Clinical Trials and Studies

The University of Washington’s Memory and Brain Wellness Center/Alzheimer's Disease Research Center serves as a site for international clinical trials and studies of potential treatments, prevention strategies, and new diagnostic approaches for Alzheimer’s disease and related neurodegenerative conditions, such as frontotemporal degeneration and Lewy Body dementia/Parkinson's disease dementia, open for enrollment at UW Medicine. This page provides information about these studies and how you can learn more or participate. New trials appear over time, and these may involve other groups of patients. We think of study participants as our partners in the effort to find a prevention for neurological conditions that lead to dementia.

Clinical studies provide a controlled and monitored environment where volunteer research participants can safely take experimental medication. Most of the trials at our center are placebo-controlled, double-blind studies, meaning that there is a chance that participants will be on the experimental medication or on a placebo (a substance that looks the same but contains no medication).

For expanded information about participating in Alzheimer disease research studies at the UW, please visit Participating in Research and Brain Donation.

Guide to Clinical Trials and Studies at the UW

You may be eligible if you have:

Neuroimaging and Function Study

The purpose of this UW Department of Rehabilitation Medicine study is to examine the relationship between brain regions, physical performance and cognitive function in older adults with memory problems.  The study involves two visits (one year apart) to the University of Washington Health Sciences Center.  At the first visit a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is taken of the brain.  Walking, balance and memory tests are completed.  At the second visit only walking, balance and memory tests are completed. Taxi transportation is provided if needed.  Participants receive $50 for the first visit and $30 for the second visit.

 

Key Researcher: Ellen McGough, PhD, UW Assistant Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine

Study Coordinator: Monica Smersh

Study Contact Number: 206-598-6139 or 206-616-5550

For More Information

MIND: Memory Improvement Through Nicotine Dosing

MIND: A National Research Treatment Study for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): Memory Improvement Through Nicotine Dosing

The purpose of this study is to determine whether daily transdermal nicotine (patch) will have a positive effect on early memory impairment in participants diagnosed with MCI.  This study, which will take place at multiple sites across the U.S., will consist of 12 visits over a 2-year period. 

 

Eligibility

Healthy, non-smoking adults, ages 55+, who either notice changes in their memory or whose family members notice memory changes may be eligible to participate.  The purpose of this study is to determine whether nicotine (in patch form) improves memory and functioning in adults diagnosed with MCI. Participants  will have extensive memory & cognitive testing as part of the screening process. Those who meet the study qualifications will be placed on either daily nicotine or placebo (inactive ingredient) patches. Some study sites will additionally conduct an MRI (brain scan) in addition to the regular study procedures.

Participants are required to have a study partner who will accompany them to each appointment.  This partner may be a family member, close friend, or caregiver.  This person must be someone that knows the participant well and spends a minimum of 10 hours a week with them.  This is necessary in order for the partner to give the research staff feedback on the participant’s memory, health, & functioning throughout the study.

Learn More: MIND Study Website and Frequently Asked Questions

 

Seattle Study Contact: Michael Persenaire mpersena@uw.edu

For More Information

Neuroimaging and Function Study

The purpose of this UW Department of Rehabilitation Medicine study is to examine the relationship between brain regions, physical performance and cognitive function in older adults with memory problems.  The study involves two visits (one year apart) to the University of Washington Health Sciences Center.  At the first visit a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is taken of the brain.  Walking, balance and memory tests are completed.  At the second visit only walking, balance and memory tests are completed. Taxi transportation is provided if needed.  Participants receive $50 for the first visit and $30 for the second visit.

