Core Marine Biology MinorMarine Biology TeachingEmeritus/Retired

UW faculty, scientists, and staff studying marine biology come from diverse backgrounds and work in disciplines all over campus. These short biographies introduce the range and scope of research interests, projects, and perspectives that our marine biologists explore.

Core Marine Biology Minor Faculty

Emily CarringtonEmily Carrington
Associate Professor, Biology, Friday Harbor Laboratories
Website

Emily Carrington investigates the physiological ecology of marine organisms. She is particularly interested in the functional design of organisms that inhabit physically demanding environments, such as wave-swept rocky shores, where thermal, osmotic, and hydrodynamic conditions can be extreme. Her research involves both plants and animals and spans many levels of biological organization, from the mechanics of biological materials, to the persistence of populations, to the characterization of the physical environment and how it influences biological processes. 

Tim EssingtonTim Essington
Associate Professor, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

Tim Essington is interested in food web interactions involving fish in marine, estuarine, and freshwater habitats. Specific topics of research interest include: analysis of tropical tunas, sharks, and fisheries in the central Pacific, analysis of cod and clupeid dynamics in the Baltic Sea, understanding spatial scales of trophic interactions along continental shelf ecosystems, and identifying trophically mediated trade-offs between fisheries. 

Carolyn FriedmanCarolyn Friedman
Associate Professor, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

Carolyn Friedman is interested in the health of marine and freshwater shellfish. Her lab participates in collaborative research that focuses on the investigation of infectious and non-infectious diseases of wild and cultured marine invertebrates and in ecosystem health: population dynamics, genetics and restoration. Specific topics of research interest include: disease and genetic interactions between wild and cultured geoducks, population dynamics and restoration of the Pinto abalone, summer mortality and herpes virus infections of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Her lab is also currently developing tools to control and diagnose Withering Syndrome in abalone and is investigating the development of resistance to Withering Syndrome in California abalones, Haliotis spp. Her lab has begun to develop molecular tools (quantitative PCR)to aid in the investigation of the role of pathogens impacting Bering Sea animals (Hematodinium in Tanner and Snow crabs and Ichthyophonus in Pollock). Finally her lab is examining possible etiologies of recent marked declines in freshwater mussels in King County. 

Evelyn LessardEvelyn J. Lessard
Associate Professor, Oceanography
Website

Evelyn Lessard is interested in microzooplankton ecology. Specific topics of research interest include: ecology and physiology of heterotrophic dinoflagellates, oceanic and coastal microbial food web dynamics, role of protists in bioremediation in sediments, and immunofluorescent probes for tracing trophic transfers.

Jan NewtonJan Newton
Principle Oceanographer, Applied Physics Lab
Website

Jan Newton is interested in the production and export of organic material in marine systems. Specific topics of interest include: food-web and seasonal effects in marine systems, the use of chlorophyll and degradation pigments as tracers of material flux, estuarine/coastal dynamics and marine water quality issues, and the effect of climate and ENSO

Julia ParrishJulia Parrish
Professor/Associate Director, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

Julia Parrish is interested in behavior of organisms living in groups (like schools of fish and colonially nesting seabirds), seabird ecology, and marine conservation. She is also involved in a number of projects including the COASST citizen science project dedicated to involving volunteers in the collection of high quality data on the status and trends of coastal resources. 

Gabrielle RocapGabrielle Rocap
Associate Professor, Oceanography
Website

Gabrielle Rocap is interested in the ecology and evolution of marine cyanobacteria. Her specific areas of research interest include: genetic diversity and ecotype distributions in coastal and open ocean cyanobacterial populations, comparative genomics of Prochlorococcus, transcriptional profiling and genomic analysis using microarrays.

Jennifer RuesinkJennifer Ruesink
Associate Professor, Biology
Website

Jennifer Ruesink is interested in using experiments to reveal mechanisms underlying biotic patterns based on understanding humanity's impacts on the global ecosystem. Specific topics of research interest include exploring thresholds in species interactions, introduced species, and biological diversity and ecosystem functioning.

