Species distributions

Posted by on Mar 19, 2013 in Conservation Biogeography | Comments Off

Species distributions

Ecologists are challenged to reconcile the historical biogeography of long-evolved native species with the emerging and rapidly expanding patterns of recently arrived non-indigenous species. In contrast to terrestrial species, freshwater fishes are uniquely constrained because their ability to respond to environmental change is limited to movement defined by the connectivity of water. Our research investigates changes in distribution of native species due to climate and other human-related drivers, as well as forecasting future distribution and spread of novel invaders. (more…)

Biotic homogenization

Posted by on Mar 2, 2013 in Conservation Biogeography | Comments Off

Biotic homogenization

Humans have dramatically enhanced the ability of species to overcome natural biogeographic barriers to movement either through intentional transport and other colonization routes created by anthropogenic activities. By dissolving physical barriers to movement and connecting formerly-isolated regions of the world, human-mediated introductions have dramatically reshuffled the present-day biogeography of species. Our research in biotic homogenization focuses the processes by which species invasions and extinctions increase the genetic, taxonomic or functional similarity of two or more regions.  We investigate these processes at a variety of spatial scales for an array of taxonomic groups, and explore the associated ecological, evolutionary and social implications. (more…)