 

Key Researcher: Ellen McGough, PhD, UW Assistant Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine

Study Coordinator: Monica Smersh

Study Contact Number: 206-598-6139 or 206-616-5550

For More Information

Meal and Memory Study

APOE genotype and diet influences on Alzheimer's biomarkers

We are learning more and more about the risks for Alzheimer's disease every year, and that includes learning what foods are best at promoting brain health. It might be more complicated than 'this food is good or bad.' Dr. Angela Hanson, a geriatric physician at the University of Washington, is conducting a study that examines how a risk gene for Alzheimer's disease might affect people's memory and metabolic responses to different meals. Her preliminary work showed that people who carry the gene APOE4 (E4) responded differently to different Alzheimer's treatments and diets, compared to people who did not carry this gene. Dr. Hanson plans to study this further with the “Meal and Memory Study” in adults age 55 and older who do not have dementia. 

 

Eligibility: Participants may be men or women, ages 55 and older. People who have known dementia, or known diabetes, are not eligible.

 

Key researcher:  Angela Hanson, MD

Study Contact: Angela Hanson at 206-897-5393 or hansonaj@uw.edu

For More Information

DIAN-TU

*Not Currently Enrolling

The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network Trials Unit (DIAN-TU)

Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network Trial: An Opportunity to Prevent Dementia. A Study of Potential Disease Modifying Treatments in Individuals at Risk for or With a Type of Early Onset Alzheimer Disease Caused by a Genetic Mutation.

DIAN-TU is the first prevention trial for Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer’s Disease (ADAD) families. The DIAN-TU trial focuses on drugs that could potentially change the course of the disease. The goal is to determine the safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of these drugs. The DIAN-TU trial will determine if these medications can prevent, delay, or possibly even reverse Alzheimer’s disease changes in the brain.

Although there are differences between ADAD and the more common age-associated, sporadic Alzheimer’s disease, the results of the studies conducted by this unit will have implications for future studies and treatments in sporadic Alzheimer’s disease. Currently the DIAN-TU-001 treatment trial is the only ongoing, active clinical trial within the DIAN-TU. The Enrollment Criteria for this trial can be found on the trial brochure link below. As new trials become available, information will continue to be posted.

Key UW Researcher: Suman Jayadev, MD
Study Contact: The DIAN Expanded Registry at www.DIANexr.org or 1-844-DIAN-EXR (342-6397)

 
Eligibility

You may be eligible for DIAN-2 if you answer ‘Yes’ to all of the following:

  • Does your family have an ADAD mutation (PSEN1, PSEN2, or APP) for early onset Alzheimer’s disease (less than 60 years) in multiple generations?
  • Are you cognitively normal, or do you have mild dementia? Both are eligible for this prevention trial.
  • Are you between the ages 18 to 80?
  • Are you between 15 years younger to 10 years older than your parent was when they first showed the signs of Alzheimer’s disease?
  • Do you have a family member or friend that can accompany you to visits and provide information about your medical history?
For More Information

Advancing Research and Treatment for Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (ARTFL)

8101: Advancing Research and Treatment for Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration [ARTFL]: Research Projects 1 & 2

Background: Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD) is the neuropathological term for a related group of rare neurodegenerative disorders that cause a variety of impairments in social function and personality, cognitive ability, language, and motor function. In most cases, this disease begins when a person is in their 40s-60s. The prevalence of the behavioral and cognitive syndromes is approximately 15-22 per 100,000; the most common motor syndrome has a prevalence of 6.4 per 100,000 in the US. All FTLD disorders are regularly fatal and generally lead to death within 10 years of diagnosis, sometimes much faster. There are no effective treatments for any FTLD disorder, and it is hard to accurately diagnose or potentially measure the effectiveness of new therapies.

Research on the different FTLD disorders traditionally has been performed either by behavioral neurologists who focus on behavior, cognition and language, or by movement disorder neurologists who focus on movement abnormalities. There is a growing agreement that research needs to incorporate both to successfully develop effective therapies. The ARTFL consortium brings together leading behavioral and movement disorder researchers in North America to focus on studies that enable research for FTLD. (From ARTFL)

 

The primary objectives of this study are:

To build a reliable FTLD clinical research network to support treatment and clinical trials that focus on the prevention of FTLD.