Richard StrathmannBillie Swalla
Professor, Biology
Website

Billie Swalla's research is focused on a complex, interdisciplinary biological question. When and how did chordates evolve? Her research suggests that our earliest ancestors were worms, living in the mud and eating plankton and detritus. These worms also filtered water for plankton and probably also for oxygen. The closest living representatives of these ancestors are hemichordates, marine worms that are related to the better known echinoderms, such as sea stars and sea urchins. Echinoderms and hemichordate worms have similar embryonic development and become ciliated larvae, which float and feed in the plankton. However, after metamorphosis, echinoderms have a hard, spiny endoskeleton and are bottom dwellers, while the soft-bodied hemichordates burrow into the marine sand or mud. Her research compares the genes and genomes of these invertebrates, which are related to us. We look at similarities as a way of telling which groups are related to the other groups, and examine the expression of homologous genes in order to see how genes may be used in a similar way, or co-opted for different functions. These questions do have relevance for human health and development because echinoderms and hemichordates are able to do remarkable adult regeneration

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Marine Biology Teaching Faculty

Virginia ArmbrustE. Virginia Armbrust
Professor, Oceanography
Website

Virginia Armbrust is interested in the behavior and growth of phytoplankton populations in dynamic environments. Currently, there are five ongoing research projects in her lab: genetic and physiological diversity in field populations of the centric diatom (Ditylum brightwellii), sexual reproduction in the centric diatom (Thalassiosira weissflogii), photorespiration in diatoms, response of bacteria to organic compounds excreted by diatoms, and genetic and physiological diversity with eukaryotic nanoplankton. 

David ArmstrongDavid A. Armstrong
Professor, Director, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

David Armstrong is interested in predicting possible deleterious effects of development, such as dredging, oil exploration, and materials disposal, on crustacean populations. Specific topics of research interest include: population dynamics and production, spatial and temporal distribution, habitat requirements, reproductive cycles, feeding strategies, energetic requirements, and toxicant effects as gauged by some of these factors on crabs and shrimp. His lab also studies the importance of major coastal estuaries to early juvenile stages of Dungeness crab, Cancer magister, that enter as megalopae and metamorphose on a variety of substrates. 

John BarossJohn A. Baross
Professor, Oceanography
Website

John Baross is interested in the field of biological oceanography. Specific topics of research interest include: thermophilic microorganisms from volcanic environments, the origin and evolution of life and life on other planets and moons, and microbial ecology of the Columbia River estuary. 

Dave BeauchampDavid A. Beauchamp
Professor, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

David Beauchamp is interested in basic and applied questions that link individual behavior to community-level processes influencing the structure and function of aquatic food webs. Specific topics of research interest include: aquatic community ecology, food web modeling, native-nonnative interactions, behavior, population assessment, bioenergetics modeling, and hydroacoustics.

Dee BoersmaP. Dee Boersma
Professor, Biology
Website

Dee Boersma is interested in ecology and conservation biology. Specific topics of research interest include: how seabirds balance different selective forces, respond to environmental variability, and how they can be used as reflectors of environmental change. Her lab uses satellite telemetry to determine the foraging area of Magellanic and Rockhopper penguins in Argentina and the Falkland Islands. The lab focuses on identifying places of particular importance in the protection of these birds.

Rose Ann CattolicoRose Ann Cattolico
Professor, Biology; Adjunct Professor, Oceanography
Website

Rose Ann Cattolico is interested in understanding the evolution and function of the chloroplast genomes in rhodophytic (red), chromophytic (green), and chromophytic (brown) algae. Specific topics of research interest include: analysis of the evolution and phylogeny of the chloroplast genomes via sequence analysis of an array of chloroplast genes, determination of the effect of environmental cues (e.g. light quality and quantity) on chloroplast genes, extension of the database for chloroplast genome structure of marine plants, research on the mechanisms of signal transduction including characterizing a protein encoded in the chloroplast which is a member of the "Response Regulator" superfamily of transcriptional regulator proteins, and research on the Calvin Cycle enzyme, phosphoribulokinase (PRK). 

Jody DemingJody Deming
Professor, Oceanography
Website

Jody Deming is interested in understanding how microbes - bacteria and archaea - manage to survive, grow, and reproduce under extreme conditions, focusing recently on adaptations and evolutionary processes in very cold saline ice formations. Ongoing projects address the various roles of extracellular enzymes, exopolymeric substances, and viruses in determining microbial life in ice (or in the cold source waters or sediments prior to freezing), whether the ice is natural sea ice, artificial ice made under controlled conditions or hypothesized sites for life on icy moons and planets in our solar system. 

