Clinical Trials and Studies

The University of Washington’s Memory and Brain Wellness Center/Alzheimer's Disease Research Center serves as a site for observational studies and trials of potential treatments, prevention strategies, and new diagnostic approaches for Alzheimer’s disease and related neurodegenerative conditions, such as frontotemporal degeneration and Lewy Body dementia/Parkinson's disease dementia, open for enrollment at UW Medicine. This page provides information about these studies and how you can learn more or participate. New studies appear over time, and these may involve other groups of patients. We think of study participants as our partners in the effort to find a prevention for neurological conditions that lead to dementia.

Clinical trials provide a controlled and monitored environment where volunteer research participants can safely take experimental medication. The trials at our center are placebo-controlled, double-blind studies, meaning that there is a chance that participants will be on the experimental medication or on a placebo (a substance that looks the same but contains no medication).

For expanded information about participating in Alzheimer disease research studies at the UW, please visit Participating in Research

Guide to Clinical Trials and Studies at the UW

You may be eligible if you have:

Aging with Pride: IDEA (Innovations in Dementia Empowerment and Action for LGBTQ people)

Aging with Pride: IDEA (Innovations in Dementia Empowerment and Action) is an exercise and problem-solving program for older adults with memory loss and the people who help them. 

The study is the first federally-funded project testing a program designed to improve quality of life for LGBTQ people who experience memory loss or who help those experiencing memory loss. Participants are compensated for their time.

The study has expanded enrollment to  all 50 states. Older adults with memory loss can participate with an informal care partner, who may be a spouse or partner, friend, family member, or anyone who assists them. Either the person with memory loss or the person who helps them (or both) must be LGBTQ. Participants meet with a coach to learn exercises and strategies related to memory loss. The program includes 9 in-person sessions with the coach over 6 weeks, with follow-up phone calls. 

IDEA is led by University of Washington School of Social Work professor Karen Fredriksen Goldsen and UW Nursing professor Linda Teri. Dr. Fredriksen Goldsen is the primary investigator for Aging with Pride: National Health, Aging, and Sexuality/Gender Study (NHAS), the first national longitudinal study of health and well-being in LGBTQ older adults, and Dr. Teri pioneered the RDAD (Reducing Disabilities in Alzheimer’s Disease) program, which has been shown to improve quality of life for people with memory loss and reduce rates of institutionalization.

Contact: 

Phone: 1-888-655-6646

Email: ageIDEA@uw.edu


AHEAD Study (BAN2401)

The AHEAD Study is testing whether an investigational treatment can lower people’s risk of memory loss due to Alzheimer’s disease.

Researchers have learned that changes in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease start as many as 20 years before they notice symptoms like memory problems. During those two decades, a protein in the brain called “amyloid” builds up in people who go on to have memory problems because of Alzheimer’s disease. While not all people with amyloid in their brain will develop memory problems, we know that the people who do are at a higher risk for developing the disease.

The study is funded by the National Institutes of Health, in partnership with the pharmaceutical company Eisai. It is being conducted by the NIH-funded Alzheimer’s Clinical Trial Consortium (ACTC), a network of leading academic Alzheimer’s research centers.

 

WHAT IS THE AHEAD STUDY?

The AHEAD Study is comprised of two different clinical trials testing the same investigational drug (known as BAN2401 (lecanemab)) in people who may be at risk for memory problems. Participants will receive personalized study treatment, instead of a one-size-fits-all approach. Study participants are enrolled in one of two AHEAD trials based on the level of amyloid in their brain: 

Participants with intermediate amyloid levels take part in the AHEAD A-3 trial—the first ever trial aimed at what may be the earliest signs of Alzheimer’s disease. Participants in the AHEAD A-3 trial will receive BAN2401 (lecanemab) once every 4 weeks for 4 years.

Participants with elevated amyloid levels take part in the AHEAD A-45 trial. Participants in the AHEAD A-45 trial will receive BAN2401 (lecanemab) once every 2 weeks for about 2 years and then once every 4 weeks for the remainder of the study.

Participants in both trials will receive intravenous (IV) infusions of BAN2401 (lecanemab), tailored to their risk of developing memory loss, or a placebo, an inactive substance designed to mimic the appearance of the drug. The infusion takes approximately 60 minutes.

At different points in the study, participants have a PET scan (or Positron Emission Tomography brain scan), to look at amyloid and tau (another protein) in their brain. This helps the participants and researchers track their health and this is the first study of its kind to use PET scans to measure amyloid and tau in all participants. The PET scan takes pictures of participants’ brains, allowing researchers to see and track changes in amyloid and tau levels.

 

ELIGIBILITY

Participants Eligible for the AHEAD Study:

Are healthy adults ages 55-80.

Have not been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia.

Have a study partner, either a close relative or friend, who will participate in one study visit per year.

Have elevated or intermediate levels of amyloid in their brain, found by imaging as part of the study.

Learn More

 

PARTICIPATION REQUIREMENTS

Learn about what you will do as a study participant

 

UW ADRC Site Contact:

Darla Chapman, ARNP

Email: darlac@uw.edu

Phone: 206-744-9337

 

UW ADRC Site PI:

Charles Bernick, MD, MPH, Director of Clinical Trials, MBWC

For More Information

Athira ATH-1017 Trial

The clinical trials of ATH-1017 are evaluating if a new investigational drug is safe and effective in improving symptoms of mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease. ATH-1017 is designed to boost a repair and regenerative pathway for brain cells, promoting brain health and function. ATH-1017 represents a new approach to treat Alzheimer’s disease, targeting the root cause of memory decline by repairing the brain cells and rebuilding the brain networks.

 

You or a loved one may be eligible if you:

♦ Are between 55 and 85 years of age

♦ Have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease

♦ Have a reliable support person or caregiver who is willing to participate in study visits, report on daily activities and oversee or help you with taking ATH-1017

 

More Info

♦ You may receive a stipend to compensate for time and effort for study participation including meals, travel, etc.

♦ Study participation and study drug are free to all participants

*The safety and efficacy of ATH-1017 for the treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer’s has not been previously established. Talk to your doctor about participating in Athira’s clinical trials of ATH-1017.

♦The study drug is administered once daily via subcutaneous injection using a prefilled syringe (i.e. small injection under the skin that you can take at home; the injection is prepared and ready for administration).

♦ The overall treatment duration will last about 6 months. A reliable caregiver or support person is required for study participation, to attend the clinical visits, answer questions from the study doctors, and help administer or supervise dosing of the study drug.

 

UW Study Contact

Sarah Simon at 206-744-0446 or  ssimon3@uw.edu


Green Memory (GV-971)

 A Phase 3, Multi-center, Randomized, Double-blind, Parallel-group, Placebo-controlled Clinical Trial to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Sodium Oligomannate (GV-971) in Treatment of Mild to Moderate Alzheimer's Disease (GREEN MEMORY: GREen Valley 971 EvaluatioN Memory)

The GREEN MEMORY Study is looking at an investigational medication, taken by mouth, for people with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease. The investigational medication is designed to restore the natural balance of bacteria in the gut. There are certain bacteria that are thought to cause inflammation in the brain and nerves, possibly contributing to Alzheimer's disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability and efficacy of GV-971 in mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease.

 

You may be eligible if you:

  • are between 50 and 85 years of age
  • are experiencing memory issues or have been diagnosed with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease.
  • have a study partner who knows you well, is with you three or more days a week, and can come to all study-related visits.

 

What to expect:

The study is made up of 4 parts: A screening period (to see if the study is right for you), 2 study treatment periods, and a follow-up period.

The Green Memory study involves a year of treatment with as few as seven clinic visits to Harborview Medical Center and additional research visits conducted by telephone. During the treatment period, 50% of participants will receive the investigational medication in pill form while 50% of participants will receive a placebo (an inactive medication). Every participant may be eligible to receive the investigational medication for 26 weeks after completion of their initial year of study participation. This investigational medication has been approved for use treating Alzheimer’s disease outside the U.S., and the Green Memory study is now being tested in the U.S. There is no cost to participate. Approximately 80 research clinics across North America are working on the Green Memory study.

 

Learn more:

Study website

Listing on ClinicalTrials.gov

 

UW ADRC Study Contact

Azma Parhin, MD, Research Coordinator, UW ADRC

Phone: 206-897-6350

Email: azmap@uw.edu

For More Information

Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Study NIA- LOAD

We are studying families with histories of dementia to understand the genetic components behind Alzheimer’s disease. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements: 

-Have living family member(s) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you 

-Are willing to be contacted every  1-2 years to complete memory testing and an interview, both of which can be completed over the phone

 

Contact

For more information, please contact the Research Coordinator at 206.277.1024

 

Study Leader

Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Adjunct Professor, Epidemiology
Director, GRECC, VISN-20 Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center
Psychiatrist, Clinical Core,  ADRC

For More Information

Technology for Early Dementia Diagnosis

Researchers at the VA Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Centers are studying wearable technologies that may be useful to help diagnose Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

ELIGIBILITY

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements:

-Have a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease or probable dementia with Lewy Bodies

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you

-Have at least 8 years of education

 

COMPENSATION

Volunteers who complete this study will receive up to $250 in appreciation for their time and participation.

 

CONTACT

Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

Study PI: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW


Athira ATH-1017 Trial

The clinical trials of ATH-1017 are evaluating if a new investigational drug is safe and effective in improving symptoms of mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease. ATH-1017 is designed to boost a repair and regenerative pathway for brain cells, promoting brain health and function. ATH-1017 represents a new approach to treat Alzheimer’s disease, targeting the root cause of memory decline by repairing the brain cells and rebuilding the brain networks.