To determine the clinical characteristics of sporadic FTLD syndromes in patients who would meet typical clinical trial eligibility criteria, and the barriers to clinical trial participation.

To develop a familial FTLD (f-FTLD) cohort for clinical trials and biomarker studies.

 

About this Study: This is an observational study of about 1560 individuals with FTLD syndromes. If you participate in this study, you will have an evaluation of your memory and thinking skills and have a physical examination by a neurologist. You and your study partner will complete some questionnaires. You will be asked to have a sample of blood drawn, and you may be asked to participate in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain or lumbar punctures for cerebrospinal fluid. The study staff may look at your medical records so that we can collect information about your medical history. Participation in the study will take a total of about 8 hours over the course of a day or may be split into two days. If FTLD runs in your family, you may be asked to return in one year for a follow-up visit where many of the assessments you completed during your first study visit will be repeated. (From ARTFL)

 

How to Participate: In order to participate in a study, you must personally contact the study coordinator of any of the participating institutions by phone or by e-mail. Please use the information below to inquire about participation at the UW site in Seattle, WA.

 

Key UW researcher: Kimiko Domoto-Reilly, MD

Study Coordinator: Christina Caso | cdcaso@uw.edu  | 206-221-9038

Trial Websites: ARTFL Research Projects 1&2 -or- ARFTL on ClinicalTrials.gov

For More Information

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The purpose of the Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium is to develop a collection of samples from individuals diagnosed with dementia with lewy bodies (DLB), dementia with lewy bodies/mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or Parkinson's disease dementia who will be followed over time. The consortium will collect detailed clinical information, biospecimens, and imaging data. Led by top leaders in the field, this consortium will fill the gap in resources available for biomarker development in Lewy Body Dementia and promote additional future research by having a readily available subject sample. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you:

-Have a diagnosis of probable dementia with lewy body/MCI or Parkinson's disease dementia

-Have a study partner who is able and willing to comply with required study procedures

-Have at least eight years of education

The study doctor will also check for other medical conditions or reasons that might prevent you from participating in the study

 

Study Leader: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW

Seattle Study Contact: Skye Challener | 206.277.3073

For More Information

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The purpose of the Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium is to develop a collection of samples from individuals diagnosed with dementia with lewy bodies (DLB), dementia with lewy bodies/mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or Parkinson's disease dementia who will be followed over time. The consortium will collect detailed clinical information, biospecimens, and imaging data. Led by top leaders in the field, this consortium will fill the gap in resources available for biomarker development in Lewy Body Dementia and promote additional future research by having a readily available subject sample. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you:

-Have a diagnosis of probable dementia with lewy body/MCI or Parkinson's disease dementia

-Have a study partner who is able and willing to comply with required study procedures

-Have at least eight years of education

The study doctor will also check for other medical conditions or reasons that might prevent you from participating in the study

 

Study Leader: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW

Seattle Study Contact: Skye Challener | 206.277.3073

For More Information

Sort by Trial Type

Neuroimaging and Function Study

The purpose of this UW Department of Rehabilitation Medicine study is to examine the relationship between brain regions, physical performance and cognitive function in older adults with memory problems.  The study involves two visits (one year apart) to the University of Washington Health Sciences Center.  At the first visit a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is taken of the brain.  Walking, balance and memory tests are completed.  At the second visit only walking, balance and memory tests are completed. Taxi transportation is provided if needed.  Participants receive $50 for the first visit and $30 for the second visit.

