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RESEARCH

In the Marine Predators Group, we use computational, lab, and field-based studies to address the scales of organization in the marine realm (from organism to ocean basin) that drive the pelagic ecosystems we depend on. While our work is rooted in oceanographic theory, we are driven to develop transformative approaches that seek to leverage fundamental biophysical interactions research to connect scientific inquiry to emerging ocean challenges, such as managing marine resources in a changing and dynamic ocean.
Explore

Explore

open and deep ocean ecosystems

Develop

Develop

knowledge and tools

Solve

Solve

ocean challenges in a changing world

Recent publications

OUR TEAM

Camrin Braun

Camrin Braun

Principal Investigator
Assistant Professor at UW SAFS
Camrin is a marine ecologist working at the interface of top predator ecology and oceanography. His research seeks to unite physical-biological interactions with the challenges of managing living marine resources in a dynamic ocean. He is particularly passionate about applying computational, lab and field-based approaches to emerging ocean challenges. For example, his work in predator-environment relationships has demonstrated the significance of the ocean twilight zone for top predators, a deep region of the marine realm that remains largely unexplored. He received his PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology-Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program in Oceanography and recently completed a NASA-funded postdoc at the Applied Physics Laboratory (UW) studying the influence of (sub)mesoscale oceanography on pelagic ecosystems. Dr. Braun received his MSc from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (Thuwal, Saudi Arabia) and is a National Geographic Explorer and member of the Explorer’s Club.
Martini Arostegui

Martini Arostegui

Affiliate Postdoctoral Scholar
Postdoc at UW Applied Physics Lab
Martini’s primary research interest is the behavior and ecology of fishes in both marine and aquatic ecosystems. His current research in the (Sub)mesoscale Group at the UW Applied Physics Lab is to develop a mechanistic understanding of the influence of (sub)mesoscale oceanography on the distribution and movement of pelagic fishes. This research combines satellite telemetry in the Red Sea and fishery-dependent data from Hawaii to explore predator ecology, identify bycatch hotspots, and promote sustainable fisheries. During his PhD at UW SAFS, Martini studied the ecotypic differentiation of rainbow trout and life history diversity of salmonids in lakes. His other research interests include recreational and commercial fisheries management strategies, trophic ecology of protected species, parasite-host interactions, biological control of human diseases, and stable isotope methodologies.
Emmett 'Carp Boss' Culhane

Emmett 'Carp Boss' Culhane

Visiting Graduate Student
MSC candidate at Yale University
Emmett is a graduate student at Yale University where he is studying machine learning and computational marine science. Prior to attending Yale, Emmett worked as a performer on several DARPA programs under the Information Innovation Office (I2O), where he contributed to research efforts in computer science and counter intelligence. He is currently researching the use of non-linear dimensionality reduction algorithms as a method for taxonomic subtyping of plankton based on in-situ imagery. In the Marine Predator Group, he is collaborating with NASA JPL to deploy open-source backend software for the standardization and centralization of marine animal telemetry data.
Aidan Cox

Aidan Cox

Volunteer undergraduate
Undergrad in Marine Biology at UW
Aidan Cox is a third year Undergraduate in the Marine Biology department at the University of Washington. His research aspirations include quantifying deep-sea habitat use in marine predators to inform exploration and conservation. As a member of the Marine Predator Group, Aidan is responsible for analysis and visualization of pop-up satellite archival tag data. His current work involves quantifying surface use by North Atlantic swordfish to improve tagging approaches and technologies. These results inform study design and implementation of innovative technologies to explore how these predators interact with oceanographic features, including the deep ocean.

Contact us

Message could not be send due to captcha not loadable. Please contact us at cdbraun@uw.edu.
Message could not be send. Please contact us at cdbraun@uw.edu.