 

You or a loved one may be eligible if you:

♦ Are between 55 and 85 years of age

♦ Have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease

♦ Have a reliable support person or caregiver who is willing to participate in study visits, report on daily activities and oversee or help you with taking ATH-1017

 

More Info

♦ You may receive a stipend to compensate for time and effort for study participation including meals, travel, etc.

♦ Study participation and study drug are free to all participants

*The safety and efficacy of ATH-1017 for the treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer’s has not been previously established. Talk to your doctor about participating in Athira’s clinical trials of ATH-1017.

♦The study drug is administered once daily via subcutaneous injection using a prefilled syringe (i.e. small injection under the skin that you can take at home; the injection is prepared and ready for administration).

♦ The overall treatment duration will last about 6 months. A reliable caregiver or support person is required for study participation, to attend the clinical visits, answer questions from the study doctors, and help administer or supervise dosing of the study drug.

 

UW Study Contact

Sarah Simon at 206-744-0446 or  ssimon3@uw.edu


Green Memory (GV-971)

 A Phase 3, Multi-center, Randomized, Double-blind, Parallel-group, Placebo-controlled Clinical Trial to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Sodium Oligomannate (GV-971) in Treatment of Mild to Moderate Alzheimer's Disease (GREEN MEMORY: GREen Valley 971 EvaluatioN Memory)

The GREEN MEMORY Study is looking at an investigational medication, taken by mouth, for people with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease. The investigational medication is designed to restore the natural balance of bacteria in the gut. There are certain bacteria that are thought to cause inflammation in the brain and nerves, possibly contributing to Alzheimer's disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability and efficacy of GV-971 in mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease.

 

You may be eligible if you:

  • are between 50 and 85 years of age
  • are experiencing memory issues or have been diagnosed with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease.
  • have a study partner who knows you well, is with you three or more days a week, and can come to all study-related visits.

 

What to expect:

The study is made up of 4 parts: A screening period (to see if the study is right for you), 2 study treatment periods, and a follow-up period.

The Green Memory study involves a year of treatment with as few as seven clinic visits to Harborview Medical Center and additional research visits conducted by telephone. During the treatment period, 50% of participants will receive the investigational medication in pill form while 50% of participants will receive a placebo (an inactive medication). Every participant may be eligible to receive the investigational medication for 26 weeks after completion of their initial year of study participation. This investigational medication has been approved for use treating Alzheimer’s disease outside the U.S., and the Green Memory study is now being tested in the U.S. There is no cost to participate. Approximately 80 research clinics across North America are working on the Green Memory study.

 

Learn more:

Study website

Listing on ClinicalTrials.gov

 

UW ADRC Study Contact

Azma Parhin, MD, Research Coordinator, UW ADRC

Phone: 206-897-6350

Email: azmap@uw.edu

For More Information

Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Study NIA- LOAD

We are studying families with histories of dementia to understand the genetic components behind Alzheimer’s disease. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements: 

-Have living family member(s) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you 

-Are willing to be contacted every  1-2 years to complete memory testing and an interview, both of which can be completed over the phone

 

Contact

For more information, please contact the Research Coordinator at 206.277.1024

 

Study Leader

Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Adjunct Professor, Epidemiology
Director, GRECC, VISN-20 Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center
Psychiatrist, Clinical Core,  ADRC

For More Information

PEACE-AD: Prazosin for Disruptive Agitation in Alzheimer’s Disease

The goal of the PEACE-AD clinical trial is to identify a well-tolerated treatment for people with severe agitation in the later stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). If you are a family member, caregiver, or friend of a person with AD who frequently experiences disruptive behavior, you may be aware that current treatment approaches to agitation in the advanced stages of AD are not optimal.

PEACE-AD is a phase II, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of the drug prazosin for disruptive agitation in Alzheimer’s disease. The PEACE-AD trial is taking place at academic medical centers and private clinics across the US that specialize in AD research, treatment and care. PEACE-AD investigators will enroll 80 participants who are living at home, with full time caregiving, or living in memory and long term care communities participating in the PEACE-AD trial.

Eligibility:

  • Males and females with probable or possible AD
  • Participants must be experiencing agitation that disrupts their daily life
  • Must live at home, with full-time caregiving, or in a memory or long term care community participating in PEACE-AD
  • Must have a study partner/caregiver available (home dwelling participants only)
  • Must not be bed bound
  • No major neurological disorder or unstable illness (other than AD)

 

UW ADRC Clinical Trial Coordinator:

Sarah Simon

Email: ssimon3@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 744-0446

 

PEACE-AD Clinical Trial Website

For More Information

Technology for Early Dementia Diagnosis

Researchers at the VA Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Centers are studying wearable technologies that may be useful to help diagnose Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

ELIGIBILITY

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements:

-Have a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease or probable dementia with Lewy Bodies

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you

-Have at least 8 years of education

 

COMPENSATION

Volunteers who complete this study will receive up to $250 in appreciation for their time and participation.

 

CONTACT

Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

Study PI: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW


ADRC Clinical Core

Who we are

The UW Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC) is part of a nationwide network of research centers funded by the National Institute on Aging to learn more about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.  We are exploring innovative approaches to diagnosis, treatment, and disease prevention by partnering with people who have normal memory and thinking and those who have memory concerns or are living with dementia.  

In order to learn more about diseases that cause memory loss and dementia, we are looking for volunteers from a variety of ethnic backgrounds and ages who are willing to participate in research.  It is important to study a diverse group of people so that the information we learn will benefit everyone.

 

Who we are seeking

The UW ADRC is interested in partnering with:

-People from underrepresented groups, such as African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians and Alaskan Natives.  

-People diagnosed with memory and thinking (cognitive) changes by their medical provider, especially a diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment

-We are also interested in partnering with people from any ethnic background who are 85 years or older and who do not have concerns about their memory or thinking. 

 

What to expect at a UW ADRC research visit

This study involves a yearly visit during which volunteers complete tests of their memory and thinking, have a brief physical and neurological examination, and answer questions about their medical history, memory, mood, and ability to perform daily activities. Volunteers must also have a study partner who knows them well and would notice changes in their memory, mood or ability to perform daily activities.  

We may also ask some volunteers for a blood or cerebral spinal fluid sample in order to learn more about how our bodies change in response to normal aging and dementia.

To learn more about participating, contact: UW ADRC at 206-744-0588,  uwadrc@uw.edu

For More Information

Aging with Pride: IDEA (Innovations in Dementia Empowerment and Action for LGBTQ people)

Aging with Pride: IDEA (Innovations in Dementia Empowerment and Action) is an exercise and problem-solving program for older adults with memory loss and the people who help them. 

The study is the first federally-funded project testing a program designed to improve quality of life for LGBTQ people who experience memory loss or who help those experiencing memory loss. Participants are compensated for their time.

The study has expanded enrollment to  all 50 states. Older adults with memory loss can participate with an informal care partner, who may be a spouse or partner, friend, family member, or anyone who assists them. Either the person with memory loss or the person who helps them (or both) must be LGBTQ. Participants meet with a coach to learn exercises and strategies related to memory loss. The program includes 9 in-person sessions with the coach over 6 weeks, with follow-up phone calls. 

IDEA is led by University of Washington School of Social Work professor Karen Fredriksen Goldsen and UW Nursing professor Linda Teri. Dr. Fredriksen Goldsen is the primary investigator for Aging with Pride: National Health, Aging, and Sexuality/Gender Study (NHAS), the first national longitudinal study of health and well-being in LGBTQ older adults, and Dr. Teri pioneered the RDAD (Reducing Disabilities in Alzheimer’s Disease) program, which has been shown to improve quality of life for people with memory loss and reduce rates of institutionalization.

Contact: 

Phone: 1-888-655-6646

Email: ageIDEA@uw.edu


Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Study NIA- LOAD

We are studying families with histories of dementia to understand the genetic components behind Alzheimer’s disease. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements: 

-Have living family member(s) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you 

-Are willing to be contacted every  1-2 years to complete memory testing and an interview, both of which can be completed over the phone

 

Contact

For more information, please contact the Research Coordinator at 206.277.1024

 

Study Leader

Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Adjunct Professor, Epidemiology
Director, GRECC, VISN-20 Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center
Psychiatrist, Clinical Core,  ADRC

For More Information

MAP: Metformin in Alzheimer’s Dementia Prevention

 JOIN US IN OUR FIGHT TO HELP PREVENT DEMENTIA 

MAP: Metformin in Alzheimer's Dementia Prevention is a research study looking at an existing drug used for diabetes prevention. The study tests if this drug can help prevent a decline in memory and thinking abilities for people with mild memory problems. It is a randomized study in which you will take either metformin (Glucophage® XR) or a placebo. 

Randomized means you will have an equal opportunity of getting the study drug or placebo. A placebo is a pill that looks the same as the study drug, but has no medicine. 

There will be no charge to you for the study drug or study visits. 

Taking part in this study is completely voluntary. We appreciate your participation. 

MAP is a multi-center study, where people can take part in the study at 11 locations throughout the United States. It is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) through the National Institute on Aging (NIA). Our researchers are experienced in running research studies. They are also experts in the field of memory loss, dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease. We invite you to join us in our search for treatments to improve the lives of those with memory problems due to Alzheimer’s disease. 

 

 You may be able to join if: 

  • you are 55-90 years old, 
  • you or your loved ones have noticed some changes in your memory, and 
  • you are not already being treated for diabetes or dementia 

 

Potential benefits:

  • You will receive some of your blood test results. We can also share these results with your healthcare provider.
  • Your participation may improve the prevention of dementia for future generations.

