Meet, Greet, Teach: Making a Difference?

Screen Shot 2014-03-31 at 12.16.30 PMAn informal conversation about interdisciplinary teaching on environmental issues.

Thursday April 3, 2014
5:00 – 6:30pm
Program on the Environment Commons, Wallace Hall (ACC) 012

Register Now

Free to attend. RSVP requested by Monday March 31, 2014

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Only 27% of college students end up in careers reflecting their disciplinary degree. For the environment side of natural science, it’s 48%. The average person changes careers 2-3 times.

Is a laser focus on disciplinary knowledge and associated skills sets a wise academic choice; one that gives students all of the tools they’ll need to be successful?

What about the career, professional, and life skills – the essentials that everyone needs, and no course teaches? Effective communication, team based experience, organizing, leadership, listening, connecting and networking, visioning, creating a clear idea, selling it. The list is long.

Join us for a discussion of how – and why – blending essential skills into coursework can make a difference to student learning.

Panelists:

  • Emer Dooley, Lecturer in Entrepreneurship, Foster School of Business
  • Francesca Lo,  Director, Husky Leadership Initiative
  • Sean McDonald, Lecturer/Capstone Instructor, Program on the Environment; Research Scientist, School of Aquatic &  Fishery Sciences
  • Jennifer Turns, Professor, Human Centered Design & Engineering

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About MGT:
MGT is an evening series offering graduate students, postdocs, staff and faculty with an interest in engaging in artful, interactive, innovative teaching a chance to interact with colleagues from across campus who are willing to share their enthusiasm and experience.

Each MGT focuses on a single “30,000 foot” issue: What is interdisciplinary? The role of facts versus values. Can personalized teaching be objective teaching? Saving STEM.

Over a glass of wine and light appetizers, attendees have a chance to mix and mingle before settling down to a 30-minute “fast panel” of 3-5 faculty, each delivering thought- and conversation – provoking answers. With time for both structured and social interaction, MGT presents an opportunity for everyone to have a say, make a contact, find a shared direction, and learn something new.

Wanting more follow-up? We’ll wrap up the session with time for more one-on-one interaction, giving everyone time to grab a speaker for a final comment.

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Sponsored by the College of the Environment and hosted by t he Program on the Environment

  1. U.S. Census, 2010
  2. McKinsey Report
  3. U.S. Dept of Labor

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