where they work under faculty mentorship to complete a research experiment, paper, and presentation.

Read about a student's experience in the Marine Zoology & Botany Quarter.

Minor Requirements

squidThis quarter works well for advanced sophomores through seniors. Marine biology minors often use this program for these minor requirements:

 

Ocean Acidification Research Apprenticeship

Students will participate in an ocean acidification mesocosm experiment. Mesocosm are plastic enclosures filled with seawater off the FHL docks and are used to run the experiments. The lead instructor is James Murray (UW Ocean). Each student will help with design and conducting the overall sampling but will have their own specific research topic in microbiology (w/ Bob Morris, UW Ocean), phytoplankton (w/Robin Kodner, WWU, Ocean) or zooplankton (w/ Evelyn Lessard, UW Ocean). Students will also learn the chemical basics (calculation and analytical methods) of the ocean carbonate system. There will be class lectures and discussions on the chemical and biological basics of previous mesocosm experiments, including the previous experiment at FHL in April 2012. There will be field trips to the impacted shellfish industry. Guest lectures will provide societal relevance. A final oral and written report will include the methods used, data obtained and what they mean. (15 credits)

Minor Requirements

This quarter works well for advanced sophomores through seniors. Depending on the topic of their research projects, marine biology minors can use this program for these minor requirements:

Marine Sedimentary Processes Apprenticeship: Elwha River Dam Removal Impacts

squidStudents work with UW Oceanographers to examine the impacts on the coastal and marine ecosystems from removing two dams from the Elwha River, the biggest watershed on the Olympic Peninsula. The dams are scheduled to be removed during 2011 with the goal of habitat restoration.  However, we do not yet understand the full range of effects that “restoration” will have. Apprentices explore the effects of the added sediment discharge in high quantities during dam removal near the mouths of rivers. (15 credits)

Minor Requirements

This quarter works well for advanced sophomores through seniors. Depending on the topic of their research projects, marine biology minors can use this program for these minor requirements:

 

Beam Reach Program

fhllabsAt Beam Reach, a FHL partnering program, students study the southern resident killer whales (orcas), their marine environment, and what it will take to save them.  The program uses bioacoustic methods to explore conservation questions.  Students live on the Beam Reach sailboat and in the FHL dormitories.

Minor Requirements

Marine biology minors can use 10 credits of this program that count toward:

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Summer Quarter

Marine Biology Courses

squidSummer courses at FHL are ideal for graduate and advanced undergraduate students seeking advanced practical courses on specific topics in marine biology. All summer courses run for five-weeks and are nine credits.  Most are intended for graduate students, not listed here, but interested advanced undergraduates are encouraged to apply. This summer FHL undergraduate courses include:

Read about a student's experience in a summer course.

Minor Requirements

Marine biology minors can use these classes for nine credits that count toward:

 

Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU)

fhllabsThis program links REU fellows with marine scientists in a 1:1 research experience.  The program will incorporate workshops, seminars and training sessions in addition to hands-on research. As the research progresses, fellows will be encouraged to become semi-independent collaborators. Research projects are designed by the scientists to be achievable projects which dovetail with their research plans.  REU fellows live at FHL and are provided a stipend for their work. 

 

Blinks Research Fellowship Program

squidThis 8-10 week summer undergraduate internship program is a full immersion research experience for motivated undergraduates, post-baccalaureates, and graduate students.  The fellowship targets groups who are historically underrepresented in the marine sciences.  Fellow work one on one with faculty and receive a stipend for their work.

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September

Scientific Diving Course

fhllabsThis non-credit, 9-day short course begins with a standard check-out dive and includes all the components required to achieve current scientific diving status with AAUS (the American Academy of Underwater Scientists, see www.aaus.org for more information) and the University of Washington.  

Students who take this course are encouraged to consider the Marine Biology & Social Science Quarter and the Spatial Ecology of Salish Sea Benthos as fall quarter options. Scientific diving students can request to do some diving for their apprenticeships in these programs.

 

Photos from top: FHL facilities by Whitney Grover; FHL dock by Whitney Grover; Taylor Jang on FHL boat from Taylor Jang; Crab by Ross Whippo; Pelagic apprentices by Emily Beyer; Pelagic apprentice labeling samples by Emily Beyer; Benthic canyon by H. Gary Greene; Orca from Beam Reach; Sea palms by Thomas Pool; Anemones by Thomas Pool; Urchins by Billie Swalla; Students on beach from FHL; Orcas by Frances Robertson; Purple sea stars from Marine Biology Quarter blog; Gulls from Marine Biology Quarter Blog; Blinks fellow from FHL; Divers from Kevin Turner

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