Office of Planning and Budgeting

Results of Higher Ed Ballot Initiatives Across the Country

On Tuesday, 11 states voted on ballot measures that could impact higher education. The following table (based on one from The Chronicle) summarizes how those measures fared.

YES–the measure passed           NOthe measure failed

YES Prop 30 Would temporarily increase sales and income taxes in order to raise approx. $6-billion in revenue and stave off $963-million worth of cuts to the public colleges.
NO Question 2 Would allow a $11.3-million bond issue to fund capital for a diagnostic facility at the University of Maine.
YES Question 4 Would let children of illegal immigrants pay in-state tuition rates provided they meet certain conditions.
NO Proposal 2 Would let graduate students form unions and bargain collectively.
NO Prop B Would raise cigarette taxes and use the revenue to create a Health and Education Trust Fund. About 30 percent of revenue would go to higher education.
YES LR-121 Would require proof of citizenship in order for a person to receive certain state services, which includes attending Montana’s public colleges.
YES Question 1 Would let the state issue a $750-million bond for buildings and upgrades at public and private colleges.
YES Question C Would authorize a $120-million sale for certain higher education repairs and improvements.
YES Question 759 Would ban affirmative action programs in the state, including their use in public colleges’ admission policies.
YES Question 759 Would give Rhode Island College up to $50-million for its health and nursing programs’ facilities.
NO SJR 8223 Would allow the UW and WSU to invest publicly-generated revenue (i.e. parking fees and indirect-cost reimbursement for grants) in corporate stock.
YES Initiative 1185 Would renew the requirement of a two-thirds legislative vote in order to create new taxes or raise existing ones–effectively making it more difficult for the state to generate new revenue for programs including higher education.



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