 

Taking part in MAP is voluntary and will not affect the care you receive.  If you decide to join, you will be compensated for your time. You may earn up to $850 for completing all study-related visits. 

 

To learn more about the MAP study, please contact our local UW study coordinator: 

Hanson Research Team 

(206) 744-1851 or (206) 897-5393

hansonlab@uw.edu 

 

Visit us at: https://www.iths.org/participate/metformin-in-alzheimers-dementia-prevention-map/


The Remote Cog Study

Researchers at the VA Puget Sound Hospital in Seattle are seeking volunteers for the Remote Cog Study. Black Americans often miss out on early care that can help with memory and mental health changes. We hope to learn how to spot these changes earlier in Black Americans.

We are enrolling Black Americans who are age 65+, concerned about their memory, and interested in a 10-week research study from the comfort of their own homes that includes: 

 

Answering health-related questions using paper, a telephone, and a mobile device 

Using several devices at home, including a wristwatch, thermometer, and blood pressure monitor 

Providing a blood sample 

 

Learn more

Please contact us at (206) 277-1379 for more information.

The lead researcher of this study is Dr. Debby Tsuang at S182 GRECC, VA Puget Sound, 1660 S. Columbian Way, Seattle WA 98108.

For More Information

ADRC Clinical Core

Who we are

The UW Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC) is part of a nationwide network of research centers funded by the National Institute on Aging to learn more about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.  We are exploring innovative approaches to diagnosis, treatment, and disease prevention by partnering with people who have normal memory and thinking and those who have memory concerns or are living with dementia.  

In order to learn more about diseases that cause memory loss and dementia, we are looking for volunteers from a variety of ethnic backgrounds and ages who are willing to participate in research.  It is important to study a diverse group of people so that the information we learn will benefit everyone.

 

Who we are seeking

The UW ADRC is interested in partnering with:

-People from underrepresented groups, such as African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians and Alaskan Natives.  

-People diagnosed with memory and thinking (cognitive) changes by their medical provider, especially a diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment

-We are also interested in partnering with people from any ethnic background who are 85 years or older and who do not have concerns about their memory or thinking. 

 

What to expect at a UW ADRC research visit

This study involves a yearly visit during which volunteers complete tests of their memory and thinking, have a brief physical and neurological examination, and answer questions about their medical history, memory, mood, and ability to perform daily activities. Volunteers must also have a study partner who knows them well and would notice changes in their memory, mood or ability to perform daily activities.  

We may also ask some volunteers for a blood or cerebral spinal fluid sample in order to learn more about how our bodies change in response to normal aging and dementia.

To learn more about participating, contact: UW ADRC at 206-744-0588,  uwadrc@uw.edu

For More Information

AHEAD Study (BAN2401)

The AHEAD Study is testing whether an investigational treatment can lower people’s risk of memory loss due to Alzheimer’s disease.

Researchers have learned that changes in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease start as many as 20 years before they notice symptoms like memory problems. During those two decades, a protein in the brain called “amyloid” builds up in people who go on to have memory problems because of Alzheimer’s disease. While not all people with amyloid in their brain will develop memory problems, we know that the people who do are at a higher risk for developing the disease.

The study is funded by the National Institutes of Health, in partnership with the pharmaceutical company Eisai. It is being conducted by the NIH-funded Alzheimer’s Clinical Trial Consortium (ACTC), a network of leading academic Alzheimer’s research centers.

 

WHAT IS THE AHEAD STUDY?

The AHEAD Study is comprised of two different clinical trials testing the same investigational drug (known as BAN2401 (lecanemab)) in people who may be at risk for memory problems. Participants will receive personalized study treatment, instead of a one-size-fits-all approach. Study participants are enrolled in one of two AHEAD trials based on the level of amyloid in their brain: 

Participants with intermediate amyloid levels take part in the AHEAD A-3 trial—the first ever trial aimed at what may be the earliest signs of Alzheimer’s disease. Participants in the AHEAD A-3 trial will receive BAN2401 (lecanemab) once every 4 weeks for 4 years.

Participants with elevated amyloid levels take part in the AHEAD A-45 trial. Participants in the AHEAD A-45 trial will receive BAN2401 (lecanemab) once every 2 weeks for about 2 years and then once every 4 weeks for the remainder of the study.

Participants in both trials will receive intravenous (IV) infusions of BAN2401 (lecanemab), tailored to their risk of developing memory loss, or a placebo, an inactive substance designed to mimic the appearance of the drug. The infusion takes approximately 60 minutes.

At different points in the study, participants have a PET scan (or Positron Emission Tomography brain scan), to look at amyloid and tau (another protein) in their brain. This helps the participants and researchers track their health and this is the first study of its kind to use PET scans to measure amyloid and tau in all participants. The PET scan takes pictures of participants’ brains, allowing researchers to see and track changes in amyloid and tau levels.

 

ELIGIBILITY

Participants Eligible for the AHEAD Study:

Are healthy adults ages 55-80.

Have not been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia.

Have a study partner, either a close relative or friend, who will participate in one study visit per year.

Have elevated or intermediate levels of amyloid in their brain, found by imaging as part of the study.

Learn More

 

PARTICIPATION REQUIREMENTS

Learn about what you will do as a study participant

 

UW ADRC Site Contact:

Darla Chapman, ARNP

Email: darlac@uw.edu

Phone: 206-744-9337

 

UW ADRC Site PI:

Charles Bernick, MD, MPH, Director of Clinical Trials, MBWC

For More Information

Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Study NIA- LOAD

We are studying families with histories of dementia to understand the genetic components behind Alzheimer’s disease. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements: 

-Have living family member(s) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you 

-Are willing to be contacted every  1-2 years to complete memory testing and an interview, both of which can be completed over the phone

 

Contact

For more information, please contact the Research Coordinator at 206.277.1024

 

Study Leader

Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Adjunct Professor, Epidemiology
Director, GRECC, VISN-20 Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center
Psychiatrist, Clinical Core,  ADRC

For More Information

Latino Caregiver Research Study

Latino Caregiver Research Study (Spanish/English translations below)

 

Investigadores de la Universidad de Washington están desarrollando un programa para apoyar a cuidadores de familiares con enfermedad de Alzheimer o demencias relacionadas. Están interesados en hablar con familiares o amigos cercanos que son cuidadores de personas con demencia que tengan problemas de comportamiento como depresión, discusiones o rehusarse a bañarse y vestirse. 

Su participación es voluntaria y confidencial.

 

Buscamos personas que cumplan los siguientes requisitos:

-Se identifique como Hispano/Latino

-Cuiden a un familiar o amigo cercano con diagnóstico de enfermedad de Alzheimer u otra demencia r-elacionada

-Su familiar tiene problemas de comportamiento

 

Para participar necesita:

-Completar una encuesta (10 minutos) y participar en una entrevista por teléfono o Zoom.

-Recibirá una compensación de $45 en agradecimiento a su tiempo

 

Para participar en el estudio o recibir más información, favor de comunicarse con la Miriana Duran: mdp19@uw.edu ó 206-221-6206

 

______

Researchers at the University of Washington are developing a program to support family (or close friend) caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia. They are interested in speaking with family caregivers that are caring for individuals experiencing behavior issues such as trying to leave the house, arguing, or refusing to bathe or get dressed.

Research is always voluntary.

 

This study might be a good fit for you if you:

-Identify as Hispanic/Latino

-Take care of a family member or close friend diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia

- Have a family member or close friend who is experiencing behavior issues

 

If you decide to take part in the research study:

-You will need to complete a 10 minute survey and a 1 hour interview by phone or Zoom.

-You will receive $45 to thank you for your time and effort

 

To learn more about the study, please contact Miriana Duran: mdp19@uw.edu or 206-221-6206


Meal and Memory Study

APOE genotype and diet influences on Alzheimer's biomarkers

We are learning more and more about the risks for Alzheimer's disease every year, and that includes learning what foods are best at promoting brain health. It might be more complicated than 'this food is good or bad.' Dr. Angela Hanson, a geriatric physician at the University of Washington, is conducting a study that examines how a risk gene for Alzheimer's disease might affect people's memory and metabolic responses to different meals. Her preliminary work showed that people who carry the gene APOE4 (E4) responded differently to different Alzheimer's treatments and diets, compared to people who did not carry this gene. Dr. Hanson plans to study this further with the "Meal and Memory Study” in adults age 55 and older who do not have dementia. 

 

Eligibility: Participants may be men or women, ages 55 and older. People who have known dementia, or known diabetes, are not eligible.

 

Key researcher:  Angela Hanson, MD

Study Contact: Angela Hanson at 206-897-5393 or hansonaj@uw.edu

For More Information

PoND: Prazosin and CSF Biomarkers in Aging, MCI and AD

We are seeking healthy, medically stable volunteers over the age of 45 who do not have memory problems for a new approach to preventing Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

Details

  • The study includes an assessment of your physical and mental health.
  • You will receive prazosin (a pill used for posttraumatic stress disorder and high blood pressure).
  • The study will take about 14 hours, spread over roughly 9 visits during a 3-month period.
  • These visits will be at the Seattle VA.
  • You will be compensated for each of your visits, with the total compensation for the study amounting to $750 to $825.

Key Researcher: The PI of this study is Murray Raskind at S-116-MIRECC, 1660 S. Columbian Way, Seattle, WA  98108.

Study Contact: 206.277.1491 or 1.800.329.8387 ext. 1491 

For More Information

The Remote Cog Study

Researchers at the VA Puget Sound Hospital in Seattle are seeking volunteers for the Remote Cog Study. Black Americans often miss out on early care that can help with memory and mental health changes. We hope to learn how to spot these changes earlier in Black Americans.

