New Geographies of Feminist Art: China, Asia, and the World

Nalini Malani

Nalini Malani, Cassandra, 2009, 30 panel polytych, acrylic, ink, and enamel reverse painging on acrylic sheet, 227.5 x 396cm, from the artist’s website.

Nalini Malani’s work is influenced by her experiences as a refugee of the Partition of India. She places inherited iconographies and cherished cultural stereotypes under pressure. Her point of view is unwaveringly urban and internationalist, and unsparing in its condemnation of a cynical nationalism that exploits the beliefs of the masses. Hers is an art of excess, going beyond the boundaries of legitimized narrative, exceeding the conventional and initiating dialogue. Characteristics of her work have been the gradual movement towards new media, international collaboration and expanding dimensions of the pictorial surface into the surrounding space as ephemeral wall drawing, installation, shadow play, multi projection works and theatre. Some of her solo exhibitions are Cassandra, Galerie Lelong, Paris (2009), Listening to the Shades, Arario Gallery, New York (2008), and Nalini Malani, Walsh Gallery, Chicago (2007). Malani has also participated in numerous group exhibitions. Some of which are MATER, Universidad de Jaén, Spain (2009), National Galleries of Modern Art, New Delhi/Bangalore/Bombay (2009), and The National Museum of Modern Art Tokyo, Kyoto, Seoul (2009). 

Malani’s work is being discussed in Susan Bean’s presentation Nalini Malani: At Home in the World.

Bibliography:

Fibicher, B., S. Gopinath, and Kunstmuseum Bern. 2007. Horn Please: Narratives in Contemporary Indian Art. Ostfildern, Germany: Hatje Cantz.

Knox, G., P. Nagy, J. Pijnappel, Icon, India Contemporary, and Venice Biennale 2005. Icon, India Contemporary: Atul Dodiya, Anita Dube, Ranbir Kaleka, Nalini Malani, Raqs Media Collective, Nataraj Sharma. Saratoga, CA: Sally and Don Lucas Artists Programs.

Malani, N., W. Chadwick, B. Fibicher, J. Pijnappel, and Musée Cantonal des Beaux-Arts Lausanne. 2010. Nalini Malani: Splitting the Other: Retrospective 1992-2009. Ostfildern, Germany: Hatje Cantz.

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