Bothwell, Mark

Faculty Profile

First Name: 
Mark
Last Name: 
Bothwell
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Title: 
Professor
Primary Institution: 
UW
Department/Division: 
other
Department/Division: 
Physiology & Biophysics
E-Mail: 
Mail/Box #: 

358056

Office Location: 

S423 SLU (850 Republican St.)

Office Phone: 
(206) 543-7924
Alternate Phone: 
(425) 296-9314
Research

Research Summary: 

Our research focuses on receptor signal transduction in the brain, in embryonic development and in neurodegenerative diseases. Presently our attention is directed to two projects.  One project addresses the hypothesis that the capacity of the neurotrophin receptor p75 to signal is gated by reactive oxygen species.  Oxidative stress controls formation of a disulfide bond linking subunits of a dimeric p75 complex that is required for neurotrophin-dependent activation of the receptor. The second project generates motor neurons and cortical neurons from induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from individuals with genetically determined neurodegenerartive diseases. A primary focus of the second project tests the hypothesis that the many genes mutated in Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2 (CMT2) disturb fission/fusion dynamics and transport of mitochondria in axons of motor neuron axons.  We hypothesize that axonal degeneration in CMT2 results from inappropriate reactivation of a signaling program that normally controls motor axon pruning during development.  This signaling program is postulated to employ a mitochondria-dependent BAX/caspase signaling pathway. 

Short Research Description: 
Signal transduction in the nervous system
Areas of Interest: 
Cell Signaling & Cell/Environment Interactions
Developmental Biology, Stem Cells & Aging
Neuroscience
Keywords: 
<p> biology cellular, cardiovascular system, gene expression, growth factors, cardiovascular biology, cell biology, cell-cell interactions, central nervous system, developmental biology, gene, gene expression, gene regulation, growth factor receptors, growth factors, muscle, nervous system, neurobiology, neuroglia, neurons, specific cell types, synapses, Alzheimer&#39;s disease, signal transduction</p>
Publications


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