We are enrolling Black Americans who are age 65+, concerned about their memory, and interested in a 10-week research study from the comfort of their own homes that includes: 

 

Answering health-related questions using paper, a telephone, and a mobile device 

Using several devices at home, including a wristwatch, thermometer, and blood pressure monitor 

Providing a blood sample 

 

Learn more

Please contact us at (206) 277-1379 for more information.

The lead researcher of this study is Dr. Debby Tsuang at S182 GRECC, VA Puget Sound, 1660 S. Columbian Way, Seattle WA 98108.

For More Information

ADRC Clinical Core

Who we are

The UW Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC) is part of a nationwide network of research centers funded by the National Institute on Aging to learn more about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.  We are exploring innovative approaches to diagnosis, treatment, and disease prevention by partnering with people who have normal memory and thinking and those who have memory concerns or are living with dementia.  

In order to learn more about diseases that cause memory loss and dementia, we are looking for volunteers from a variety of ethnic backgrounds and ages who are willing to participate in research.  It is important to study a diverse group of people so that the information we learn will benefit everyone.

 

Who we are seeking

The UW ADRC is interested in partnering with:

-People from underrepresented groups, such as African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians and Alaskan Natives.  

-People diagnosed with memory and thinking (cognitive) changes by their medical provider, especially a diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment

-We are also interested in partnering with people from any ethnic background who are 85 years or older and who do not have concerns about their memory or thinking. 

 

What to expect at a UW ADRC research visit

This study involves a yearly visit during which volunteers complete tests of their memory and thinking, have a brief physical and neurological examination, and answer questions about their medical history, memory, mood, and ability to perform daily activities. Volunteers must also have a study partner who knows them well and would notice changes in their memory, mood or ability to perform daily activities.  

We may also ask some volunteers for a blood or cerebral spinal fluid sample in order to learn more about how our bodies change in response to normal aging and dementia.

To learn more about participating, contact: UW ADRC at 206-744-0588,  uwadrc@uw.edu

For More Information

Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Study NIA- LOAD

We are studying families with histories of dementia to understand the genetic components behind Alzheimer’s disease. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements: 

-Have living family member(s) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you 

-Are willing to be contacted every  1-2 years to complete memory testing and an interview, both of which can be completed over the phone

 

Contact

For more information, please contact the Research Coordinator at 206.277.1024

 

Study Leader

Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Adjunct Professor, Epidemiology
Director, GRECC, VISN-20 Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center
Psychiatrist, Clinical Core,  ADRC

For More Information

Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Study NIA- LOAD

We are studying families with histories of dementia to understand the genetic components behind Alzheimer’s disease. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements: 

-Have living family member(s) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you 

-Are willing to be contacted every  1-2 years to complete memory testing and an interview, both of which can be completed over the phone

 

Contact

For more information, please contact the Research Coordinator at 206.277.1024

 

Study Leader

Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Adjunct Professor, Epidemiology
Director, GRECC, VISN-20 Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center
Psychiatrist, Clinical Core,  ADRC

For More Information

Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Study NIA- LOAD

We are studying families with histories of dementia to understand the genetic components behind Alzheimer’s disease. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements: 

-Have living family member(s) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you 

-Are willing to be contacted every  1-2 years to complete memory testing and an interview, both of which can be completed over the phone

 

Contact

For more information, please contact the Research Coordinator at 206.277.1024

 

Study Leader

Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Adjunct Professor, Epidemiology
Director, GRECC, VISN-20 Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center
Psychiatrist, Clinical Core,  ADRC

For More Information

Technology for Early Dementia Diagnosis

Researchers at the VA Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Centers are studying wearable technologies that may be useful to help diagnose Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

ELIGIBILITY

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements:

-Have a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease or probable dementia with Lewy Bodies

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you

-Have at least 8 years of education

 

COMPENSATION

Volunteers who complete this study will receive up to $250 in appreciation for their time and participation.

 

CONTACT

Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

Study PI: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW


The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The purpose of the Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium is to develop a collection of samples from individuals diagnosed with dementia with lewy bodies (DLB), dementia with lewy bodies/mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or Parkinson's disease dementia who will be followed over time. The consortium will collect detailed clinical information, biospecimens, and imaging data. Led by top leaders in the field, this consortium will fill the gap in resources available for biomarker development in Lewy Body Dementia and promote additional future research by having a readily available subject sample. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you:

-Have a diagnosis of probable dementia with lewy body/MCI or Parkinson's disease dementia

-Have a study partner who is able and willing to comply with required study procedures

-Have at least eight years of education

The study doctor will also check for other medical conditions or reasons that might prevent you from participating in the study

 

Study Leader: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW

Seattle Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

For More Information

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The purpose of the Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium is to develop a collection of samples from individuals diagnosed with dementia with lewy bodies (DLB), dementia with lewy bodies/mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or Parkinson's disease dementia who will be followed over time. The consortium will collect detailed clinical information, biospecimens, and imaging data. Led by top leaders in the field, this consortium will fill the gap in resources available for biomarker development in Lewy Body Dementia and promote additional future research by having a readily available subject sample. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you:

-Have a diagnosis of probable dementia with lewy body/MCI or Parkinson's disease dementia

-Have a study partner who is able and willing to comply with required study procedures

-Have at least eight years of education

The study doctor will also check for other medical conditions or reasons that might prevent you from participating in the study

 

Study Leader: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW

Seattle Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

For More Information

Latino Caregiver Research Study

Latino Caregiver Research Study (Spanish/English translations below)

 

Investigadores de la Universidad de Washington están desarrollando un programa para apoyar a cuidadores de familiares con enfermedad de Alzheimer o demencias relacionadas. Están interesados en hablar con familiares o amigos cercanos que son cuidadores de personas con demencia que tengan problemas de comportamiento como depresión, discusiones o rehusarse a bañarse y vestirse. 

Su participación es voluntaria y confidencial.

 

Buscamos personas que cumplan los siguientes requisitos:

-Se identifique como Hispano/Latino

-Cuiden a un familiar o amigo cercano con diagnóstico de enfermedad de Alzheimer u otra demencia r-elacionada

-Su familiar tiene problemas de comportamiento

 

Para participar necesita:

-Completar una encuesta (10 minutos) y participar en una entrevista por teléfono o Zoom.

-Recibirá una compensación de $45 en agradecimiento a su tiempo

 

Para participar en el estudio o recibir más información, favor de comunicarse con la Miriana Duran: mdp19@uw.edu ó 206-221-6206

 

______

Researchers at the University of Washington are developing a program to support family (or close friend) caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia. They are interested in speaking with family caregivers that are caring for individuals experiencing behavior issues such as trying to leave the house, arguing, or refusing to bathe or get dressed.

Research is always voluntary.

 

This study might be a good fit for you if you:

-Identify as Hispanic/Latino

-Take care of a family member or close friend diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia

- Have a family member or close friend who is experiencing behavior issues

 

If you decide to take part in the research study:

-You will need to complete a 10 minute survey and a 1 hour interview by phone or Zoom.

-You will receive $45 to thank you for your time and effort

 

To learn more about the study, please contact Miriana Duran: mdp19@uw.edu or 206-221-6206


Sort by Study Type

Aging with Pride: IDEA (Innovations in Dementia Empowerment and Action for LGBTQ people)

Aging with Pride: IDEA (Innovations in Dementia Empowerment and Action) is an exercise and problem-solving program for older adults with memory loss and the people who help them. 

The study is the first federally-funded project testing a program designed to improve quality of life for LGBTQ people who experience memory loss or who help those experiencing memory loss. Participants are compensated for their time.

The study has expanded enrollment to  all 50 states. Older adults with memory loss can participate with an informal care partner, who may be a spouse or partner, friend, family member, or anyone who assists them. Either the person with memory loss or the person who helps them (or both) must be LGBTQ. Participants meet with a coach to learn exercises and strategies related to memory loss. The program includes 9 in-person sessions with the coach over 6 weeks, with follow-up phone calls. 

IDEA is led by University of Washington School of Social Work professor Karen Fredriksen Goldsen and UW Nursing professor Linda Teri. Dr. Fredriksen Goldsen is the primary investigator for Aging with Pride: National Health, Aging, and Sexuality/Gender Study (NHAS), the first national longitudinal study of health and well-being in LGBTQ older adults, and Dr. Teri pioneered the RDAD (Reducing Disabilities in Alzheimer’s Disease) program, which has been shown to improve quality of life for people with memory loss and reduce rates of institutionalization.

Contact: 

Phone: 1-888-655-6646

Email: ageIDEA@uw.edu


Latino Caregiver Research Study

Latino Caregiver Research Study (Spanish/English translations below)

 

Investigadores de la Universidad de Washington están desarrollando un programa para apoyar a cuidadores de familiares con enfermedad de Alzheimer o demencias relacionadas. Están interesados en hablar con familiares o amigos cercanos que son cuidadores de personas con demencia que tengan problemas de comportamiento como depresión, discusiones o rehusarse a bañarse y vestirse. 

Su participación es voluntaria y confidencial.

 

Buscamos personas que cumplan los siguientes requisitos:

-Se identifique como Hispano/Latino

-Cuiden a un familiar o amigo cercano con diagnóstico de enfermedad de Alzheimer u otra demencia r-elacionada

-Su familiar tiene problemas de comportamiento

 

Para participar necesita:

-Completar una encuesta (10 minutos) y participar en una entrevista por teléfono o Zoom.

-Recibirá una compensación de $45 en agradecimiento a su tiempo

 

Para participar en el estudio o recibir más información, favor de comunicarse con la Miriana Duran: mdp19@uw.edu ó 206-221-6206

 

______

Researchers at the University of Washington are developing a program to support family (or close friend) caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia. They are interested in speaking with family caregivers that are caring for individuals experiencing behavior issues such as trying to leave the house, arguing, or refusing to bathe or get dressed.