 

Key Researcher: Ellen McGough, PhD, UW Assistant Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine

Study Coordinator: Monica Smersh

Study Contact Number: 206-598-6139 or 206-616-5550

For More Information

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The purpose of the Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium is to develop a collection of samples from individuals diagnosed with dementia with lewy bodies (DLB), dementia with lewy bodies/mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or Parkinson's disease dementia who will be followed over time. The consortium will collect detailed clinical information, biospecimens, and imaging data. Led by top leaders in the field, this consortium will fill the gap in resources available for biomarker development in Lewy Body Dementia and promote additional future research by having a readily available subject sample. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you:

-Have a diagnosis of probable dementia with lewy body/MCI or Parkinson's disease dementia

-Have a study partner who is able and willing to comply with required study procedures

-Have at least eight years of education

The study doctor will also check for other medical conditions or reasons that might prevent you from participating in the study

 

Study Leader: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW

Seattle Study Contact: Skye Challener | 206.277.3073

For More Information

DIAN-TU

*Not Currently Enrolling

The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network Trials Unit (DIAN-TU)

Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network Trial: An Opportunity to Prevent Dementia. A Study of Potential Disease Modifying Treatments in Individuals at Risk for or With a Type of Early Onset Alzheimer Disease Caused by a Genetic Mutation.

DIAN-TU is the first prevention trial for Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer’s Disease (ADAD) families. The DIAN-TU trial focuses on drugs that could potentially change the course of the disease. The goal is to determine the safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of these drugs. The DIAN-TU trial will determine if these medications can prevent, delay, or possibly even reverse Alzheimer’s disease changes in the brain.

Although there are differences between ADAD and the more common age-associated, sporadic Alzheimer’s disease, the results of the studies conducted by this unit will have implications for future studies and treatments in sporadic Alzheimer’s disease. Currently the DIAN-TU-001 treatment trial is the only ongoing, active clinical trial within the DIAN-TU. The Enrollment Criteria for this trial can be found on the trial brochure link below. As new trials become available, information will continue to be posted.

Key UW Researcher: Suman Jayadev, MD
Study Contact: The DIAN Expanded Registry at www.DIANexr.org or 1-844-DIAN-EXR (342-6397)

 
Eligibility

You may be eligible for DIAN-2 if you answer ‘Yes’ to all of the following:

  • Does your family have an ADAD mutation (PSEN1, PSEN2, or APP) for early onset Alzheimer’s disease (less than 60 years) in multiple generations?
  • Are you cognitively normal, or do you have mild dementia? Both are eligible for this prevention trial.
  • Are you between the ages 18 to 80?
  • Are you between 15 years younger to 10 years older than your parent was when they first showed the signs of Alzheimer’s disease?
  • Do you have a family member or friend that can accompany you to visits and provide information about your medical history?
For More Information

MIND: Memory Improvement Through Nicotine Dosing

MIND: A National Research Treatment Study for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): Memory Improvement Through Nicotine Dosing

The purpose of this study is to determine whether daily transdermal nicotine (patch) will have a positive effect on early memory impairment in participants diagnosed with MCI.  This study, which will take place at multiple sites across the U.S., will consist of 12 visits over a 2-year period. 

 

Eligibility

Healthy, non-smoking adults, ages 55+, who either notice changes in their memory or whose family members notice memory changes may be eligible to participate.  The purpose of this study is to determine whether nicotine (in patch form) improves memory and functioning in adults diagnosed with MCI. Participants  will have extensive memory & cognitive testing as part of the screening process. Those who meet the study qualifications will be placed on either daily nicotine or placebo (inactive ingredient) patches. Some study sites will additionally conduct an MRI (brain scan) in addition to the regular study procedures.

Participants are required to have a study partner who will accompany them to each appointment.  This partner may be a family member, close friend, or caregiver.  This person must be someone that knows the participant well and spends a minimum of 10 hours a week with them.  This is necessary in order for the partner to give the research staff feedback on the participant’s memory, health, & functioning throughout the study.