Megan DethierMegan N. Dethier
Research Professor, Biology, Friday Harbor Laboratories
Website

Megan Dethier is interested in marine ecology, especially the ecology of shorelines. Specific topics of interest are: plant-herbivore interactions, especially the roles of algal functional morphology, chemical defenses, and ecological refuges; the effects of intertidal stresses (e.g., desiccation) on energy allocation patterns in intertidal algae - how algae make "decisions" when stressed about how to allocate energy between growth, reproduction, and defense; the classification, long-term monitoring, and maintenance of biodiversity of intertidal habitats. She also is interested in invertebrate functional morphology, especially morphological features that confer resistance to predators. 

Vince GallucciVincent F. Gallucci
Professor, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

Vincent Gallucci is interested in examining the last decade of conservation, management, and population dynamics of elasmobranchs, especially sharks. Specific topics or research interest include: dynamics of benthic populations such as bivalves and crustaceans, mathematical methods consisting of dynamical systems and statistical analyses applied via modeling and risk analyses, and natural resource conflict resolution. 

Danny GrunbaumDaniel Grünbaum
Associate Professor, Oceanography
Website

Daniel Grünbaum is interested in a cross-disciplinary array of scientific approaches from population biology, behavioral ecology, mathematical biology, biomechanics, and fluid dynamics. Specific topics of research interest include: quantitative relationships between short-term, small-scale processes, such as individual movement behaviors, and their long-term, large-scale population level effects, such as population fluxes and distributions. 

Lorenz HauserLorenz Hauser
Associate Professor, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

Lorenz Hauser is interested in the application of molecular markers to problems in ecology and evolutionary biology. Specific topics of research interest include: anthropogenic disturbance exploitation and pollution as evolutionary model systems, introduced species, fisheries genetics, conservation genetics, and genetic structure within populations.

James HaJames Ha
Research Associate Professor, Psychology
Website

James Ha is interested in the social behavior of highly cognitive animals. He has ongoing research efforts in two areas: 1) primate development, behavior, and reproduction, and 2) behavioral ecology and foraging behavior of corvids (crows). In addition, he has recently developed a research program in orca social organization. 

herbertSteve Herbert
Professor, Geography and Law, Societies, and Justice
Website

Steve Herbert is interested in the mobilization of law to help protect endangered marine species.  His current project examines the political, economic and cultural issues that emerge from the use of the Endangered Species Act to assist the Southern Resident Killer Whales, who inhabit the Salish Sea for much of the year and are the focal point of a large whale watching industry. 

Russ HerwigRussell P. Herwig
Research Associate Professor, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

Russell Herwig is interested in the microbiology of aquatic environments. Specific topics of research interest include: ballast water and control of introduction of non-indigenous species, microbiology of contaminated groundwater, and microbiology of larval fish. His lab has also participated for nearly 10 years on a bioremediation related project focused on the aerobic and anaerobic transformation of chlorinated solvents and the identification of microorganisms capable of transforming these contaminants. 

Ray HilbornRay Hilborn
Professor, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

Ray Hilborn is interested in fisheries population dynamics and management, natural resource conservation, and fishery resources management of the west coast of the U. S., Canada, New Zealand, and Australia. Specific topics of research interest include: explicit spatial modeling of populations, design of adaptive management systems for natural resources, the behavior and dynamics of fishing fleets, relating models to data using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods, fisheries stock assessment and population viability analysis. His also has major projects on salmon in Western Alaska, salmon and marine fishes on the west coast of the lower 48 states, and stock assessments and marine mammal interactions in New Zealand marine fisheries. 

John HorneJohn K. Horne
Research Associate Professor, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

John Horne is interested in three distinct but related areas: scale-dependent processes influencing aquatic organism distributions, predator-prey interactions and the application of acoustics to aquatic ecology and resource management. Specific topics or research interest include: spatial and temporal patchiness of organism distributions, spectral analysis and bioenergetic models to examine predator and prey interactions, and fish distribution/abundance data sampling using scientific echosounders in an attempt to compare predictions from morphologically based acoustic models to laboratory and field measurements. 

Claire Horner-DevineM. Claire Horner-Devine
Assistant Professor, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

Claire Horner-Devine is interested in understanding the primary factors affecting species’ distribution and maintenance of biological diversity. She is also interested in how anthropogenic activities influence natural communities and ecosystem processes. Her focus is on the distribution of microbial communities and their influence on ecosystem processes. She addresses questions regarding spatial and temporal patterns of the microbial diversity and community composition and feedbacks with nutrient cycling and other organisms. Current work is focused on microbes in Hood Canal, WA, as well as the impacts of an invasive eelgrass on sediment processes and communities in Padilla Bay, WA. 