Research is always voluntary.

 

This study might be a good fit for you if you:

-Identify as Hispanic/Latino

-Take care of a family member or close friend diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia

- Have a family member or close friend who is experiencing behavior issues

 

If you decide to take part in the research study:

-You will need to complete a 10 minute survey and a 1 hour interview by phone or Zoom.

-You will receive $45 to thank you for your time and effort

 

To learn more about the study, please contact Miriana Duran: mdp19@uw.edu or 206-221-6206


Technology for Early Dementia Diagnosis

Researchers at the VA Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Centers are studying wearable technologies that may be useful to help diagnose Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

ELIGIBILITY

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements:

-Have a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease or probable dementia with Lewy Bodies

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you

-Have at least 8 years of education

 

COMPENSATION

Volunteers who complete this study will receive up to $250 in appreciation for their time and participation.

 

CONTACT

Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

Study PI: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW


The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The purpose of the Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium is to develop a collection of samples from individuals diagnosed with dementia with lewy bodies (DLB), dementia with lewy bodies/mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or Parkinson's disease dementia who will be followed over time. The consortium will collect detailed clinical information, biospecimens, and imaging data. Led by top leaders in the field, this consortium will fill the gap in resources available for biomarker development in Lewy Body Dementia and promote additional future research by having a readily available subject sample. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you:

-Have a diagnosis of probable dementia with lewy body/MCI or Parkinson's disease dementia

-Have a study partner who is able and willing to comply with required study procedures

-Have at least eight years of education

The study doctor will also check for other medical conditions or reasons that might prevent you from participating in the study

 

Study Leader: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW

Seattle Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

For More Information

The Remote Cog Study

Researchers at the VA Puget Sound Hospital in Seattle are seeking volunteers for the Remote Cog Study. Black Americans often miss out on early care that can help with memory and mental health changes. We hope to learn how to spot these changes earlier in Black Americans.

We are enrolling Black Americans who are age 65+, concerned about their memory, and interested in a 10-week research study from the comfort of their own homes that includes: 

 

Answering health-related questions using paper, a telephone, and a mobile device 

Using several devices at home, including a wristwatch, thermometer, and blood pressure monitor 

Providing a blood sample 

 

Learn more

Please contact us at (206) 277-1379 for more information.

The lead researcher of this study is Dr. Debby Tsuang at S182 GRECC, VA Puget Sound, 1660 S. Columbian Way, Seattle WA 98108.

For More Information

AHEAD Study (BAN2401)

The AHEAD Study is testing whether an investigational treatment can lower people’s risk of memory loss due to Alzheimer’s disease.

Researchers have learned that changes in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease start as many as 20 years before they notice symptoms like memory problems. During those two decades, a protein in the brain called “amyloid” builds up in people who go on to have memory problems because of Alzheimer’s disease. While not all people with amyloid in their brain will develop memory problems, we know that the people who do are at a higher risk for developing the disease.

The study is funded by the National Institutes of Health, in partnership with the pharmaceutical company Eisai. It is being conducted by the NIH-funded Alzheimer’s Clinical Trial Consortium (ACTC), a network of leading academic Alzheimer’s research centers.

 

WHAT IS THE AHEAD STUDY?

The AHEAD Study is comprised of two different clinical trials testing the same investigational drug (known as BAN2401 (lecanemab)) in people who may be at risk for memory problems. Participants will receive personalized study treatment, instead of a one-size-fits-all approach. Study participants are enrolled in one of two AHEAD trials based on the level of amyloid in their brain: 

Participants with intermediate amyloid levels take part in the AHEAD A-3 trial—the first ever trial aimed at what may be the earliest signs of Alzheimer’s disease. Participants in the AHEAD A-3 trial will receive BAN2401 (lecanemab) once every 4 weeks for 4 years.

Participants with elevated amyloid levels take part in the AHEAD A-45 trial. Participants in the AHEAD A-45 trial will receive BAN2401 (lecanemab) once every 2 weeks for about 2 years and then once every 4 weeks for the remainder of the study.

Participants in both trials will receive intravenous (IV) infusions of BAN2401 (lecanemab), tailored to their risk of developing memory loss, or a placebo, an inactive substance designed to mimic the appearance of the drug. The infusion takes approximately 60 minutes.

At different points in the study, participants have a PET scan (or Positron Emission Tomography brain scan), to look at amyloid and tau (another protein) in their brain. This helps the participants and researchers track their health and this is the first study of its kind to use PET scans to measure amyloid and tau in all participants. The PET scan takes pictures of participants’ brains, allowing researchers to see and track changes in amyloid and tau levels.

 

ELIGIBILITY

Participants Eligible for the AHEAD Study:

Are healthy adults ages 55-80.

Have not been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia.

Have a study partner, either a close relative or friend, who will participate in one study visit per year.

Have elevated or intermediate levels of amyloid in their brain, found by imaging as part of the study.

Learn More

 

PARTICIPATION REQUIREMENTS

Learn about what you will do as a study participant

 

UW ADRC Site Contact:

Darla Chapman, ARNP

Email: darlac@uw.edu

Phone: 206-744-9337

 

UW ADRC Site PI:

Charles Bernick, MD, MPH, Director of Clinical Trials, MBWC

For More Information

MAP: Metformin in Alzheimer’s Dementia Prevention

 JOIN US IN OUR FIGHT TO HELP PREVENT DEMENTIA 

MAP: Metformin in Alzheimer's Dementia Prevention is a research study looking at an existing drug used for diabetes prevention. The study tests if this drug can help prevent a decline in memory and thinking abilities for people with mild memory problems. It is a randomized study in which you will take either metformin (Glucophage® XR) or a placebo. 

Randomized means you will have an equal opportunity of getting the study drug or placebo. A placebo is a pill that looks the same as the study drug, but has no medicine. 

There will be no charge to you for the study drug or study visits. 

Taking part in this study is completely voluntary. We appreciate your participation. 

MAP is a multi-center study, where people can take part in the study at 11 locations throughout the United States. It is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) through the National Institute on Aging (NIA). Our researchers are experienced in running research studies. They are also experts in the field of memory loss, dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease. We invite you to join us in our search for treatments to improve the lives of those with memory problems due to Alzheimer’s disease. 

 

 You may be able to join if: 

  • you are 55-90 years old, 
  • you or your loved ones have noticed some changes in your memory, and 
  • you are not already being treated for diabetes or dementia 

 

Potential benefits:

  • You will receive some of your blood test results. We can also share these results with your healthcare provider.
  • Your participation may improve the prevention of dementia for future generations.

 

Taking part in MAP is voluntary and will not affect the care you receive.  If you decide to join, you will be compensated for your time. You may earn up to $850 for completing all study-related visits. 

 

To learn more about the MAP study, please contact our local UW study coordinator: 

Hanson Research Team 

(206) 744-1851 or (206) 897-5393

hansonlab@uw.edu 

 

Visit us at: https://www.iths.org/participate/metformin-in-alzheimers-dementia-prevention-map/


PoND: Prazosin and CSF Biomarkers in Aging, MCI and AD

We are seeking healthy, medically stable volunteers over the age of 45 who do not have memory problems for a new approach to preventing Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

Details

  • The study includes an assessment of your physical and mental health.
  • You will receive prazosin (a pill used for posttraumatic stress disorder and high blood pressure).
  • The study will take about 14 hours, spread over roughly 9 visits during a 3-month period.
  • These visits will be at the Seattle VA.
  • You will be compensated for each of your visits, with the total compensation for the study amounting to $750 to $825.

Key Researcher: The PI of this study is Murray Raskind at S-116-MIRECC, 1660 S. Columbian Way, Seattle, WA  98108.

Study Contact: 206.277.1491 or 1.800.329.8387 ext. 1491 

For More Information

Prazosin and CSF Biomarkers in mTBI

Prazosin and CSF Biomarkers in mTBI

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) from explosions is the "signature injury" of Veterans who have deployed to the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Although the immediate effects of a single mTBI usually resolve over days or weeks, multiple mTBIs can lead to both persistent symptoms and, years later, to two fatal progressive brain diseases, chronic traumatic encephalopathy and Alzheimer's disease. It is believed that these diseases are caused by nerve damaging chemicals called tau and beta amyloid produced by the brain but which are not removed from the brain in a normal manner in persons with mTBIs. The investigators will determine in Veterans who experienced mTBIs whether a clinically available drug called prazosin increases removal of tau and beta amyloid from the brain. This will be accomplished by seeing if prazosin reduces the amount of tau and beta amyloid in the spinal fluid that surrounds the brain. If the investigators find such reductions, prazosin will be evaluated as a preventative treatment in future studies. (from Clinical Trials.gov)

 

Key researcher: Murray A Raskind, MD, VA Puget Sound Health Care System Seattle Division, Seattle, WA

Study Contacts: Rebecca C Hendrickson, MD | Rebecca.Hendrickson@va.gov | 206-277-5054

                         Hollie A Holmes | hollie.holmes@va.gov | (206) 277-6207

Trial Description on clinicaltrials.gov

For More Information

Athira ATH-1017 Trial

The clinical trials of ATH-1017 are evaluating if a new investigational drug is safe and effective in improving symptoms of mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease. ATH-1017 is designed to boost a repair and regenerative pathway for brain cells, promoting brain health and function. ATH-1017 represents a new approach to treat Alzheimer’s disease, targeting the root cause of memory decline by repairing the brain cells and rebuilding the brain networks.

