Rusty crayfish: front lines are moving fast

What freshwater bug is 3-inch long and crawls downriver nearly 10 miles a year and eat everything on its path? Answer: invasive crayfish. Two years ago, Laura Twardochleb from the Olden Lab published a comprehensive meta-analysis of the literature to summarize the extent of damage that non-native crayfish cause to freshwater ecosystems. She found that because of their omnivory and role as...
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Dams, scarcity, and social-ecological resilience

We know that dams are a paramount driver of hydrological alteration, homogenizing regional river dynamics and biodiversity. However, dams also provide a range of socio-economic benefits, and under scenarios of water scarcity due to climate change and over-allocation of freshwater resources, it is increasingly important to ask how dams may provide engineered resilience to dependent social and...
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What makes a species rare?

In a community, it is almost always true that some species are common while most are rare. This pattern is demonstrated by plotting species abundance distributions (see Magurran 2003 or Verbeek 2014 for excellent overviews) observed in many real life communities. Local abundance is not the only facet of rarity – species can also be defined as rare or common in terms of their overall...
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Share your story: World Fish Migration Day 2016

Call for videos – deadline extended to May 7th! Migration plays a central role in the life cycle of many fish species. For feeding, reproducing, or simply completing their life cycle, fish sometimes need to move long distances, within freshwater environments or between marine and freshwater systems. Well-known fish such as eels, salmons, and sturgeons in waters of North America and Europe...
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Niche conservatism: which niche matters most?

Niche conservatism - or the degree to which plants and animals retain their niches and related ecological traits through space and time – is a classic concept in ecology receiving renewed interest in recent years. This is partly because of its relevance to predicting species’ responses to global change, since a tendency toward conservatism would mean that species have only a limited capacity to...
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