George HuntGeorge L. Hunt
Research Professor, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

George Hunt’s research focuses on the ecology and behavior of marine birds and how spatial and temporal variability in marine ecosystems, at a variety of scales, influence marine bird foraging opportunities and reproductive performance. For successful and profitable foraging, many marine birds require concentrations of prey much greater than the overall average. A second facet of his research interests focuses on ecosystem-level investigations of spatial and temporal variability in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands marine ecosystems. In these collaborative, interdisciplinary studies, he and his colleagues have investigated the causes of the spatial heterogeneity in the distribution, abundance, and foraging ecology of marine birds in the Aleutian Archipelago. An off-shoot of these studies has been the development of national and international programs for the investigation of how climate variability and warming may affect the sub-arctic seas. 

Deborah KelleyDeborah Kelley
Professor, Oceanography
Website

Deborah Kelley is a marine geologist interested in understanding how submarine volcanoes and rock alteration processes support life in the absence of sunlight. She is also interested in how the concentrations and compositions of volcanic gases change as magmas deep within the seafloor cool, and how these gases are transported to the seafloor. Field areas that her work is currently focusing on include the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, the accretionary margin off of Vancouver Island, and the Lost City hydrothermal field at 30°N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In addition to these areas, she also is developing an in-situ microbial incubator for black smoker systems that is designed to establish the upper temperature limit to life.

Rick KeilRick Keil
Associate Professor, Oceanography
Website

Rick Keil studies preservation and degradation of organic compounds in aquatic environments, global carbon cycles, microbial processes that lead to organic matter burial or preservation, sorptive processes between organics and mineral surfaces, and application of flow-based separation techniques to process and study individual components of complex mixtures.

Karl BanseJulie Keister
Assistant Professor, Oceanography
Website

Julie Keister’s research focuses on the physical and biological processes that effect abundances and distributions of zooplankton in coastal ecosystems. She works on interdisciplinary projects using a combination of field collections, satellite data, and laboratory experiments to examine physical and biological patterns. Specific topics of interest or research include: basin-scale links between physical dynamics (winds, circulation, stratification) and zooplankton populations in the Pacific Ocean, effects of dissolved oxygen concentration on distributions of zooplankton in Puget Sound, Washington, and the role of mesoscale circulation features in the cross-shelf flux of carbon in coastal upwelling areas.

David KimmelmanDavid Kimelman
Adjunct Professor, Biochemistry
Website

David Kimelman is interested in the intercellular signals involved in early vertebrate development. Specific topics of research interest include: understanding the role of each intercellular signaling factor in specifying cell fate in the early frog and fish embryo and intracellular signaling pathways involving signaling factors that are likely to have a major role in dividing the early embryo into regions with distinct cellular identities.

Terrie KlingerTerrie Klinger
Associate Professor, Marine Affairs
Website

Terrie Klinger is interested in the application of genetic, population, and ecosystem-based studies to marine environmental decision-making. Specific topics of research interest include: population biology and ecology of kelps and other seaweeds, effects of global change on early development in seaweeds, ecological impacts and recovery from the Exxon Valdez and other oil spills, effects of thermal discharge into the marine environment, biosafety assessment of engineered genes in the environment, and implementation of marine protected areas. 

Marv LilleyMarvin D. Lilley
Professor, Oceanography
Website

Marvin Lilley is interested in both chemical and biological oceanography. Specific areas of research interest include: chemistry and microbiology of hydrothermal systems as they relate to volatiles, development of instruments for use in hydrothermal systems, and biogeochemical cycles of H2 and CH4 in aquatic environments. 

Claudia MillsClaudia E. Mills
Affiliate Professor, Biology, Friday Harbor Laboratories
Website

Claudia Mills is interested in gelatinous zooplankton and ocean conservation. Specific topics or research interest include: collaborative fieldwork working toward a global sense of the biology, ecology, biodiversity, and evolution of medusae and ctenophores. She also studies the impacts of alien marine species in near shore ecosystems.

Bob MorrisRobert Morris
Assistant Professor, Oceanography
Website

My laboratory uses cultivation, genomic, and proteomic approaches to study relationships between biogeochemical cycles and microbial processes in the oceans. We are specifically interested in exploring the diversity and metabolism of dominant uncultured bacterioplankton.

