Niche conservatism: which niche matters most?

Niche conservatism - or the degree to which plants and animals retain their niches and related ecological traits through space and time – is a classic concept in ecology receiving renewed interest in recent years. This is partly because of its relevance to predicting species’ responses to global change, since a tendency toward conservatism would mean that species have only a limited capacity to...
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Saving the Australian Lungfish – through its stomach

The Australian lungfish, (Neoceratodus forsteri), is one of only five extant lungfish species in the world. It is a member of the oldest living vertebrate genera on the planet, with fossil records dating back 380 million years. At one time distributions extended to the center of the Australian continent, but at present only the Australian lungfish remains in a small number of rivers of southeast...
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Chehalis River: endemic fish and non-native plants

Non-native aquatic plants can have far reaching and unforeseen impacts on habitat for fish, invertebrates, and other wildlife; however, logistical constraints often don’t allow for investigation of impact across multiple trophic or community levels. The lack of comprehensive information regarding impact of non-native plants on aquatic ecosystems can hinder managers’ ability to prioritize...
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Ecological integrity in freshwaters

The term “ecological integrity” became a linchpin of freshwater management and conservation in 1972, when it was mandated as an objective in the U.S. Clean Water Act (Section 101, “to restore and maintain the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Nation’s waters.”) Since that time, large amounts of research has been devoted to methods of assessing the status and condition of...
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Amazon freshwater fish in a changing climate

In general when we think about climate change, most people think about cold water species, but warm water species could be also be affected. The Amazon River Basin is an enormous area expected to be affected by climate change; approximately 7 million km2 of dense river network with the largest number of freshwater fish species anywhere in the world. The Amazon is home to more than 2,000...
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