Physiology and Biophysics

2020-2021 Seminar Series

Sep
24
Thu
2020
PBIO seminar: Henry Colecraft
Sep 24 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am

Deconstructing ubiquitin regulation of ion channels: from mechanisms to translation

Henry M. Colecraft, PhD

John C. Dalton Professor of Physiology and Cellular Biophysics,
and Professor of Pharmacology
Columbia University

Please click the link below to join the webinar: https://washington.zoom.us/j/95963842895?pwd=RGxJK2V1OHpUTlhMVVFBTVpkWW85dz09
Passcode: 092420
Sep
30
Wed
2020
PBIO seminar: Nelson Spruston
Sep 30 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am

Neurophysiological mechanisms of memory guided behavior

Nelson Spruston, PhD

Senior Director of Scientific Programs
Janelia Research Campus
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
 
Please click the link below to join the webinar:
https://washington.zoom.us/j/98977294985?pwd=NzY3eHRCTnFLejdScVQyakRMeGFuZz09 Password: 093020
Oct
5
Mon
2020
PBIO seminar: Elizabeth Buffalo
Oct 5 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am

Reconciling the spatial and mnemonic views of the hippocampus

Elizabeth A. Buffalo, PhD

Professor and Interim Chair, Department of Physiology and Biophysics University of Washington School of Medicine Interim Associate Director for Research Washington National Primate Research Center https://buffalomemorylab.com/ Please click the link below to join the webinar: https://washington.zoom.us/j/96606418447?pwd=c2NuS3ZNd05BYUFzUnNDVlN1V0xIZz09
Oct
22
Thu
2020
Forrest Collman (Allen Institute): Cell-type and cell specific connectivity in mouse visual cortex
Oct 22 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am

Cell-type and cell specific connectivity in mouse visual cortex

Forrest Collman, Ph.D.

Allen Institute
Seminar abstract: Mammalian cortex is striking in its diversity of layers and cell types.  The structure of cortical circuits is shaped by developmental programs where specificity in synapse formation and elimination create  highly specific patterns of cell type specific connectivity.  The cortex is also playing a key role is encoding structural changes that reflect specific experiences and are presumably encoded in structural and molecular changes in individual neurons and the synapses between them.  In order to be able more fully understand the purpose of the diverse set of components that exist in the cortex, we’d like to disentangle cortical connectivity into distinct factors that reflect both a cells type and its individual identity.  Recent progress in large scale electron microscopy and semi-automated methods for tracing connections is creating an opportunity to address these questions at scale.  At the Allen Institute for Brain Science we have produced several large scale cortical EM volumes and with our collaborators have begun extracting biological insights from the raw images.  In this seminar I’ll briefly describe the datasets we have produced, describe some of our early findings in this area and surprises these data have shown us, and sketch out what the future opportunities are for the community to engage with these remarkable datasets. Background on team: https://alleninstitute.org/what-we-do/brain-science/news-press/articles/quest-unravel-connectome data release website: https://microns-explorer.org/ host: Adrienne Fairhall
Dec
10
Thu
2020
Pavan Ramdya (EPFL): Reverse-engineering Drosophila behavior @ https://washington.zoom.us/j/99187870975
Dec 10 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am

Title: Reverse-engineering Drosophila behavior

Pavan Ramdya

Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) Director, Neuroengineering Laboratory https://ramdya-lab.epfl.ch
Abstract: A shared goal of neuroscience and robotics is to understand how systems can be built to move effectively through the world. However, state-of-the-art algorithms for selecting and executing limbed behaviors in robots are still quite primitive compared with those used by animals. To inform robotic control approaches, we are investigating how the fly, Drosophila melanogaster, controls complex limb movements. I will discuss how we are combining 2-photon imaging of the ventral nerve cord in behaving Drosophila with physics-based simulations and neural network modeling to uncover how flies generate flexible behaviors. Host: John Tuthill
Zoom url: https://washington.zoom.us/j/99187870975
Dec
17
Thu
2020
Maria de la Paz Fernandez (Barnard College)
Dec 17 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am

Sites of Circadian Clock Neuron Plasticity Mediate Entrainment in Drosophila.

Maria de la Paz Fernandez, Ph.D.

Barnard College

Seminar abstract:
The circadian clock allows organisms to synchronize their physiology and behavior to the daily environmental changes caused by the rotation of the Earth. Key clock neurons in the circadian timekeeping network of the Drosophila brain display daily rhythms in morphology, and such remodeling has long been considered a clock output mechanism. In this talk, I will present our work describing how specific abrogation of the sites of daily neuronal remodeling, remarkably, has no measurable effects on circadian timekeeping or on any of the major output functions of the clock neuron network. Rather, the loss of these sites of plasticity impairs input pathways and affects the animal’s ability to synchronize their circadian clock to environmental time-cues. Based on these surprising results we propose an alternative model: structural plasticity in critical circadian clock neurons is the basis for proper integration of environmental time-cues and the resetting of the circadian clock. host: Gabrielle Gutierrez
Jan
7
Thu
2021
Don Hilgemann (University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center)
Jan 7 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am

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Speaker: Don Hilgemann

Institute: University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Seminar abstract: host: Gucan Dai (daig@uw.edu) and William N. Zagotta (zagotta@uw.edu)
Jan
21
Thu
2021
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Jan 21 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am

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Jan
28
Thu
2021
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Jan 28 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am

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Feb
4
Thu
2021
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Feb 4 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am

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Feb
11
Thu
2021
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Feb 11 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am

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Feb
18
Thu
2021
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Feb 18 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am

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Feb
25
Thu
2021
Jessica Cardin (Yale)
Feb 25 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am

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Speaker: Jessica Cardin

Institute: Yale
Seminar abstract: host: Sweta Agrawal