 

You or a loved one may be eligible if you:

♦ Are between 55 and 85 years of age

♦ Have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease

♦ Have a reliable support person or caregiver who is willing to participate in study visits, report on daily activities and oversee or help you with taking ATH-1017

 

More Info

♦ You may receive a stipend to compensate for time and effort for study participation including meals, travel, etc.

♦ Study participation and study drug are free to all participants

*The safety and efficacy of ATH-1017 for the treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer’s has not been previously established. Talk to your doctor about participating in Athira’s clinical trials of ATH-1017.

♦The study drug is administered once daily via subcutaneous injection using a prefilled syringe (i.e. small injection under the skin that you can take at home; the injection is prepared and ready for administration).

♦ The overall treatment duration will last about 6 months. A reliable caregiver or support person is required for study participation, to attend the clinical visits, answer questions from the study doctors, and help administer or supervise dosing of the study drug.

 

UW Study Contact

Sarah Simon at 206-744-0446 or  ssimon3@uw.edu


Green Memory (GV-971)

 A Phase 3, Multi-center, Randomized, Double-blind, Parallel-group, Placebo-controlled Clinical Trial to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Sodium Oligomannate (GV-971) in Treatment of Mild to Moderate Alzheimer's Disease (GREEN MEMORY: GREen Valley 971 EvaluatioN Memory)

The GREEN MEMORY Study is looking at an investigational medication, taken by mouth, for people with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease. The investigational medication is designed to restore the natural balance of bacteria in the gut. There are certain bacteria that are thought to cause inflammation in the brain and nerves, possibly contributing to Alzheimer's disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability and efficacy of GV-971 in mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease.

 

You may be eligible if you:

  • are between 50 and 85 years of age
  • are experiencing memory issues or have been diagnosed with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease.
  • have a study partner who knows you well, is with you three or more days a week, and can come to all study-related visits.

 

What to expect:

The study is made up of 4 parts: A screening period (to see if the study is right for you), 2 study treatment periods, and a follow-up period.

The Green Memory study involves a year of treatment with as few as seven clinic visits to Harborview Medical Center and additional research visits conducted by telephone. During the treatment period, 50% of participants will receive the investigational medication in pill form while 50% of participants will receive a placebo (an inactive medication). Every participant may be eligible to receive the investigational medication for 26 weeks after completion of their initial year of study participation. This investigational medication has been approved for use treating Alzheimer’s disease outside the U.S., and the Green Memory study is now being tested in the U.S. There is no cost to participate. Approximately 80 research clinics across North America are working on the Green Memory study.

 

Learn more:

Study website

Listing on ClinicalTrials.gov

 

UW ADRC Study Contact

Azma Parhin, MD, Research Coordinator, UW ADRC

Phone: 206-897-6350

Email: azmap@uw.edu

For More Information

PEACE-AD: Prazosin for Disruptive Agitation in Alzheimer’s Disease

The goal of the PEACE-AD clinical trial is to identify a well-tolerated treatment for people with severe agitation in the later stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). If you are a family member, caregiver, or friend of a person with AD who frequently experiences disruptive behavior, you may be aware that current treatment approaches to agitation in the advanced stages of AD are not optimal.

PEACE-AD is a phase II, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of the drug prazosin for disruptive agitation in Alzheimer’s disease. The PEACE-AD trial is taking place at academic medical centers and private clinics across the US that specialize in AD research, treatment and care. PEACE-AD investigators will enroll 80 participants who are living at home, with full time caregiving, or living in memory and long term care communities participating in the PEACE-AD trial.

Eligibility:

  • Males and females with probable or possible AD
  • Participants must be experiencing agitation that disrupts their daily life
  • Must live at home, with full-time caregiving, or in a memory or long term care community participating in PEACE-AD
  • Must have a study partner/caregiver available (home dwelling participants only)
  • Must not be bed bound
  • No major neurological disorder or unstable illness (other than AD)

 

UW ADRC Clinical Trial Coordinator:

Sarah Simon

Email: ssimon3@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 744-0446

 

PEACE-AD Clinical Trial Website

For More Information

ADRC Clinical Core

Who we are

The UW Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC) is part of a nationwide network of research centers funded by the National Institute on Aging to learn more about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.  We are exploring innovative approaches to diagnosis, treatment, and disease prevention by partnering with people who have normal memory and thinking and those who have memory concerns or are living with dementia.  

In order to learn more about diseases that cause memory loss and dementia, we are looking for volunteers from a variety of ethnic backgrounds and ages who are willing to participate in research.  It is important to study a diverse group of people so that the information we learn will benefit everyone.

 

Who we are seeking

The UW ADRC is interested in partnering with:

-People from underrepresented groups, such as African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians and Alaskan Natives.  

-People diagnosed with memory and thinking (cognitive) changes by their medical provider, especially a diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment

-We are also interested in partnering with people from any ethnic background who are 85 years or older and who do not have concerns about their memory or thinking. 

 

What to expect at a UW ADRC research visit

This study involves a yearly visit during which volunteers complete tests of their memory and thinking, have a brief physical and neurological examination, and answer questions about their medical history, memory, mood, and ability to perform daily activities. Volunteers must also have a study partner who knows them well and would notice changes in their memory, mood or ability to perform daily activities.  

We may also ask some volunteers for a blood or cerebral spinal fluid sample in order to learn more about how our bodies change in response to normal aging and dementia.

To learn more about participating, contact: UW ADRC at 206-744-0588,  uwadrc@uw.edu

For More Information

Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Study NIA- LOAD

We are studying families with histories of dementia to understand the genetic components behind Alzheimer’s disease. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements: 

-Have living family member(s) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you 

-Are willing to be contacted every  1-2 years to complete memory testing and an interview, both of which can be completed over the phone

 

Contact

For more information, please contact the Research Coordinator at 206.277.1024

 

Study Leader

Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Adjunct Professor, Epidemiology
Director, GRECC, VISN-20 Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center
Psychiatrist, Clinical Core,  ADRC

For More Information

Technology for Early Dementia Diagnosis

Researchers at the VA Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Centers are studying wearable technologies that may be useful to help diagnose Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

ELIGIBILITY

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements:

-Have a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease or probable dementia with Lewy Bodies

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you

-Have at least 8 years of education

 

COMPENSATION

Volunteers who complete this study will receive up to $250 in appreciation for their time and participation.

 

CONTACT

Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

Study PI: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW


The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The purpose of the Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium is to develop a collection of samples from individuals diagnosed with dementia with lewy bodies (DLB), dementia with lewy bodies/mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or Parkinson's disease dementia who will be followed over time. The consortium will collect detailed clinical information, biospecimens, and imaging data. Led by top leaders in the field, this consortium will fill the gap in resources available for biomarker development in Lewy Body Dementia and promote additional future research by having a readily available subject sample. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you:

-Have a diagnosis of probable dementia with lewy body/MCI or Parkinson's disease dementia

-Have a study partner who is able and willing to comply with required study procedures

-Have at least eight years of education

The study doctor will also check for other medical conditions or reasons that might prevent you from participating in the study

 

Study Leader: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW

Seattle Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

For More Information

AHEAD Study (BAN2401)

The AHEAD Study is testing whether an investigational treatment can lower people’s risk of memory loss due to Alzheimer’s disease.

Researchers have learned that changes in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease start as many as 20 years before they notice symptoms like memory problems. During those two decades, a protein in the brain called “amyloid” builds up in people who go on to have memory problems because of Alzheimer’s disease. While not all people with amyloid in their brain will develop memory problems, we know that the people who do are at a higher risk for developing the disease.

The study is funded by the National Institutes of Health, in partnership with the pharmaceutical company Eisai. It is being conducted by the NIH-funded Alzheimer’s Clinical Trial Consortium (ACTC), a network of leading academic Alzheimer’s research centers.

 

WHAT IS THE AHEAD STUDY?

The AHEAD Study is comprised of two different clinical trials testing the same investigational drug (known as BAN2401 (lecanemab)) in people who may be at risk for memory problems. Participants will receive personalized study treatment, instead of a one-size-fits-all approach. Study participants are enrolled in one of two AHEAD trials based on the level of amyloid in their brain: 

Participants with intermediate amyloid levels take part in the AHEAD A-3 trial—the first ever trial aimed at what may be the earliest signs of Alzheimer’s disease. Participants in the AHEAD A-3 trial will receive BAN2401 (lecanemab) once every 4 weeks for 4 years.

Participants with elevated amyloid levels take part in the AHEAD A-45 trial. Participants in the AHEAD A-45 trial will receive BAN2401 (lecanemab) once every 2 weeks for about 2 years and then once every 4 weeks for the remainder of the study.

Participants in both trials will receive intravenous (IV) infusions of BAN2401 (lecanemab), tailored to their risk of developing memory loss, or a placebo, an inactive substance designed to mimic the appearance of the drug. The infusion takes approximately 60 minutes.

At different points in the study, participants have a PET scan (or Positron Emission Tomography brain scan), to look at amyloid and tau (another protein) in their brain. This helps the participants and researchers track their health and this is the first study of its kind to use PET scans to measure amyloid and tau in all participants. The PET scan takes pictures of participants’ brains, allowing researchers to see and track changes in amyloid and tau levels.

 

ELIGIBILITY

Participants Eligible for the AHEAD Study:

Are healthy adults ages 55-80.

Have not been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia.

Have a study partner, either a close relative or friend, who will participate in one study visit per year.

Have elevated or intermediate levels of amyloid in their brain, found by imaging as part of the study.

