Skip to Content

Clinicians

Faculty

Fellows

Administration

Clinicians

chait-20111

Alan Chait, M.D.

Division Head
Edwin L. Bierman Professor of Medicine

Alan Chait, M.D. has had a long-standing interest in plasma lipid metabolism and in the cell biology of atherosclerosis, with particular emphasis on the role of nutrition, diabetes, and inflammation in atherogenesis. His laboratory uses in vitro approaches and mouse models to dissect out the complex interactions amongst inflammation, obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis.

Read More . . .
Bremner_crop for site

William J. Bremner, M.D., Ph.D.

Department of Medicine Chair
Robert G. Petersdorf Professor of Medicine

Mechanisms for central nervous system control of pituitary gonadotropin secretion and the effects of gonadotropins on gonadal function. Major physiological and clinical questions being addressed include: (1) Can a safe, effective, reversible contraceptive for men be developed? (2) What are the effects of aging on the male reproductive endocrine system? (3) What are the effects of androgens in men and women? (4) What are the relative roles of LH and FSH in controlling testicular function?

Read More . . .
brunzell

John D. Brunzell, M.D.

Professor Emeritus of Medicine

Genetic abnormalities in lipoprotein metabolism. Specific interest in: (1) the pathophysiological and molecular defects in familial combined hyperlipidemia; (2) the role of hepatic lipase gene and activity in determination of dyslipidemia seen in the metabolic syndrome with intraabdominal obesity and insulin resistance in diabetes and at menopause.

Read More . . .
Cummings_D_03[1]

David E. Cummings, M.D.

Professor of Medicine

Neuroendocrine mechanisms regulating appetite, body weight, and glucose homeostasis. Specific areas of study include the following: 1) Characterizing roles of the orexigenic hormone ghrelin in energy balance and glucose homeostasis; 2) Clarifying hormonal mechanisms that contribute to weight loss and diabetes resolution after bariatric surgery; and 3) Understanding the interplay between homeostatic and hedonic pathways in the regulation of food intake.

Read More . . .
Anthony DeSantis Diabetes_3265 (3)

Anthony DeSantis, M.D.

Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine

Dr. DeSantis specializes in Endocrinology focusing on type 1 and type 2 diabetes, adrenal problems, metabolic bone disease, pituitary problems and thyroid problems.

Read More . . .
Espina, Cora

Cora Espina, MN, ARNP, CWCN

MN, ARNP, CWCN

Together with physician colleagues, manage patients on the Hyperglycemia Consult Service, who are hospitalized at the University of Washington Medical Center. Following their initially discharge from the hospital, oversee and support patients transition to outpatient clinic. This clinic is aimed at supporting the continuum of care following discharge.

Read More . . .
Richard Failor_7 (2)

Alan Failor, M.D.

Clinical Professor of Medicine

Dr. Failor specializes in Endocrinology focusing on Diabetes, Diabetes care and Pituitary Disorders.

Read More . . .
foster

Karen E. Foster-Schubert, M.D.

Associate Professor of Medicine

Dr. Foster-Schubert’s research focus is on human obesity and body weight regulation. She has investigated the role of exercise-induced weight loss and macronutrient effects on the orexigenic hormone ghrelin, as well as ghrelin’s effects on islet insulin release. Current research projects are aimed at the following: 1) hormonal and physiologic predictors (including alterations in adipose gene expression) of successful weight loss maintenance following diet and exercise interventions; 2) the effect of varying dietary energy density on body weight regulatory hormones and appetite; 3) development of a novel imaging method to measure parameters of hypothalamic regulation of body weight in humans, using a multi-disciplinary approach.

Read More . . .
Hao_Shirt1 4

Wei Hao, M.D., Ph.D.

Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine
Director, Inpatient Hyperglycemia Consult Service at UWMC

Development and oversight of a hospital-wide inpatient hyperglycemia consult service at UWMC, leading a team of ARNP, fellows and residents, and ensuing safe transitions between the inpatient and outpatient setting for patients with diabetes and hyperglycemia; development of systems to improve glycemic management within UWMC with a goal to meet hospital quality measures.
In Endocrine care, I have special interest in management of multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes and parathyroid disorders. I have a long-standing research interest in the pathogenesis, prevention and intervention of type 1 diabetes.

Read More . . .
Henley_Elaine_Endo_

Elaine D. Henley, M.D.

Clinical Professor of Medicine

Past research primarily involved the study of carbohydrate metabolism with emphasis on diabetes, insulin and hypoglycemic agents. Current activities are clinically-oriented with wide general endocrine interests in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with all endocrine diseases. Special interests are young adults with thyroid, gonadal, adrenal and pituitary problems.

