Physiology and Biophysics

Seminars

Sep
25
Tue
2018
2018 Lamport Lecture – Richard Vallee @ HSB T-639
Sep 25 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
2018 Lamport Lecture

Cytoplasmic Dynein and Kinesins in Brain Development and Autophagy

Microtubule Motor Proteins Are Involved in a Wide Range of cellular activities.  Recent work in our lab has involved the role of the motor proteins in neuronal migration and neurogenesis in the developing brain.  We have worked out mechanisms by which cytoplasmic dynein, its regulators Nde1 and Ndel1, and LIS1  and the kinesin Kif1a contribute to these functions as well as brain developmental disease. We have also found a new role for the dynein adaptor protein RILP as a master regulator of mTOR-dependent autophagy in neurons. Richard Vallee Professor of Pathology & Cell Biology Columbia University time: 4:00pm location: HSB, T-639 host: Stanley C. Froehner
Oct
1
Mon
2018
“The cell biology and mechanics of asymmetric cell division” – Presented by Department of Biology @ Hitchcock Hall
Oct 1 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Dr. Clemens Cabernard, Assistant Professor Department of Biology University of Washington
“Population Health; Management: A look at Vermont’s All-Payer Model of Health System Transformation” – Presented by Department of Oral Health Sciences @ Health Sciences Building
Oct 1 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
David Grembowski, Ph.D., Professor Health Services & Oral Health Science University of Washington
“Harnessing the immune system for neurological disorder therapeutics” – Faculty Candidate Seminar – Presented by Department of Immunology @ South Lake Union
Oct 1 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Kristen Funk, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Research Associate Department of Internal Medicine Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis
“Neurorehabilitation using novel neural technologies” – Presented by The Graduate Program in Neuroscience @ Health Sciences Building
Oct 1 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Azadeh Yazdan, PhD, Assistant Professor Department of Bioengineering and Electrical Engineering University of Washington
Oct
2
Tue
2018
“Targeted Cortical Reorganization using Optogenetics in Non-Human Primates” – Presented by Center for Cardiovascular Biology and the Mitochondria and Metabolism Center @ South Lake Union
Oct 2 @ 9:00 am – 10:00 am
Azadeh Yazdan, PhD, Assistant Professor Department of Bioengineering and Electrical Engineering University of Washingon
“Routing and remodeling membranes at the synapse” Presented by Department of Biochemistry @ Health Sciences Building
Oct 2 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am
Avital Rodal, Ph.D. Brandeis University
“Investigating the behavior and impact of rationally-designed histone ‘readers’ in the context of cancer” – Presented by Division of Basic Sciences @ Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Oct 2 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Karmella Haynes, Ph.D. Arizona State University School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering
Oct
3
Wed
2018
Sleep: “Disordered breathing during sleep” – Presented by CME Neurology Lecture Series @ Harborview Medical Center
Oct 3 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
V. Kapur University of Washington Pulmonary
Oct
4
Thu
2018
“IRF5 genetic risk and therapeutic strategies to target IEF5 hyper-activation in SLE” – Wilske Seminar Speaker – Presented by Benaroya Research Institute @ Benaroya Research Institute Auditorium
Oct 4 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am
Betsy Barnes, Ph.D., Investigator, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research; Professor, Department of Molecular Medicine and Dep0artment of Pediatrics, Hofstra-Northwell School of Medicine
“The role of microtubule-generated tension in accurate mitotic chromosome segregation” – Presented by Department of Physiology & Biophysics @ Health Sciences Building
Oct 4 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am
Mohan Gupta, PhD Assistant Professor University of Iowa
PBIO seminar series: Mohan Gupta @ G-328 H.S.B.
Oct 4 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am
The role of microtubule-generated tension in accurate mitotic chromosome segregation Mohan ‘Moe’ Gupta, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Iowa State University Hosts: Linda Wordeman and Alex Paredez seminar abstract: To ensure genome stability in mitosis, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) delays anaphase if sister chromosomes are not bound to microtubules from opposite spindle poles. Only in this configuration can dynamic microtubules produce tension across sister kinetochores. The interdependency between kinetochore-microtubule attachment and tension has proved challenging to elucidating the role(s) of tension at kinetochores. Thus, whether the SAC responds simply to kinetochore attachment status, or also to tension status remains obscure. Unlike higher eukaryotes, budding yeast kinetochores bind only one microtubule, simplifying the relationship between attachment and tension. To address the role of microtubule-generated tension in checkpoint signaling, we developed a Taxol-sensitive yeast model that allows tension to be reduced by microtubule stabilization in fully assembled spindles with attached kinetochores. Our results reveal that reducing tension on attached kinetochores delays anaphase onset. The tension-specific delay is transient relative to that imposed by kinetochores that are both unattached and tensionless. Furthermore, the mechanism requires only a subset of the core SAC proteins. Our results demonstrate that reduced tension generates a signal to delay anaphase that is temporally and mechanistically distinct from that characterized for unattached kinetochores.