Learn More: MIND Study Website and Frequently Asked Questions

 

Seattle Study Contact: Michael Persenaire mpersena@uw.edu

For More Information

Prazosin and CSF Biomarkers in mTBI (PoND)

Prazosin and CSF Biomarkers in mTBI (PoND)

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) from explosions is the “signature injury” of Veterans who have deployed to the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Although the immediate effects of a single mTBI usually resolve over days or weeks, multiple mTBIs can lead to both persistent symptoms and, years later, to two fatal progressive brain diseases, chronic traumatic encephalopathy and Alzheimer's disease. It is believed that these diseases are caused by nerve damaging chemicals called tau and beta amyloid produced by the brain but which are not removed from the brain in a normal manner in persons with mTBIs. The investigators will determine in Veterans who experienced mTBIs whether a clinically available drug called prazosin increases removal of tau and beta amyloid from the brain. This will be accomplished by seeing if prazosin reduces the amount of tau and beta amyloid in the spinal fluid that surrounds the brain. If the investigators find such reductions, prazosin will be evaluated as a preventative treatment in future studies. (from Clinical Trials.gov)

 

Key researcher: Murray A Raskind, MD, VA Puget Sound Health Care System Seattle Division, Seattle, WA

Study Contacts: Rebecca C Hendrickson, MD | Rebecca.Hendrickson@va.gov | 206-277-5054

                         Hollie A Holmes | hollie.holmes@va.gov | (206) 277-6207

Trial Description on clinicaltrials.gov

For More Information

MIND: Memory Improvement Through Nicotine Dosing

MIND: A National Research Treatment Study for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): Memory Improvement Through Nicotine Dosing

The purpose of this study is to determine whether daily transdermal nicotine (patch) will have a positive effect on early memory impairment in participants diagnosed with MCI.  This study, which will take place at multiple sites across the U.S., will consist of 12 visits over a 2-year period. 

 

Eligibility

Healthy, non-smoking adults, ages 55+, who either notice changes in their memory or whose family members notice memory changes may be eligible to participate.  The purpose of this study is to determine whether nicotine (in patch form) improves memory and functioning in adults diagnosed with MCI. Participants  will have extensive memory & cognitive testing as part of the screening process. Those who meet the study qualifications will be placed on either daily nicotine or placebo (inactive ingredient) patches. Some study sites will additionally conduct an MRI (brain scan) in addition to the regular study procedures.

Participants are required to have a study partner who will accompany them to each appointment.  This partner may be a family member, close friend, or caregiver.  This person must be someone that knows the participant well and spends a minimum of 10 hours a week with them.  This is necessary in order for the partner to give the research staff feedback on the participant’s memory, health, & functioning throughout the study.

Learn More: MIND Study Website and Frequently Asked Questions

 

Seattle Study Contact: Michael Persenaire mpersena@uw.edu

For More Information

Advancing Research and Treatment for Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (ARTFL)

8101: Advancing Research and Treatment for Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration [ARTFL]: Research Projects 1 & 2

Background: Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD) is the neuropathological term for a related group of rare neurodegenerative disorders that cause a variety of impairments in social function and personality, cognitive ability, language, and motor function. In most cases, this disease begins when a person is in their 40s-60s. The prevalence of the behavioral and cognitive syndromes is approximately 15-22 per 100,000; the most common motor syndrome has a prevalence of 6.4 per 100,000 in the US. All FTLD disorders are regularly fatal and generally lead to death within 10 years of diagnosis, sometimes much faster. There are no effective treatments for any FTLD disorder, and it is hard to accurately diagnose or potentially measure the effectiveness of new therapies.

Research on the different FTLD disorders traditionally has been performed either by behavioral neurologists who focus on behavior, cognition and language, or by movement disorder neurologists who focus on movement abnormalities. There is a growing agreement that research needs to incorporate both to successfully develop effective therapies. The ARTFL consortium brings together leading behavioral and movement disorder researchers in North America to focus on studies that enable research for FTLD. (From ARTFL)

 

The primary objectives of this study are:

To build a reliable FTLD clinical research network to support treatment and clinical trials that focus on the prevention of FTLD.

To determine the clinical characteristics of sporadic FTLD syndromes in patients who would meet typical clinical trial eligibility criteria, and the barriers to clinical trial participation.

To develop a familial FTLD (f-FTLD) cohort for clinical trials and biomarker studies.