Patricia MorseM. Patricia Morse
Visiting Professor, Biology

M. Patricia Morse is interested in molluscan biology and science education. Specific topics of research interest include: microscopic analysis (transmission and scanning electron and confocal microscopy) of the bivalve heart-kidney system as well as molluscan meiofaunal ecology and systematics studies. She currently serves as Principal Investigator for the Independent College Office on an NSF K-12 Partnership project and chairs a National Academies of Sciences NRC Committee on Attracting Science and Mathematics PhDs to K-12 Education.

Kerry NaishKerry Naish
Associate Professor, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

Kerry Naish’s research group works to characterize the evolutionary responses of aquatic animals to natural and anthropogenic influences, and to develop predictive approaches that can be used to describe these responses. Most fitness traits that are related to the long-term viability and persistence of populations are encoded by a number of genes that interact with each other, and are influenced by the environment. Thus, she uses a combination of molecular and quantitative genetic approaches to describe trait variation and to track changes in these traits. Most of her research is conducted on anadromous Pacific salmon, because each species has developed a diverse set of life history strategies that are suited to the broad range environments in which they spawn, develop and migrate. Her research has implications for the conservation and management of fish populations, because we need to understand how these populations will respond to a changing environment.

Ted PietschTheodore W. Pietsch
Professor and Curator of Fishes, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences & Burke Museum
Website

Ted Pietsch is interested primarily in marine ichthyology, especially the biosystematics, zoogeography, and behavior of deep-sea fishes. He also has published extensively in the history of ichthyology. A specific topic of research interest is the reproductive biology of deep-sea ceratoid anglerfishes. As curator of the UW Fish Collection (www.UWFishCollection.org), he is also interested in biotic survey and inventory, having conducted a long series of expeditions to collect plants and animals in the Russian Far East.

Andre PuntAndré E. Punt
Professor, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

Andre Punt is interested in biomathematics, multispecies modeling, population dynamics, and stock assessment. Specific topics of research interest include: developing new methods for assessing fish and marine mammal populations, evaluating the performance of existing methods for assessing and managing renewable resource populations, and Bayesian assessment and risk analysis methods to examine modern fisheries management.

Tom quinnThomas P. Quinn
Professor, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

Thomas Quinn is interested in fish behavior and ecology. Specific topics of research interest include: migratory behavior, habitat requirements, and spawning behavior of salmon and trout. His lab also blends field techniques such as tagging, telemetry and direct observations with laboratory experiments.

Steven RobertsSteven Roberts
Assistant Professor, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

Steven Roberts is interested in the physiology of aquatic organisms as it relates to aquaculture and natural resource conservation. Specific topics of research interest include: stress response, immune function and growth physiology.  The primary research approaches involve characterizing the transcriptome of aquatic organisms through gene expression analysis.

Daniel SchindlerDaniel Schindler
Associate Professor, Biology, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

Daniel Schindler focuses his research on understanding the causes and consequences of dynamics in aquatic ecosystems. Specific topics of research interest include: the effects of changing climate on trophic interactions and ecosystem services provided by aquatic ecosystems, fisheries as large-scale drivers of ecosystem organization, the importance of anadromous fishes for linking marine ecosystems to coastal aquatic and riparian systems, and the importance of aquatic-terrestrial coupling in the organization of aquatic ecosystems.

Ken SebensKenneth Sebens
Professor, Biology, Friday Harbor Laboratories
Website 

Ken Sebens conducts research on benthic populations and communities in both temperate and tropical locations. One project is an investigation of community and population dynamics, and long-term change in rocky subtidal habitats in Massachusetts. This project has been funded by NSF since 1979, facilitating one of the most extensive long-term studies of coastal marine communities in the world, and will be continued in collaboration with researchers at Northeastern University. He will also initiate new research on the rocky subtidal communities of the San Juan Islands.  Dr. Sebens has had over 30 years experience as a diving scientist, including six one to two week missions living and working in the underwater laboratories “Hydrolab” and  “Aquarius”, located on Caribbean coral reefs. His research on coral ecology has focused on the diverse sources of nutrition for reef corals, and the influence of hydrodynamics on coral particle capture and nutrient uptake from seawater, calcification and growth rate (NSF, NOAA funding since 1985). These studies have taken him to many Caribbean reef locations including Jamaica, St. Croix, Belize, and Bermuda. He also spent a sabbatical year in Australia working on the Great Barrier Reef, while based in Townsville and Lizard Island.

