Pregnancy-Related Care Research Network (PRCRN)

The Pregnancy-Related Care Research Network (PRCRN) is funded by the Health Resources & Services Administration (HRSA), Maternal and Child Health Bureau to improve healthcare for women and children in the United States through health service, biologic, and social science research. The PRCRN national coordinating center is based at the University of Washington, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology in Seattle, Washington and coordinates research at 16 medical centers across the United States.

ABOUT THE PRCRN

The PRCRN main objectives are to:

  • Encourage interaction among different health care professionals, researchers, and policy analysts to study critical issues in order to improve maternal and child health.
  • Analyze the opinions, knowledge, clinical practice, and educational needs of physicians relevant to maternal and child health.
  • Evaluate the efficacy and outcomes of clinical practice guidelines affecting maternal and child health.
  • Train and mentor students and young researchers/physicians and provide logistical support to encourage young investigators to engage in research.

WHY IS THE PRCRN UNIQUE?

PRCRN is the only existing national panel of practicing obstetrician-gynecologists recruited to participate in research studies. Although national in scope, the coordinating center at the University of Washington (UW) is uniquely positioned to address rural health issues as UW’s WWAMI (Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho) program acts as the single medical school for a quarter of the landmass of the United States. The PRCRN provides physicians the opportunity to get involved in research and interact with colleagues in their field of interest. In recent years, PRCRN has expanded by extracting data from medical records and patient surveys in addition to provider surveys. These data are useful in comparing subjective responses to objective data to identify gaps in practice and knowledge. The PRCRN interacts with and mentors young MDs, influences guidelines and Continuing Medical Education (CME) programs, and advances healthcare for women.

 

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under UA6MC31609 Pregnancy-Related Care Research Network. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.