 

About this Study: This is an observational study of about 1560 individuals with FTLD syndromes. If you participate in this study, you will have an evaluation of your memory and thinking skills and have a physical examination by a neurologist. You and your study partner will complete some questionnaires. You will be asked to have a sample of blood drawn, and you may be asked to participate in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain or lumbar punctures for cerebrospinal fluid. The study staff may look at your medical records so that we can collect information about your medical history. Participation in the study will take a total of about 8 hours over the course of a day or may be split into two days. If FTLD runs in your family, you may be asked to return in one year for a follow-up visit where many of the assessments you completed during your first study visit will be repeated. (From ARTFL)

 

How to Participate: In order to participate in a study, you must personally contact the study coordinator of any of the participating institutions by phone or by e-mail. Please use the information below to inquire about participation at the UW site in Seattle, WA.

 

Key UW researcher: Kimiko Domoto-Reilly, MD

Study Coordinator: Christina Caso | cdcaso@uw.edu  | 206-221-9038

Trial Websites: ARTFL Research Projects 1&2 -or- ARFTL on ClinicalTrials.gov

For More Information

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The purpose of the Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium is to develop a collection of samples from individuals diagnosed with dementia with lewy bodies (DLB), dementia with lewy bodies/mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or Parkinson's disease dementia who will be followed over time. The consortium will collect detailed clinical information, biospecimens, and imaging data. Led by top leaders in the field, this consortium will fill the gap in resources available for biomarker development in Lewy Body Dementia and promote additional future research by having a readily available subject sample. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you:

-Have a diagnosis of probable dementia with lewy body/MCI or Parkinson's disease dementia

-Have a study partner who is able and willing to comply with required study procedures

-Have at least eight years of education

The study doctor will also check for other medical conditions or reasons that might prevent you from participating in the study

 

Study Leader: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW

Seattle Study Contact: Skye Challener | 206.277.3073

For More Information

All Clinical Trials

Advancing Research and Treatment for Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (ARTFL)

8101: Advancing Research and Treatment for Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration [ARTFL]: Research Projects 1 & 2

Background: Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD) is the neuropathological term for a related group of rare neurodegenerative disorders that cause a variety of impairments in social function and personality, cognitive ability, language, and motor function. In most cases, this disease begins when a person is in their 40s-60s. The prevalence of the behavioral and cognitive syndromes is approximately 15-22 per 100,000; the most common motor syndrome has a prevalence of 6.4 per 100,000 in the US. All FTLD disorders are regularly fatal and generally lead to death within 10 years of diagnosis, sometimes much faster. There are no effective treatments for any FTLD disorder, and it is hard to accurately diagnose or potentially measure the effectiveness of new therapies.

Research on the different FTLD disorders traditionally has been performed either by behavioral neurologists who focus on behavior, cognition and language, or by movement disorder neurologists who focus on movement abnormalities. There is a growing agreement that research needs to incorporate both to successfully develop effective therapies. The ARTFL consortium brings together leading behavioral and movement disorder researchers in North America to focus on studies that enable research for FTLD. (From ARTFL)

 

The primary objectives of this study are:

To build a reliable FTLD clinical research network to support treatment and clinical trials that focus on the prevention of FTLD.

To determine the clinical characteristics of sporadic FTLD syndromes in patients who would meet typical clinical trial eligibility criteria, and the barriers to clinical trial participation.

To develop a familial FTLD (f-FTLD) cohort for clinical trials and biomarker studies.

 

About this Study: This is an observational study of about 1560 individuals with FTLD syndromes. If you participate in this study, you will have an evaluation of your memory and thinking skills and have a physical examination by a neurologist. You and your study partner will complete some questionnaires. You will be asked to have a sample of blood drawn, and you may be asked to participate in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain or lumbar punctures for cerebrospinal fluid. The study staff may look at your medical records so that we can collect information about your medical history. Participation in the study will take a total of about 8 hours over the course of a day or may be split into two days. If FTLD runs in your family, you may be asked to return in one year for a follow-up visit where many of the assessments you completed during your first study visit will be repeated. (From ARTFL)

 

How to Participate: In order to participate in a study, you must personally contact the study coordinator of any of the participating institutions by phone or by e-mail. Please use the information below to inquire about participation at the UW site in Seattle, WA.