Si SimenstadCharles A. Simenstad
Research Professor, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

Charles Simenstad is interested in studying shallow-water communities and food webs of estuarine and coastal marine ecosystems throughout Puget Sound, the Washington coast, and Alaska. Specific topics of research interest include: exploring the ecological mechanisms whereby estuarine and coastal wetlands support fish (especially juvenile Pacific salmon), basic ecosystem-, community- and habitat-level interactions with emphasis on predator-prey relationships, and enhancement of estuarine and coastal wetland ecosystems.

Joseph SisnerosJoseph Sisneros
Assistant Professor, Psychology
Website

Joseph Sisneros is interested in the plasticity of neural mechanisms and behavior. His research program focuses on the adaptive plasticity of sensory systems for the encoding of biological relevant signals used during social and reproductive behaviors. Fish are used as model systems to investigate the ontogenetic and sexual-maturity dependent changes in the response properties and function of sensory systems, specifically the auditory and electrosensory systems of fishes.

Eric SmithEric A. Smith
Professor, Anthropology
Website

Eric Smith is interested in the evolutionary-ecological analysis of production and reproduction. Current research interest primarily involves the Inuit (Canadian Eskimos) of arctic Canada as well as communities in the Torres Strait (tropical Australia) that examine foraging decisions in relation to reproductive strategies, gender relations, and village politics among the Meriam, a Melanesian island population.

Karl BanseAdam Summers
Associate Professor, Biology, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences, Associate Director, Friday Harbor Laboratories
Website

Adam Summer’s research has been influenced by his background in engineering and mathematics and his interest in the evolution of diverse forms. He has many collaborative projects on a variety of vertebrate taxa, including reptiles, amphibians, bony fishes, and cartilaginous fishes.  His main research program is in understanding the effects of material properties on the form and function of organisms. For example, He uses a comparison between the cartilaginous fishes and the bony fishes as a model system for understanding the constraints and opportunities presented by a cartilaginous skeleton.  Complex interactions between structure and material properties occur at many different levels; therefore he approaches problems at several disparate size scales: the comparative biochemistry of cartilage, ultra- and microstructural morphology, gross anatomy, and function at the whole animal level. It has become clear that insights gained from one level of organization are often informative at several other levels.

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Glenn VanBlaricomGlenn VanBlaricom
Professor, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

Glenn VanBlaricom is interested in aquatic and marine wildlife, community ecology, and ecological consequences of oil spills in marine environments. Specific topics of research interest include: community ecology of sea otters in the coastal marine habitats of Russia and the west coast of the US, the translocation of sea otters in order to establish a new population in California, and interactions of other aquatic wildlife and their ecosystems in Washington.

Robert WaalandJ. Robert Waaland
Professor, Biology
Website

Robert Waaland is interested in the biology of the algae with an emphasis on seaweeds. Specific topics of research interest include: studies involving the biology of eelgrass meadows and the systematics and phylogeny of certain seaweeds (e.g., the Bangiaceae [Stiller & Waaland 1996, 1993] in the red algae and the Ulvaceae in the green algae).

Peter WardPeter D. Ward
Professor, Biology
Website

Peter Ward is interested in patterns of speciation in the ectocochliate cephalopod nautilus and processes of distinction in ancient cephalopods. Specific topics of research interest include: live capture and transport of nautilus specimens to the U.S. where shell biometric and gel electrophoretic research is conducted and fossil work taking place in France and Spain looking for patterns of survival and extinction in ammonites and nautiloids.

Graham YoungGraham Young
Professor, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

Graham Young’s interests are in the fundamental regulatory mechanisms driving reproduction, developmental processes such as the salmonid parr-smolt transformation and eel metamorphosis, and the stress response. A major focus of his current research is on reproduction of teleost fishes, largely targeting the role of hormones in male and female germ cell development, and the regulation of expression of reproduction-related genes. He has begun several lines of research into the effects of endocrine-disrupting contaminants on salmonid fishes. He also is undertaking studies that may ultimately result in the ability to measure physiological variables in migrating fish through data gathering via PIT tags.  His lab also conducts work related to aquaculture. We He has worked with industry on accelerating and synchronizing maturation in salmonids, investigated induced maturation/spawning protocols for eels and assessed growth and reproduction in the several fish candidate fish species for aquaculture.

