We would like to share something we made:

Patrick Hannan, Jared Knutzen, Nicholas C Lewis, Joy Markham

AdderFab

ME495 (Capstone Design) – University of Washington

March 9, 2011

Stay tuned for more details…

76 Comments on A New species is Born — AdderFab

  1. […] awesome crew over at Open3DP at the UW have birthed a new species of open 3D printer: Adderfab! by Bre Pettis | Categories: Human Friends! | Enjoyed this article? Subscribe to the full […]

  2. […] awesome crew over at Open3DP at the UW have birthed a new species of open 3D printer: Adderfab! by Bre Pettis | Categories: Human Friends! | Enjoyed this article? Subscribe to the full […]

  3. Dimitrios says:

    CLAP,CLAP,CLAP,CLAP…..

    Coming from Lexington, Massachusetts, I would say that ranks up there with “The Shot Heard Round the World”

  4. Dimitrios says:

    CLAP,CLAP,CLAP,CLAP…..

    Coming from Lexington, Massachusetts, I would say that ranks up there with “The Shot Heard Round the World”

  5. Nice!!!!! Great work, can’t wait to see more of this!

  6. Nice!!!!! Great work, can’t wait to see more of this!

  7. johnrpm says:

    Well done, can’t wait to see some details, thanks for sharing the powder recipe’s

    • ganter says:

      John, we’ll release more details. We will work on this project over spring quarter to productize it and work out some of the details (like getting the speed up).

  8. johnrpm says:

    Well done, can’t wait to see some details, thanks for sharing the powder recipe’s

    • ganter says:

      John, we’ll release more details. We will work on this project over spring quarter to productize it and work out some of the details (like getting the speed up).

  9. Oleksiy says:

    What kind of cartridge did you use?

  10. Oleksiy says:

    What kind of cartridge did you use?

  11. Kevin Smith says:

    Fantastic work. The world really needs an open source powder bed printer so we can all try those powder recipes you have been sharing. The design looks very simple and elegant. Kudos to the design team

    • ganter says:

      Kevin, thanks for the kind words. More cool things coming (we have something past 10 new posts coming)! So stay tuned.

  12. Kevin Smith says:

    Fantastic work. The world really needs an open source powder bed printer so we can all try those powder recipes you have been sharing. The design looks very simple and elegant. Kudos to the design team

    • ganter says:

      Kevin, thanks for the kind words. More cool things coming (we have something past 10 new posts coming)! So stay tuned.

  13. owen white says:

    You guys are _open_. Can’t at least minor bits of information get posted now? Could we get a description of the power that is used in the bed, and the material that is deposited by the print head?

    • barnett says:

      Owen–details to come, we thought the video should have the first 1000 words…

    • ganter says:

      Owen, tasty isn’t it. The printing material is one of the four new powders that we are releasing over the next couple of weeks! Sorry it’s not the next powder to be posted but
      soon.

  14. owen white says:

    You guys are _open_. Can’t at least minor bits of information get posted now? Could we get a description of the power that is used in the bed, and the material that is deposited by the print head?

    • barnett says:

      Owen–details to come, we thought the video should have the first 1000 words…

    • ganter says:

      Owen, tasty isn’t it. The printing material is one of the four new powders that we are releasing over the next couple of weeks! Sorry it’s not the next powder to be posted but
      soon.

  15. Congratulations! Looking fordward to see more of its capabilities! Regards 🙂

  16. Congratulations! Looking fordward to see more of its capabilities! Regards 🙂

  17. ioan says:

    Congratulations! Amazing work. It seems a lot of interesting things are rising up this year and also keep others motivated.

  18. ioan says:

    Congratulations! Amazing work. It seems a lot of interesting things are rising up this year and also keep others motivated.