 

Key UW researcher: Kimiko Domoto-Reilly, MD

Study Coordinator: Christina Caso | cdcaso@uw.edu  | 206-221-9038

Trial Websites: ARTFL Research Projects 1&2 -or- ARFTL on ClinicalTrials.gov

For More Information

DIAN-TU

*Not Currently Enrolling

The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network Trials Unit (DIAN-TU)

Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network Trial: An Opportunity to Prevent Dementia. A Study of Potential Disease Modifying Treatments in Individuals at Risk for or With a Type of Early Onset Alzheimer Disease Caused by a Genetic Mutation.

DIAN-TU is the first prevention trial for Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer’s Disease (ADAD) families. The DIAN-TU trial focuses on drugs that could potentially change the course of the disease. The goal is to determine the safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of these drugs. The DIAN-TU trial will determine if these medications can prevent, delay, or possibly even reverse Alzheimer’s disease changes in the brain.

Although there are differences between ADAD and the more common age-associated, sporadic Alzheimer’s disease, the results of the studies conducted by this unit will have implications for future studies and treatments in sporadic Alzheimer’s disease. Currently the DIAN-TU-001 treatment trial is the only ongoing, active clinical trial within the DIAN-TU. The Enrollment Criteria for this trial can be found on the trial brochure link below. As new trials become available, information will continue to be posted.

Key UW Researcher: Suman Jayadev, MD
Study Contact: The DIAN Expanded Registry at www.DIANexr.org or 1-844-DIAN-EXR (342-6397)

 
Eligibility

You may be eligible for DIAN-2 if you answer ‘Yes’ to all of the following:

  • Does your family have an ADAD mutation (PSEN1, PSEN2, or APP) for early onset Alzheimer’s disease (less than 60 years) in multiple generations?
  • Are you cognitively normal, or do you have mild dementia? Both are eligible for this prevention trial.
  • Are you between the ages 18 to 80?
  • Are you between 15 years younger to 10 years older than your parent was when they first showed the signs of Alzheimer’s disease?
  • Do you have a family member or friend that can accompany you to visits and provide information about your medical history?
For More Information

Meal and Memory Study

APOE genotype and diet influences on Alzheimer's biomarkers

We are learning more and more about the risks for Alzheimer's disease every year, and that includes learning what foods are best at promoting brain health. It might be more complicated than 'this food is good or bad.' Dr. Angela Hanson, a geriatric physician at the University of Washington, is conducting a study that examines how a risk gene for Alzheimer's disease might affect people's memory and metabolic responses to different meals. Her preliminary work showed that people who carry the gene APOE4 (E4) responded differently to different Alzheimer's treatments and diets, compared to people who did not carry this gene. Dr. Hanson plans to study this further with the “Meal and Memory Study” in adults age 55 and older who do not have dementia. 

 

Eligibility: Participants may be men or women, ages 55 and older. People who have known dementia, or known diabetes, are not eligible.

 

Key researcher:  Angela Hanson, MD

Study Contact: Angela Hanson at 206-897-5393 or hansonaj@uw.edu

For More Information

MIND: Memory Improvement Through Nicotine Dosing

MIND: A National Research Treatment Study for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): Memory Improvement Through Nicotine Dosing

The purpose of this study is to determine whether daily transdermal nicotine (patch) will have a positive effect on early memory impairment in participants diagnosed with MCI.  This study, which will take place at multiple sites across the U.S., will consist of 12 visits over a 2-year period. 

