OMA&D Academic Counseling Services

The 14th annual White Privilege Conference is coming to Seattle

 

Please join past White Privilege Conference presenters and attendees Thursday evening, January 24, 6-7:30 PM in the Social Work Commons, Room 305, to:

• Learn what the White Privilege Conference has to offer you

•Hear how previous attendees have acted upon what they learned at the WPC, including the formation of an SSW Anti-racism and white allyship group

The White Privilege Conference is a conference that examines challenging concepts of privilege and oppression and offers solutions and team building strategies to work toward a more equitable world.

The WPC is coming to the Seattle area April 10-13, 2013 for its 14th annual conference.  The conference brings together more than 1,500 diverse attendees from more than 35 states, Australia, Bermuda, Canada, and Germany.  The conference is unique in its ability to bring together high school and college students, teachers, university faculty and higher education professionals, nonprofit staff, activists, social workers and counselors, healthcare workers, and members of the spiritual community and corporate arena.

What is the White Privilege Conference? Adapted from their website at http://www.whiteprivilegeconference.com/wpc.html:

1. WPC is a conference that examines challenging concepts of privilege and oppression and offers solutions and team building strategies to work toward a more equitable world.

2. It is not a conference designed to attack, degrade or beat up on white folks.

3. It is not a conference designed to rally white supremacist groups.

4. WPC is a conference designed to examine issues of privilege beyond skin color. WPC is open to everyone and invites diverse perspectives to provide a comprehensive look at issues of privilege including: race, gender, sexuality, class, disability, etc. — the ways we all experience some form of privilege, and how we’re all affected by that privilege.

5. WPC is committed to a philosophy of “understanding, respecting and connecting.”

Here’s what a recent UW MSW graduate, Stephanie Jones, wrote about her experience at the WPC:

I graduated from the MSW program in 2008. For me, the White Privilege Conference has been a transformative way to connect on a deeper level on race and social justice issues (from areas like environmental justice, education, health, white privilege, race dynamics, and so much more).

I don’t think there is another conference on this scale. Dr. Moore and his team select the best of the best in terms of keynote presenters who are leaders in the work of social justice. As a graduate student, I’ve been able to sit next to Tim Wise and some of my peers and have a thought provoking discussion with him on how whites can be accountable with POC communities in their anti-racism work. Many of the break-out sessions were compelling and gave me tangible tools that I’ve taken with me both in school and in my work. The ability to connect with like-minded people and have engaging and thought-provoking discussions have helped me to form new friendships with colleagues “doing the work”.

 

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