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Emeritus/Retired Faculty

Karl BanseKarl Banse
Professor Emeritus, Oceanography
Website

Karl Banse is interested in plankton ecology and biology. Specific topics of research interest include: plankton production and hydrography, especially in the Arabian Sea, and methodology in plankton work.

Bob FrancisRobert C. Francis
Professor Emeritus, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

Robert Francis is interested in fisheries management, marine ecosystem dynamics, and fisheries oceanography. Specific topics of research interest include: understanding the structure and dynamics of large marine ecosystems, effects of harvest and physical forcing on marine ecosystems, and quantitative fishery science (e.g. statistics, mathematical modeling, population and/or ecosystem dynamics). 

Bruce FrostBruce Frost
Professor, Oceanography
Website

Bruce Frost is interested in many facets of oceanography. Specific topics of interest include: micro-scale foraging strategies of marine microorganisms within physical support matrices (particle aggregates, sediments, sea ice), especially as they influence material cycles and the degradation of organic pollutants (bioremediation), molecular enzymatic basis for psychrophily in marine bacteria and relevance to polar ecology biotechnology, bioremediation, and astrobiology. 

Katherine GraubardKatherine Graubard
Research Professor Emerita, Biology
Website

Katherine Graubard is interested in the field of neurobiology. Specific topics of research interest include: functional plasticity of neurons and animal behavior and the role of nitric oxide and the second messenger, cyclic GMP, in the development and modulation of the stomatogastric nervous system in crabs and lobsters.

Alan KohnAlan J. Kohn
Professor Emeritus, Biology
Website

Alan Kohn is interested in evolutionary processes that have led to high biotic diversity in tropical marine environments. Specific topics of research interest include: elucidating important evolutionary trends in diversity, morphology, distribution, and ecology of marine mollusks, evolution of taxonomic diversity, and relationships between larval developmental mode and biogeographic patterns.

Eugene KozloffEugene N. Kozloff
Professor Emeritus, Biology
Website

Eugene Kozloff is interested in systematics and functional morphology of marine turbellarians, and the biology of invertebrates. Specific topics of research interest include: differentiation, dedifferentiation, and redifferentiation of an acoel flatworm; acoel fauna of the region. Dr. Kozloff is based at Friday Harbor Laboratories.

Bruce MillerBruce Miller
Professor Emeritus, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences

Bruce Miller is interested in the ecological life history of marine fishes. Specific topics of research interest include recruitment variability in rockfishes, and a variety of studies on the ecological and early life history of marine fishes.

Bob PaineRobert T. Paine
Professor Emeritus, Biology
Website

Robert Paine is interested in factors organizing and, therefore, producing observable structure on a diverse rocky shore exposed to heavy wave action. Specific topics of research interest include: predator mediated coexistence, the strength of interactions and food web structure, the interplay between grazing intensity and benthic algal production, and factors generating alternative community states.

Richard StrathmannRichard R. Strathmann
Professor, Friday Harbor Laboratories, Biology
Website

Richard Strathmann is interested in the functional and historical constraints on developmental adaptations of marine invertebrates. Specific topics of interest include: evolution of rates of development, constraints on parental protection of embryos, morphological plasticity in response to food, larval feeding mechanisms, and evolutionary transitions between modes of development. His lab is also working on larval dispersal, adequacy of cues to favorable sites for settling larvae, relationships between adult size and brooding, hermaphroditism, fertilization success, and functional consequences of coloniality.

Gordie SwartzmanGordie Swartzman
Professor Emeritus, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Website

Gordie Swartzman is interested in ecological simulations, spatial data analysis (spatial statistics), and developing user-friendly front ends for various customized application packages. Specific topics of research interest include: spatially explicit phenomena in ecological systems, patchily distributed fish (fish schools) and their prey patches, and ecological simulation models that are evaluated by developing models of plankton dynamics in repeatable microcosms (having true replicates).

Gordie SwartzmanA.O. Dennis Willows
Professor Emeritus, Friday Harbor Laboratories, Biology
Website

Dennis Willows is interested in neurophysiology of marine mollusks. Specific topics of research interest include: studying the neural circuits underlying control of feeding and magnetosensory orientation behaviors and using behavioral, electrophysiological, and molecular/biochemical techniques to sort these out. In particular, the Willows lab is trying to determine which central nervous system circuits, neurons and peptides are responsible for detecting and coordinating responses to the geomagnetic field and to rheotactic (water current) stimuli.

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