 

Eligibility

Healthy, non-smoking adults, ages 55+, who either notice changes in their memory or whose family members notice memory changes may be eligible to participate.  The purpose of this study is to determine whether nicotine (in patch form) improves memory and functioning in adults diagnosed with MCI. Participants  will have extensive memory & cognitive testing as part of the screening process. Those who meet the study qualifications will be placed on either daily nicotine or placebo (inactive ingredient) patches. Some study sites will additionally conduct an MRI (brain scan) in addition to the regular study procedures.

Participants are required to have a study partner who will accompany them to each appointment.  This partner may be a family member, close friend, or caregiver.  This person must be someone that knows the participant well and spends a minimum of 10 hours a week with them.  This is necessary in order for the partner to give the research staff feedback on the participant’s memory, health, & functioning throughout the study.

Learn More: MIND Study Website and Frequently Asked Questions

 

Seattle Study Contact: Michael Persenaire mpersena@uw.edu

For More Information

Neuroimaging and Function Study

The purpose of this UW Department of Rehabilitation Medicine study is to examine the relationship between brain regions, physical performance and cognitive function in older adults with memory problems.  The study involves two visits (one year apart) to the University of Washington Health Sciences Center.  At the first visit a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is taken of the brain.  Walking, balance and memory tests are completed.  At the second visit only walking, balance and memory tests are completed. Taxi transportation is provided if needed.  Participants receive $50 for the first visit and $30 for the second visit.

 

Key Researcher: Ellen McGough, PhD, UW Assistant Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine

Study Coordinator: Monica Smersh

Study Contact Number: 206-598-6139 or 206-616-5550

For More Information

Prazosin and CSF Biomarkers in mTBI (PoND)

Prazosin and CSF Biomarkers in mTBI (PoND)

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) from explosions is the “signature injury” of Veterans who have deployed to the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Although the immediate effects of a single mTBI usually resolve over days or weeks, multiple mTBIs can lead to both persistent symptoms and, years later, to two fatal progressive brain diseases, chronic traumatic encephalopathy and Alzheimer's disease. It is believed that these diseases are caused by nerve damaging chemicals called tau and beta amyloid produced by the brain but which are not removed from the brain in a normal manner in persons with mTBIs. The investigators will determine in Veterans who experienced mTBIs whether a clinically available drug called prazosin increases removal of tau and beta amyloid from the brain. This will be accomplished by seeing if prazosin reduces the amount of tau and beta amyloid in the spinal fluid that surrounds the brain. If the investigators find such reductions, prazosin will be evaluated as a preventative treatment in future studies. (from Clinical Trials.gov)

 

Key researcher: Murray A Raskind, MD, VA Puget Sound Health Care System Seattle Division, Seattle, WA

Study Contacts: Rebecca C Hendrickson, MD | Rebecca.Hendrickson@va.gov | 206-277-5054

                         Hollie A Holmes | hollie.holmes@va.gov | (206) 277-6207

Trial Description on clinicaltrials.gov

For More Information

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium Study

The purpose of the Dementia with Lewy Bodies Consortium is to develop a collection of samples from individuals diagnosed with dementia with lewy bodies (DLB), dementia with lewy bodies/mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or Parkinson's disease dementia who will be followed over time. The consortium will collect detailed clinical information, biospecimens, and imaging data. Led by top leaders in the field, this consortium will fill the gap in resources available for biomarker development in Lewy Body Dementia and promote additional future research by having a readily available subject sample. 

 

You may qualify for this study if you:

-Have a diagnosis of probable dementia with lewy body/MCI or Parkinson's disease dementia

-Have a study partner who is able and willing to comply with required study procedures

-Have at least eight years of education

The study doctor will also check for other medical conditions or reasons that might prevent you from participating in the study

 

Study Leader: Debby Tsuang, MD, Professor, UW Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/ Leader of the Dementia with Lewy Body Consortium Study site at the VA Puget Sound Health Care Center/UW

Seattle Study Contact: Skye Challener | 206.277.3073

For More Information