Learn More

 

PARTICIPATION REQUIREMENTS

Learn about what you will do as a study participant

 

UW ADRC Site Contact:

Darla Chapman, ARNP

Email: darlac@uw.edu

Phone: 206-744-9337

 

UW ADRC Site PI:

Charles Bernick, MD, MPH, Director of Clinical Trials, MBWC

For More Information

All Studies and Trials

ADRC Clinical Core

Who we are

The UW Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC) is part of a nationwide network of research centers funded by the National Institute on Aging to learn more about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.  We are exploring innovative approaches to diagnosis, treatment, and disease prevention by partnering with people who have normal memory and thinking and those who have memory concerns or are living with dementia.  

In order to learn more about diseases that cause memory loss and dementia, we are looking for volunteers from a variety of ethnic backgrounds and ages who are willing to participate in research.  It is important to study a diverse group of people so that the information we learn will benefit everyone.

 

Who we are seeking

The UW ADRC is interested in partnering with:

-People from underrepresented groups, such as African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians and Alaskan Natives.  

-People diagnosed with memory and thinking (cognitive) changes by their medical provider, especially a diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment

-We are also interested in partnering with people from any ethnic background who are 85 years or older and who do not have concerns about their memory or thinking. 

 

What to expect at a UW ADRC research visit

This study involves a yearly visit during which volunteers complete tests of their memory and thinking, have a brief physical and neurological examination, and answer questions about their medical history, memory, mood, and ability to perform daily activities. Volunteers must also have a study partner who knows them well and would notice changes in their memory, mood or ability to perform daily activities.  

We may also ask some volunteers for a blood or cerebral spinal fluid sample in order to learn more about how our bodies change in response to normal aging and dementia.

To learn more about participating, contact: UW ADRC at 206-744-0588,  uwadrc@uw.edu

For More Information

Aging with Pride: IDEA (Innovations in Dementia Empowerment and Action for LGBTQ people)

Aging with Pride: IDEA (Innovations in Dementia Empowerment and Action) is an exercise and problem-solving program for older adults with memory loss and the people who help them. 

The study is the first federally-funded project testing a program designed to improve quality of life for LGBTQ people who experience memory loss or who help those experiencing memory loss. Participants are compensated for their time.

The study has expanded enrollment to  all 50 states. Older adults with memory loss can participate with an informal care partner, who may be a spouse or partner, friend, family member, or anyone who assists them. Either the person with memory loss or the person who helps them (or both) must be LGBTQ. Participants meet with a coach to learn exercises and strategies related to memory loss. The program includes 9 in-person sessions with the coach over 6 weeks, with follow-up phone calls. 

IDEA is led by University of Washington School of Social Work professor Karen Fredriksen Goldsen and UW Nursing professor Linda Teri. Dr. Fredriksen Goldsen is the primary investigator for Aging with Pride: National Health, Aging, and Sexuality/Gender Study (NHAS), the first national longitudinal study of health and well-being in LGBTQ older adults, and Dr. Teri pioneered the RDAD (Reducing Disabilities in Alzheimer’s Disease) program, which has been shown to improve quality of life for people with memory loss and reduce rates of institutionalization.

Contact: 

Phone: 1-888-655-6646

Email: ageIDEA@uw.edu

AHEAD Study (BAN2401)

The AHEAD Study is testing whether an investigational treatment can lower people’s risk of memory loss due to Alzheimer’s disease.

Researchers have learned that changes in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease start as many as 20 years before they notice symptoms like memory problems. During those two decades, a protein in the brain called “amyloid” builds up in people who go on to have memory problems because of Alzheimer’s disease. While not all people with amyloid in their brain will develop memory problems, we know that the people who do are at a higher risk for developing the disease.

The study is funded by the National Institutes of Health, in partnership with the pharmaceutical company Eisai. It is being conducted by the NIH-funded Alzheimer’s Clinical Trial Consortium (ACTC), a network of leading academic Alzheimer’s research centers.

 

WHAT IS THE AHEAD STUDY?

The AHEAD Study is comprised of two different clinical trials testing the same investigational drug (known as BAN2401 (lecanemab)) in people who may be at risk for memory problems. Participants will receive personalized study treatment, instead of a one-size-fits-all approach. Study participants are enrolled in one of two AHEAD trials based on the level of amyloid in their brain: 

Participants with intermediate amyloid levels take part in the AHEAD A-3 trial—the first ever trial aimed at what may be the earliest signs of Alzheimer’s disease. Participants in the AHEAD A-3 trial will receive BAN2401 (lecanemab) once every 4 weeks for 4 years.

Participants with elevated amyloid levels take part in the AHEAD A-45 trial. Participants in the AHEAD A-45 trial will receive BAN2401 (lecanemab) once every 2 weeks for about 2 years and then once every 4 weeks for the remainder of the study.

Participants in both trials will receive intravenous (IV) infusions of BAN2401 (lecanemab), tailored to their risk of developing memory loss, or a placebo, an inactive substance designed to mimic the appearance of the drug. The infusion takes approximately 60 minutes.

At different points in the study, participants have a PET scan (or Positron Emission Tomography brain scan), to look at amyloid and tau (another protein) in their brain. This helps the participants and researchers track their health and this is the first study of its kind to use PET scans to measure amyloid and tau in all participants. The PET scan takes pictures of participants’ brains, allowing researchers to see and track changes in amyloid and tau levels.

 

ELIGIBILITY

Participants Eligible for the AHEAD Study:

Are healthy adults ages 55-80.

Have not been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia.

Have a study partner, either a close relative or friend, who will participate in one study visit per year.

Have elevated or intermediate levels of amyloid in their brain, found by imaging as part of the study.

Learn More

 

PARTICIPATION REQUIREMENTS

Learn about what you will do as a study participant

 

UW ADRC Site Contact:

Darla Chapman, ARNP

Email: darlac@uw.edu

Phone: 206-744-9337

 

UW ADRC Site PI:

Charles Bernick, MD, MPH, Director of Clinical Trials, MBWC

For More Information

Athira ATH-1017 Trial

The clinical trials of ATH-1017 are evaluating if a new investigational drug is safe and effective in improving symptoms of mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease. ATH-1017 is designed to boost a repair and regenerative pathway for brain cells, promoting brain health and function. ATH-1017 represents a new approach to treat Alzheimer’s disease, targeting the root cause of memory decline by repairing the brain cells and rebuilding the brain networks.

 

You or a loved one may be eligible if you:

♦ Are between 55 and 85 years of age

♦ Have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease

♦ Have a reliable support person or caregiver who is willing to participate in study visits, report on daily activities and oversee or help you with taking ATH-1017

 

More Info

♦ You may receive a stipend to compensate for time and effort for study participation including meals, travel, etc.

♦ Study participation and study drug are free to all participants

*The safety and efficacy of ATH-1017 for the treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer’s has not been previously established. Talk to your doctor about participating in Athira’s clinical trials of ATH-1017.

♦The study drug is administered once daily via subcutaneous injection using a prefilled syringe (i.e. small injection under the skin that you can take at home; the injection is prepared and ready for administration).

♦ The overall treatment duration will last about 6 months. A reliable caregiver or support person is required for study participation, to attend the clinical visits, answer questions from the study doctors, and help administer or supervise dosing of the study drug.

 

UW Study Contact

Sarah Simon at 206-744-0446 or  ssimon3@uw.edu

Green Memory (GV-971)

 A Phase 3, Multi-center, Randomized, Double-blind, Parallel-group, Placebo-controlled Clinical Trial to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Sodium Oligomannate (GV-971) in Treatment of Mild to Moderate Alzheimer's Disease (GREEN MEMORY: GREen Valley 971 EvaluatioN Memory)

The GREEN MEMORY Study is looking at an investigational medication, taken by mouth, for people with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease. The investigational medication is designed to restore the natural balance of bacteria in the gut. There are certain bacteria that are thought to cause inflammation in the brain and nerves, possibly contributing to Alzheimer's disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability and efficacy of GV-971 in mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease.

 

You may be eligible if you:

  • are between 50 and 85 years of age
  • are experiencing memory issues or have been diagnosed with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease.
  • have a study partner who knows you well, is with you three or more days a week, and can come to all study-related visits.

 

What to expect:

The study is made up of 4 parts: A screening period (to see if the study is right for you), 2 study treatment periods, and a follow-up period.

The Green Memory study involves a year of treatment with as few as seven clinic visits to Harborview Medical Center and additional research visits conducted by telephone. During the treatment period, 50% of participants will receive the investigational medication in pill form while 50% of participants will receive a placebo (an inactive medication). Every participant may be eligible to receive the investigational medication for 26 weeks after completion of their initial year of study participation. This investigational medication has been approved for use treating Alzheimer’s disease outside the U.S., and the Green Memory study is now being tested in the U.S. There is no cost to participate. Approximately 80 research clinics across North America are working on the Green Memory study.

 

Learn more:

Study website

Listing on ClinicalTrials.gov

 

UW ADRC Study Contact

Azma Parhin, MD, Research Coordinator, UW ADRC

Phone: 206-897-6350

Email: azmap@uw.edu

For More Information

Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Study NIA- LOAD

We are studying families with histories of dementia to understand the genetic components behind Alzheimer’s disease. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements: 

-Have living family member(s) with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you 

-Are willing to be contacted every  1-2 years to complete memory testing and an interview, both of which can be completed over the phone

 

Contact

For more information, please contact the Research Coordinator at 206.277.1024

 

Study Leader

Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Adjunct Professor, Epidemiology
Director, GRECC, VISN-20 Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center
Psychiatrist, Clinical Core,  ADRC

For More Information

Latino Caregiver Research Study

Latino Caregiver Research Study (Spanish/English translations below)

 

Investigadores de la Universidad de Washington están desarrollando un programa para apoyar a cuidadores de familiares con enfermedad de Alzheimer o demencias relacionadas. Están interesados en hablar con familiares o amigos cercanos que son cuidadores de personas con demencia que tengan problemas de comportamiento como depresión, discusiones o rehusarse a bañarse y vestirse. 