  19. rukey3001 says:

    Wow.. Congratulations..!! Can’t wait to see info

  20. rukey3001 says:

    Wow.. Congratulations..!! Can’t wait to see info

  21. […] Druck. Erst vor wenigen Tagen stellte die Plattform eine neue Spezie von 3D Drucker vor, der AdderFab (Video […]

  22. […] Druck. Erst vor wenigen Tagen stellte die Plattform eine neue Spezie von 3D Drucker vor, der AdderFab (Video […]

  23. MikeM says:

    Congratulations – that is wonderful!

  24. MikeM says:

    Congratulations – that is wonderful!

  25. Sean Taffert says:

    Nice job!
    I’ve been following the antics on this site for a while. Really great work.
    If you ever need mechanical help and/or know how commercial system solve some of the problems, I’d be happy to help.

  26. Sean Taffert says:

    Nice job!
    I’ve been following the antics on this site for a while. Really great work.
    If you ever need mechanical help and/or know how commercial system solve some of the problems, I’d be happy to help.

  27. Andrew Cady says:

    Three key questions:

    (1) Is this design to be open source?

    (2) Is this printer capable of creating usable molds for clonedel reprap parts?

    (3) What can we expect these to cost to make? (& how much is that print head?)

    • admin says:

      Andrew, nice email address! We will provide details as we always do. It may not be clear BUT we’re at a University AND we’ve been on break the past two weeks.

      1.) yes that was part of the original design spec. This is OUR choice and has been from the beginning.
      2.) yes. In fact, any 3D AM system can make the mold masters. We are hoping to re-design all the AdderFab parts to be moldable.
      3.) Our goal cost is about $300-$350. Print heads are used in POS systems and thus widely available at a reasonable cost.

  28. Andrew Cady says:

    Three key questions:

    (1) Is this design to be open source?

    (2) Is this printer capable of creating usable molds for clonedel reprap parts?

    (3) What can we expect these to cost to make? (& how much is that print head?)

    • admin says:

      Andrew, nice email address! We will provide details as we always do. It may not be clear BUT we’re at a University AND we’ve been on break the past two weeks.

      1.) yes that was part of the original design spec. This is OUR choice and has been from the beginning.
      2.) yes. In fact, any 3D AM system can make the mold masters. We are hoping to re-design all the AdderFab parts to be moldable.
      3.) Our goal cost is about $300-$350. Print heads are used in POS systems and thus widely available at a reasonable cost.

  29. Jeff says:

    Hello,
    Are you using hp11 or hp85 print heads? Or something different all together?

    Thanks in advance,
    Jeff

    • ganter says:

      Jeff, we are using HP POS printing heads (as their are very available) currently but are exploring something else.

  30. Jeff says:

    Hello,
    Are you using hp11 or hp85 print heads? Or something different all together?

    Thanks in advance,
    Jeff

    • ganter says:

      Jeff, we are using HP POS printing heads (as their are very available) currently but are exploring something else.

  31. Jeff says:

    11’s or 85’s? Trying to determine if one has advantage over the other.

    Thanks for the reply,
    Jeff

    • ganter says:

      jeff, neither. I would choose a head that isn’t chipped (as you may need to do special things to deal with the chip).

  32. Jeff says:

    11’s or 85’s? Trying to determine if one has advantage over the other.

    Thanks for the reply,
    Jeff

    • ganter says:

      jeff, neither. I would choose a head that isn’t chipped (as you may need to do special things to deal with the chip).

  33. Jeff says:

    By chipped you mean electronically chipped, correct? Sorry, somewhat new to the game. Thought they all were electronically controlled.

    Thanks very much for your insight.

    • ganter says:

      Jeff, no, some manufacturers build print heads with special chips that prevent them from being refilled, some provide date of manufacture, etc. These print heads are much more difficult to use in a DIY setting. If you’re trying to build a DIY 3D powder printer, then please look at HM3DP as it will provide most of the details to fab a 3D printer using an existing paper printer.

  34. Jeff says:

    By chipped you mean electronically chipped, correct? Sorry, somewhat new to the game. Thought they all were electronically controlled.

    Thanks very much for your insight.