Read More . . .
hirsch

Irl B. Hirsch, M.D.

Professor of Medicine

Using new technologies for the management of diabetes, particularly using improved glucose sensors and insulins for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. I have a long-standing interest in both better management strategies and how these strategies improve outcomes in hyperglycemic inpatients. For this interest we are now studying bone marrow transplant patients. Finally, I have a long-standing interest in how glucose variability may impact the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications. We are currently funded to study this in our first randomized trial, "FLAT-SUGAR".

Read More . . .
Kahn

Steven E. Kahn, M.B., Ch.B.

Professor of Medicine

Assessment of islet function and insulin action in states of normal and abnormal carbohydrate metabolism. Determination of defects in islet function and their relationship to genetic markers in subjects at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Evaluations of the mechanisms regulating the synthesis and secretion of islet amyloid polypeptide by the pancreatic ß-cell in vitro and in vivo, and its deposition as islet amyloid. Role of fat distribution on metabolic variables associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Read More . . .
ott-new

Susan Ott, M.D.

Professor of Medicine

Clinical and bone histomorphometric studies of bone metabolism. Effects of contraception and lifestyle on bone density in adolescents; mineralization density of bone; bone histomorphometry of women with breast cancer; renal osteodystrophy.

Read More . . .
Page Stephanie

Stephanie Page, M.D., Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Medicine
Section Chief, Endocrinology and Diabetes, Harborview Medical Center

Physiologic and therapeutic properties of androgens and androgen manipulation in humans. Major projects include: 1) examination of the consequences of testosterone replacement on prostate health in middle-aged and elderly, hypogonaldal men at both the clinical, hormonal, and molecular levels; 2) examining the effect of androgens on host immunity and inflammation; and 3) determining the effect of testosterone on cardiovascular risk and risk factors. Continued involvement in projects investigating the pharmokinetics of novel oral formulations of testosterone delivery and the development of an effective, reversible male hormonal contraceptive.

Read More . . .
palmer-e13269294094791.alignleft

Jerry P. Palmer, M.D.

Professor of Medicine
Section Head, VA Puget Sound Health Care System
Director, Diabetes Endocrinology Research Center

My research focuses on the immunology of the type 1 diabetes disease process in humans. The dual role of T cells in mediating the beta cell destruction of this disease, but also in mediating protection against beta cell destruction is being investigated. We are participating in TrialNet which is testing the ability of immunomodulatory therapies to preserve beta cell function in recently diagnosed type 1 diabetes patients and the ability to prevent or delay clinical type 1 diabetes in high risk individuals. Approximately 20-30 percent of typical type 2 diabetes patients have anti-islet antibodies similar to type 1 diabetes. We are investigating the genetic, immunologic, and metabolic components of the diabetes disease process in these antibody positive type 2 patients to determine whether this is type 1 diabetes at an older age or a different disease process.

Read More . . .
Mara Roth, MD

Mara Y. Roth, M.D.

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Mechanisms for control of intratesticular steroidogenesis and the effects of gonadotropins and exogenous hormones on gonadal function. Major physiological and clinical questions being addressed include: 1) Why do hormonal contraceptives work for some men, but not others? 2) What are the minimal intratesticular hormones required for spermatogenesis? 3) Can intratesticular steroid concentrations predict male infertility and be used to develop specific therapies?

Read More . . .
Rubinow, Katya 2

Katya Rubinow, M.D.

Assistant Professor of Medicine

My research focus is the role of sex steroid signaling in macrophage biology, specifically in the setting of cardiometabolic disease. Aging in men is characterized by progressive decline in testosterone production, and very low levels of circulating androgens consistently have been associated with increased risk of insulin resistance (IR), type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Further, IR and T2DM tend to arise prior to CVD in these men and may contribute substantially to cardiovascular risk. Consequently, determining the physiologic effects of testosterone on systemic insulin sensitivity could have clinical relevance to all men as they age and offer novel therapeutic strategies for preventing or delaying diabetes and CVD.

Read More . . .
Michael Schwartz

Michael W. Schwartz, M.D.

Professor of Medicine
Director, Diabetes and Obesity Center of Excellence

Physiological mechanisms underlying body weight regulation and the pathogenesis of obesity and diabetes. Major questions under investigation are: (1) By what mechanism do circulating signals involved in the regulation of body adiposity, including insulin and leptin, act in the brain? (2) Which specific hypothalamic pathways are sensitive to the actions of insulin and leptin, and what is the cellular basis for these actions? (3) What are the behavioral and metabolic consequences of the actions of insulin and leptin on their hypothalamic targets? (4) What mechanism is responsible for hypothalamic resistance to these hormones in obese individuals? (5) Do neurocircuits involved in food intake also regulate insulin action in peripheral tissues?

