Supporters

Walter Chapin Simpson Center for the Humanities at the University of Washington
National Endowment for the Humanities
Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization

Our People

Newbook Digital Texts in the Humanities was founded in 2012, by Walter Andrews, at the University of Washington. It has come to include a group of scholars who envision easy, open access to less well known literary and historical texts, and like works in the humanities and social sciences that might not otherwise be published by conventional academic presses.

Directors & Board

Walter G. Andrews, is founder of the Ottoman Text Archive Project, and co-founder of Newbook Digital Texts in the Humanities. Walter is a Research Professor of Near Eastern Languages and Literature; he has translated and published several works on Ottoman and modern Turkish poetry and culture. walter@uw.edu

Mary E. Childs, PhD, is a co-founder of Newbook Digital Texts in the Humanities. Mary is a specialist in late- and post-Soviet Literature, both Russian and Georgian, and gender studies. She is a translator of Georgian literature, and a lecturer at the University of Washington, both in the Slavic Department and in Comparative History of Ideas; and an adjunct Professor of Russian Culture at Seattle Pacific University. mchilds@uw.edu

Sarah Ketchley, PhD, is a co-founder of Newbook Digital Texts in the Humanities. Sarah is an Egyptologist, specializing in art history in the first millennium. She has taught courses Egyptian history and archeology at the University of Birmingham, UK, and at the University of Washington. She is currently working on Emma B. Andrews Diaries, inspired by a passion for intrepid women travelers in the 19th century. ketchley@uw.edu

Technical Staff

Stacy Waters, PhD, has provided technical assistance to Walter Andrews on the Ottoman Text Archive Project and Svoboda Diary projects. He has taught courses in Digital Arts for the Humanities, and assisted with several projects at CARTAH (Center for Advanced Research Technology in the Arts and Humanities), at the University of Washington. He is a specialist in medieval English texts. stacy@uw.edu

Rachel Brown, is an MA Candidate in the NELC department at the University of Washington. She works as the project manager for the Svoboda Diaries project, and overseas its day-to-day running. Rachel's research areas include Iraq, Iran, Syria and Turkey and her language focuses are in Turkish, Persian and French. rachel.elle.brown@gmail.com

Ryan Bielby, is an MS Candidate in Computational Linguistics at the University of Washington, with an interest in Georgian language, machine translation, and hiking. rbielby@u.washington.edu

Joshua Crowgey, is a PhD student in Computational Linguistics at the University of Washington. He has been assisting the Svoboda Diary Project, Ottoman Text Archive Project, and the Alexander Diaries for four years. His special interests include formal syntax, Salish languages (e.g. Lushootseed), linguistic typology, and gardening. jcrowgey@uw.edu.

Student Interns

Each year we have been fortunate to have a group of student interns working for Newbook Digital Texts in the Humanities, helping with tasks from transcribing and editing, to technical aspects of the projects.

2012-2013:

Emma B. Andrews: Megan Rowland, Tessa Carter, Janice Garr, Ariella Fish, Rachel Schlotfeldt.

Georgian Digital Text Collective: Ryan Bielby

Svoboda Diaries:

Undergraduates: Scott Anderson, Jess Beatty, Tessa Carter, Aaron Chau, Ariella Fish, Janice Garr, Kelsie Haakenson, Kelsey Hallahan, Jennifer Jarrett, Megan Roland, Rachel Schlotfeldt, Allison Skinner, Mileta Sorokovskaya, Dana Talant, Victoria Wellington, Sophie Welti, Tianyu Yang.

Graduate students: PhD: Joshua Crowgey. MA: Rachel E. Brown, Kearby Chess, Barbara Henning, Shima Houshyar. MS: Ryan Bielby.

Summer interns: Sophie Saouma (2012), Camille Cole (2012), Christopher Chan (2013).