Su participación es voluntaria y confidencial.

 

Buscamos personas que cumplan los siguientes requisitos:

-Se identifique como Hispano/Latino

-Cuiden a un familiar o amigo cercano con diagnóstico de enfermedad de Alzheimer u otra demencia r-elacionada

-Su familiar tiene problemas de comportamiento

 

Para participar necesita:

-Completar una encuesta (10 minutos) y participar en una entrevista por teléfono o Zoom.

-Recibirá una compensación de $45 en agradecimiento a su tiempo

 

Para participar en el estudio o recibir más información, favor de comunicarse con la Miriana Duran: mdp19@uw.edu ó 206-221-6206

 

______

Researchers at the University of Washington are developing a program to support family (or close friend) caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia. They are interested in speaking with family caregivers that are caring for individuals experiencing behavior issues such as trying to leave the house, arguing, or refusing to bathe or get dressed.

Research is always voluntary.

 

This study might be a good fit for you if you:

-Identify as Hispanic/Latino

-Take care of a family member or close friend diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia

- Have a family member or close friend who is experiencing behavior issues

 

If you decide to take part in the research study:

-You will need to complete a 10 minute survey and a 1 hour interview by phone or Zoom.

-You will receive $45 to thank you for your time and effort

 

To learn more about the study, please contact Miriana Duran: mdp19@uw.edu or 206-221-6206

MAP: Metformin in Alzheimer’s Dementia Prevention

 JOIN US IN OUR FIGHT TO HELP PREVENT DEMENTIA 

MAP: Metformin in Alzheimer's Dementia Prevention is a research study looking at an existing drug used for diabetes prevention. The study tests if this drug can help prevent a decline in memory and thinking abilities for people with mild memory problems. It is a randomized study in which you will take either metformin (Glucophage® XR) or a placebo. 

Randomized means you will have an equal opportunity of getting the study drug or placebo. A placebo is a pill that looks the same as the study drug, but has no medicine. 

There will be no charge to you for the study drug or study visits. 

Taking part in this study is completely voluntary. We appreciate your participation. 

MAP is a multi-center study, where people can take part in the study at 11 locations throughout the United States. It is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) through the National Institute on Aging (NIA). Our researchers are experienced in running research studies. They are also experts in the field of memory loss, dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease. We invite you to join us in our search for treatments to improve the lives of those with memory problems due to Alzheimer’s disease. 

 

 You may be able to join if: 

  • you are 55-90 years old, 
  • you or your loved ones have noticed some changes in your memory, and 
  • you are not already being treated for diabetes or dementia 

 

Potential benefits:

  • You will receive some of your blood test results. We can also share these results with your healthcare provider.
  • Your participation may improve the prevention of dementia for future generations.

 

Taking part in MAP is voluntary and will not affect the care you receive.  If you decide to join, you will be compensated for your time. You may earn up to $850 for completing all study-related visits. 

 

To learn more about the MAP study, please contact our local UW study coordinator: 

Hanson Research Team 

(206) 744-1851 or (206) 897-5393

hansonlab@uw.edu 

 

Visit us at: https://www.iths.org/participate/metformin-in-alzheimers-dementia-prevention-map/

Meal and Memory Study

APOE genotype and diet influences on Alzheimer's biomarkers

We are learning more and more about the risks for Alzheimer's disease every year, and that includes learning what foods are best at promoting brain health. It might be more complicated than 'this food is good or bad.' Dr. Angela Hanson, a geriatric physician at the University of Washington, is conducting a study that examines how a risk gene for Alzheimer's disease might affect people's memory and metabolic responses to different meals. Her preliminary work showed that people who carry the gene APOE4 (E4) responded differently to different Alzheimer's treatments and diets, compared to people who did not carry this gene. Dr. Hanson plans to study this further with the "Meal and Memory Study” in adults age 55 and older who do not have dementia. 

 

Eligibility: Participants may be men or women, ages 55 and older. People who have known dementia, or known diabetes, are not eligible.

 

Key researcher:  Angela Hanson, MD

Study Contact: Angela Hanson at 206-897-5393 or hansonaj@uw.edu

For More Information

PEACE-AD: Prazosin for Disruptive Agitation in Alzheimer’s Disease

The goal of the PEACE-AD clinical trial is to identify a well-tolerated treatment for people with severe agitation in the later stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). If you are a family member, caregiver, or friend of a person with AD who frequently experiences disruptive behavior, you may be aware that current treatment approaches to agitation in the advanced stages of AD are not optimal.

PEACE-AD is a phase II, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of the drug prazosin for disruptive agitation in Alzheimer’s disease. The PEACE-AD trial is taking place at academic medical centers and private clinics across the US that specialize in AD research, treatment and care. PEACE-AD investigators will enroll 80 participants who are living at home, with full time caregiving, or living in memory and long term care communities participating in the PEACE-AD trial.

Eligibility:

  • Males and females with probable or possible AD
  • Participants must be experiencing agitation that disrupts their daily life
  • Must live at home, with full-time caregiving, or in a memory or long term care community participating in PEACE-AD
  • Must have a study partner/caregiver available (home dwelling participants only)
  • Must not be bed bound
  • No major neurological disorder or unstable illness (other than AD)

 

UW ADRC Clinical Trial Coordinator:

Sarah Simon

Email: ssimon3@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 744-0446

 

PEACE-AD Clinical Trial Website

For More Information

PoND: Prazosin and CSF Biomarkers in Aging, MCI and AD

We are seeking healthy, medically stable volunteers over the age of 45 who do not have memory problems for a new approach to preventing Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

Details

  • The study includes an assessment of your physical and mental health.
  • You will receive prazosin (a pill used for posttraumatic stress disorder and high blood pressure).
  • The study will take about 14 hours, spread over roughly 9 visits during a 3-month period.
  • These visits will be at the Seattle VA.
  • You will be compensated for each of your visits, with the total compensation for the study amounting to $750 to $825.

Key Researcher: The PI of this study is Murray Raskind at S-116-MIRECC, 1660 S. Columbian Way, Seattle, WA  98108.

Study Contact: 206.277.1491 or 1.800.329.8387 ext. 1491 

For More Information

Prazosin and CSF Biomarkers in mTBI

Prazosin and CSF Biomarkers in mTBI

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) from explosions is the "signature injury" of Veterans who have deployed to the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Although the immediate effects of a single mTBI usually resolve over days or weeks, multiple mTBIs can lead to both persistent symptoms and, years later, to two fatal progressive brain diseases, chronic traumatic encephalopathy and Alzheimer's disease. It is believed that these diseases are caused by nerve damaging chemicals called tau and beta amyloid produced by the brain but which are not removed from the brain in a normal manner in persons with mTBIs. The investigators will determine in Veterans who experienced mTBIs whether a clinically available drug called prazosin increases removal of tau and beta amyloid from the brain. This will be accomplished by seeing if prazosin reduces the amount of tau and beta amyloid in the spinal fluid that surrounds the brain. If the investigators find such reductions, prazosin will be evaluated as a preventative treatment in future studies. (from Clinical Trials.gov)

 

Key researcher: Murray A Raskind, MD, VA Puget Sound Health Care System Seattle Division, Seattle, WA

Study Contacts: Rebecca C Hendrickson, MD | Rebecca.Hendrickson@va.gov | 206-277-5054

                         Hollie A Holmes | hollie.holmes@va.gov | (206) 277-6207

Trial Description on clinicaltrials.gov

For More Information

Technology for Early Dementia Diagnosis

Researchers at the VA Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Centers are studying wearable technologies that may be useful to help diagnose Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

ELIGIBILITY

You may qualify for this study if you meet these requirements:

-Have a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease or probable dementia with Lewy Bodies

-Have a friend, family member, or caretaker who is able and willing to answer questions about you

-Have at least 8 years of education

 

COMPENSATION

Volunteers who complete this study will receive up to $250 in appreciation for their time and participation.

 

CONTACT

Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

Study PI: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The purpose of the Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium is to develop a collection of samples from individuals diagnosed with dementia with lewy bodies (DLB), dementia with lewy bodies/mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or Parkinson's disease dementia who will be followed over time. The consortium will collect detailed clinical information, biospecimens, and imaging data. Led by top leaders in the field, this consortium will fill the gap in resources available for biomarker development in Lewy Body Dementia and promote additional future research by having a readily available subject sample. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you:

-Have a diagnosis of probable dementia with lewy body/MCI or Parkinson's disease dementia

-Have a study partner who is able and willing to comply with required study procedures

-Have at least eight years of education

The study doctor will also check for other medical conditions or reasons that might prevent you from participating in the study

 

Study Leader: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW

Seattle Study Contact: Sarah Payne | 206.277.1379

For More Information

The Remote Cog Study

Researchers at the VA Puget Sound Hospital in Seattle are seeking volunteers for the Remote Cog Study. Black Americans often miss out on early care that can help with memory and mental health changes. We hope to learn how to spot these changes earlier in Black Americans.

We are enrolling Black Americans who are age 65+, concerned about their memory, and interested in a 10-week research study from the comfort of their own homes that includes: 

 

Answering health-related questions using paper, a telephone, and a mobile device 

Using several devices at home, including a wristwatch, thermometer, and blood pressure monitor 

Providing a blood sample 

 

Learn more

Please contact us at (206) 277-1379 for more information.

The lead researcher of this study is Dr. Debby Tsuang at S182 GRECC, VA Puget Sound, 1660 S. Columbian Way, Seattle WA 98108.

For More Information