    • ganter says:

      Jeff, no, some manufacturers build print heads with special chips that prevent them from being refilled, some provide date of manufacture, etc. These print heads are much more difficult to use in a DIY setting. If you’re trying to build a DIY 3D powder printer, then please look at HM3DP as it will provide most of the details to fab a 3D printer using an existing paper printer.

  35. Jeff says:

    Thanks again for the info. We’ve been following your progress for quite some time and really appreciate all of the info you provide.

    Jeff

  36. Jeff says:

    Thanks again for the info. We’ve been following your progress for quite some time and really appreciate all of the info you provide.

    Jeff

  37. Jeff says:

    Our main hurdle has been software issues. We need the ability to print multiple models at one time (production runs) and most info available pertains to one-off type printers and/or software. Definitely making headway, though.

    Thanks again,
    Jeff

    • admin says:

      Jeff, our suggestion is purchase a used machine and take it off-road. It gives you access to good software and a large support community. Good luck.

  38. Jeff says:

    Our main hurdle has been software issues. We need the ability to print multiple models at one time (production runs) and most info available pertains to one-off type printers and/or software. Definitely making headway, though.

    Thanks again,
    Jeff

    • admin says:

      Jeff, our suggestion is purchase a used machine and take it off-road. It gives you access to good software and a large support community. Good luck.

  39. Jeff says:

    Way off-road.

  40. Jeff says:

    Way off-road.

  41. Jeff says:

    Any thoughts on using thermal printheads over Piezoelectric printheads?

  42. Jeff says:

    Any thoughts on using thermal printheads over Piezoelectric printheads?

  43. […] that you then stinter together into a shape, then stinter the layers together into a model. The adderfab project at the university of washington is probably the best known of the open-source projects […]

  44. […] that you then stinter together into a shape, then stinter the layers together into a model. The adderfab project at the university of washington is probably the best known of the open-source projects […]

  45. […] If we are to be prepared, then, we must also be on the lookout for the long noses of innovation. These may be weak signals, outliers, ungainly things, as noses often are. We may not find such things among “best practices’ or among experts. Surveys of what is popular, also may not help us, unless we leave a big space for “other” and pay attention to maybe one or two responses there that are unlike anything else we’ve ever seen. Rather than dismiss these responses as insignificant, it may be that these are the very bits of the future we should be preparing for. To seek out innovation means to pay attention to minority experiences, not because it is politically correct, perhaps, to do so, but because it is where we will find, likely, our innovative future–in the rare event, the weak signal, the random thought, the experiment that failed, the silly thing that becomes the next steam engine or 3d printer. […]

  46. […] If we are to be prepared, then, we must also be on the lookout for the long noses of innovation. These may be weak signals, outliers, ungainly things, as noses often are. We may not find such things among “best practices’ or among experts. Surveys of what is popular, also may not help us, unless we leave a big space for “other” and pay attention to maybe one or two responses there that are unlike anything else we’ve ever seen. Rather than dismiss these responses as insignificant, it may be that these are the very bits of the future we should be preparing for. To seek out innovation means to pay attention to minority experiences, not because it is politically correct, perhaps, to do so, but because it is where we will find, likely, our innovative future–in the rare event, the weak signal, the random thought, the experiment that failed, the silly thing that becomes the next steam engine or 3d printer. […]

  47. […] writes threatening letters to the University of Washington, where student teams built a sub $500 do-it-yourself inkjet powderbed printers based on expired patents–technology in the public domain–, then it becomes clear that […]

  48. […] writes threatening letters to the University of Washington, where student teams built a sub $500 do-it-yourself inkjet powderbed printers based on expired patents–technology in the public domain–, then it becomes clear that […]

  49. […] 3d printed parts for under $500 and operate it for pennies per cubic inch of build material.  Here’s one. Here’s another one.  But because a monopoly-minded company has filed for a pile of […]

  50. […] 3d printed parts for under $500 and operate it for pennies per cubic inch of build material.  Here’s one. Here’s another one.  But because a monopoly-minded company has filed for a pile of […]

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