Read More . . .
Savitha photo 1[1]

Savitha Subramanian, M.D.

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Our research focuses on studying the role of inflammation in adipose tissue in obesity using mouse models, such as the LDL receptor deficient mouse, a model of the metabolic syndrome. Using this model we study the impact of components of the metabolic syndrome such as visceral obesity, insulin resistance and inflammation on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. We are currently also using this mouse model to study the effects of fat accumulation in the liver (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis) and the role of hepatic inflammation in insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. A second area of interest is the role of the nutrient sensor molecule mTOR in adipose tissue in obesity. mTOR is important in longevity, a condition associated with improved insulin sensitivity. I am currently involved in studying the role of inhibiting mTOR using mouse models and dietary interventions to study the role of this complex molecule in obesity and insulin resistance.

Read More . . .
Joshua Thaler And Chongren Tang, Diabetes & Obesity Center Faculty

Joshua Thaler, M.D., Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Medicine

My focus is the hypothalamic regulation of energy homeostasis and the alterations to this system during obesity pathogenesis. My primary project investigates hypothalamic inflammation and its relationship to high fat diet-induced weight gain with an emphasis on the role of glial cells (astrocytes and microglia) in modulating the neuronal regulation of energy homeostasis. In particular, we are determining whether glial cells provide a repair response to diet-induced damage to critical hypothalamic neurons and whether interventions targeted at glia may therefore influence the course of obesity. A second study examines the role of inflammatory signaling in hypothalamic neurons and microglia in obesity-associated insulin resistance and diabetes.

Read More . . .
Dace

Dace Trence, M.D.

Professor of Medicine
Director, Metabolism, Endocrinology and Nutrition Fellowship Program

Improving health care delivery to patients with diabetes through improved skills of medical residents, nurse practioners, use of electronic and encounter medical record. Osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus.

Read More . . .
Trikudanathan Subbulaxmi (4)

Subbulaxmi Trikudanathan, MD, MRCP, MMSc

Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine

Dr. Subbu Trikudanathan specializes in Endocrinology with particular focus on diabetes, polycystic ovarian syndrome, adrenal disorders, thyroid disorders and metabolic bone disease.

Read More . . .
Tylee_Tracy_small

Tracy Tylee, M.D.

Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine

Dr. Tylee specializes in endocrinology, with a particular interest in the management of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, adrenal disorders, disorders of calcium metabolism and thyroid disease, including thyroid biopsies.

Read More . . .
kristina

Kristina Utzschneider, M.D.

Associate Professor of Medicine

Dr. Utzschneider's research focuses on the interaction between liver disease and glucose metabolism. One study investigates the effect of iron overload due to hereditary hemochromatosis on insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function. A second study attempts to better understand the mechanisms linking non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and insulin resistance. In addition, she continues to study the relationship between measures of insulin response and insulin sensitivity using measures derived from an oral glucose tolerance test.

Read More . . .
weigle

D. Scott Weigle, M.D.

Professor of Medicine

Studies of mechanisms of experimental and human obesity. Identification of factors produced by adipose tissue that influence appetite and fuel metabolism. Effect of dietary macronutrient composition and aging on body fat mass. Alteration in body fat distribution by protease inhibitor therapy in HIV infection. Undergraduate physiology education.

Read More . . .
Wisse_B_40[1]

Brent Wisse, M.D.

Associate Professor of Medicine

The focus of the laboratory is on investigating the central (CNS) mechanisms that lead to diminished appetite (anorexia) in chronic disease states. Anorexia and weight loss are major complications of many chronic diseases including cancer, AIDS, adrenal insufficiency and inflammatory disorders, that lead to an excess morbidity and mortality. The hypothalamic neuropeptides that control appetite are being examined in a variety of rodent models of pathologic anorexia, with particular emphasis on treatments that block melanocortin and cytokine signaling. The long-term goals are to identify targets that may lead to improved treatment of anorexia and of obesity.

Read More . . .
Wright, Lorena

Lorena Alarcon-Casas Wright, M.D.

Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine

Dr. Wright’s focus is directed towards glycemic control and glycemic markers in diabetes and pregnancy complicated by diabetes. Prevention of complications related to diabetes and preventing/delaying pre-diabetes and diabetes progression.

Read More . . .