Julian Olden – Professor

I’m an ecologist with a huge heart for freshwater environments and the biological life that they support. Active in science communication, consuming craft beer and flat whites, and gently squeezing fish in the field.

Phone: (206) 616-3112

Email: olden@uw.edu

Office: Fisheries Bld, Room 318A

OUR TEAM

Lauren

Research Scientist

Research
My research touches on many aspects of freshwater ecology, but tends to focus on detection and management of invasive species (especially aquatic invasive plants) as well issues of local importance in Washington State. One of my favorite things about my position is that I am able to build partnerships with agencies and stakeholders to help inform on-the-ground conservation and management actions.
Contact

Lauren Kuehne

Phone: (206) 685-9582

Email: lkuehne@uw.edu

Office: Fisheries Bld, Room 308D

Visit Lauren’s Website

Thiago

PhD Student

Research
I’m a PhD student interested in conservation and ecology of rivers and their inhabitants (OK, fishes are way more fascinating, but I also like other things that fish eat). My research focus on habitat fragmentation, limnology and population/community ecology. For my dissertation, I’m studying the current expansion of small hydropower dams and their effects on river ecosystems and communities across the landscape. Fieldwork is being conducted in the Chapecó River (Uruguay Basin) in the Southern Brazil.
Contact

Thiago B. A. Couto

Phone: (206) 685-9582

Email: coutot@uw.edu

Office: Fisheries Bld, Room 317A

Visit Thiago’s Website

Elliot

MS Student

Research

I’m broadly interested in using quantitative methods in freshwater ecology, environmental conservation, and resource management. My current research focuses on the effect of wildfire disturbance on stream thermal regimes in the Pacific Northwest. In collaboration with Ashley Steel (USFS), I’m utilizing long-term temperature monitoring data, multivariate analyses and spatially-explicit watershed data to analyze the potential impacts of wildfire on thermal conditions and the implications for freshwater species in various thermal guilds.

Contact

Elliot Koontz

Email: ekoontz@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 685-9582

Office: Fisheries Bld, Room 315A

Visit Elliot’s Website

Erika

PhD Student
Research
After my career as a pilot in the Navy, I became interested in invasion biology and the mechanisms that control secondary spread. My dissertation research centers around the smallmouth bass invasion in the Columbia River Basin. Through extensive field research, I examine the factors that limit or promote upstream spread in headwater streams and convert these data into species distribution models and population dynamics models to inform management.
Contact

Erika Rubenson

Phone: (206) 685-9582

Email: esuther@uw.edu

Office: Fisheries Bld, Room 317B

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Beka

MS Student

Research

My research examines carbon transfer from aquatic plants and algae through the aquatic food webs of Washington’s naturally fishless alpine lakes. Currently I’m exploring how edge (littoral) habitat and the density of stocked trout influence carbon transfers within the food web, with the goal of providing management and conservation insights to support productive ecosystem function in the future. I am co-advised by Gordon Holtgrieve.

Contact

Rebekah Stiling

Email:stilir@uw.edu

Rachel

Undergraduate

Research

I’m interested in the impacts of human manipulation of freshwater ecosystems via invasive species transmission and altered flow regimes, and conservation approaches to these effects. My current research examines spatial patterns in angler movement with the intention of identifying frequently-traveled pathways between lakes and reservoirs, a common vector for invasive species.

Contact

Rachel Fricke

Email:rmfricke@uw.edu

Jane

PhD Student

Research
I am interested in population, community and ecosystem level (food-web) impacts of hydrologic variability and invasive species on endemic fishes of dryland rivers. My research focuses on (1) how intermittent surface water flows affect population persistence, metacommunity dynamics, and community assembly and (2) how invasive species affect food-web structure, energy pathways, and the trophic niche of native species. With this research, my aim is to provide insights into landscape level management and conservation of native fishes in freshwater ecosystems of the southwestern U.S.
Contact

Jane Rogosch

Phone: (206) 685-9582

Email: jfencl@uw.edu

Office: Fisheries Bld, Room 317C

Mathis

MS Student

Research
My research currently focuses on biological invasions in river systems. Specifically, my Master’s thesis aims to understand and predict the leading edge dynamics of a population of invasive crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) in the John Day River, a major tributary of the Columbia River in Oregon. In addition, I am trying to understand how native species traits are related to the ability of exotic species to invade freshwater fish communities.
Contact

Mathis Messager

Phone: (206) 685-9582

Email: messamat@uw.edu

Office: Fisheries Bld, Room 317C

Ethen

Undergraduate

Research

I’m broadly interested in how humans interact with and alter freshwater environments along with how invasive species interact within novel communites.

Contact

Ethen Whattam

Email: ethen.whattam@gmail.com