“Two Misunderstood Topics in Ethics: 2-Physician Consent, and Coercion” – Presented by Department of Neurology Grand Rounds @ Health Sciences Building
Oct 4 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Michael A. Williams, MD, Director, Adult and Transitional Hydrocephalus Program & The Intracranial Hypertension Program Professor, Department of Neurology and Neurological Surgery University of Washington
Oct
5
Fri
2018
“Role of the intestinal microbiota in shaping immune responses in health and disease” – The 2018 Barbara Deeb Lecture – Presented by SLU Seminars [ImmunSeminar] @ Health Sciences Building
Oct 5 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Dan R. Littman, MD, PhD, The Helen L. and Martin S. Krimmel Professor of Molecular Immunology Departments of Pathology and Microbiology NYU School of Medicine, Member of HHMI
Oct
8
Mon
2018
“Data-driven discoveries in neuroscience and behavior” – Presented by Department of Biology @ Hitchcock Hall
Oct 8 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Dr. Bing Brunton Assistant Professor Department of Biology
“The Role of the Intestinal Microbiota in Water Absorption” – Presented by Department of Oral Health Sciences @ Health Sciences Building
Oct 8 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Bruce D. Silverstein, M.D. Adjunct Professor, Oral Medicine University of Washington
“Behavior, Physiology, and Computations in visual object recognition” – Presented by The Graduate Program in Neuroscience @ Health Sciences Building
Oct 8 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Gabriel Kreiman, Ph.D., Professor Children’s Hospital in Boston Harvard Medical School
Oct
9
Tue
2018
“Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine: Pipedream or Possibility?” – Presented by The Center for Cardiovascular Biology and the Mitochondria and Metabolism Center – Breakfast Club @ South Lake Union
Oct 9 @ 9:00 am – 10:00 am
Sanjay Sinha, PhD BHF Senior Clinical Research Fellow & Honorary Consultant in Cardiology University of Cambridge
“Pathogenic role of macrophages in experimental lupus” – Presented by Department of Medicine Division of Rheumatology @ South Lake Union
Oct 9 @ 9:00 am – 10:00 am
Westley Reeves, MD Marcia Whitney Schott Professor and Chief Division of Rheumatology & Clinical Immunology University of Florida
“The autism gene TAOK2 in neurodevelopment and disease” by Department of Biochemistry @ Health Sciences Building
Oct 9 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am
Smita Yadav, Ph.D. Department of Pharmacology University of Washington
“Understanding the heterotypic mitochondrial outer membrane fusion machine” – Presented by Department of Pharmacology @ Health Sciences Building
Oct 9 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm
Suzanne Hoppins, PhD, Assistant Professor Department of Biochemistry University of Washington
Oct
10
Wed
2018
“Full-spectrum flow cytometry: how new technologies may drive changes in multicolor flow cytometry” – Presented by Cell Analysis Facility @ South Lake Union
Oct 10 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am
Maria Jaimes, MD Director Applications Cytek Biosciences
“Brain Injury and Psychological Health Following Combat Deployment: The Invisible Wounds of War” – Presented by UW School of Medicine Science in Medicine @ Health Sciences Building
Oct 10 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Christine Mac Donald, Ph.D., Associate Professor Department of Neurologica lSurgery James and Gaye Pigott Endowed Chair
“Challenges in Optimizing Deep Brain Stimulation” – Presented by UW Institute for Neuroengineering Seminar @ Health Sciences Building
Oct 10 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Howard Chizeck, Professor Department of Electrical Engineering University of Washington
“Trans-skull imaging of brain activity in neonatal mice during spontaneous sleep-wake cycles” – Presented by UW Institute for Neuroengineering Seminar
Oct 10 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Bill Moody, Professor Department of Biology University of Washington
Oct
11
Thu
2018
“Mapping biochemical drivers of phenotypic change” – Presented by Division of Basic Sciences @ Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Oct 11 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Daniel Jarosz, Ph.D. Stanford University Department of Chemical & Systems Biology and Developmental Biology
“Dynamic expression of Id3 defines the stepwise differentiation of tissue-resident regulatory T cells” – IMMUN 550 Research in Progress (RIP) @ South Lake Union
Oct 11 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Jenna Sullivan Graduate Student The Campbell Lab
“Type 1 interferon limits NLRC4 expression and promotes immune escape of Salmonella inside macrophages” – IMMUN 550 Research in Progress (RIP) @ SLU, 850 Republican Street
Oct 11 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Ajay Akhade, PhD Postdoctoral Fellow The Subramanian Lab
“We Can’t Blame Everything on Seizure, Mechanisms of Memory Impairment in Dravet Syndrome” – Presented by Department of Neurology Grand Rounds @ Health Sciences Building
Oct 11 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm
John C. Oakley, MD, PhD, Associate Professor Department of Neurology University of Washington
Oct
15
Mon
2018
“The ecology and sensory biology of the world’s most dangerous animal” – Presented by Department of Biology @ Hitchcock Hall
Oct 15 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Dr. Jeff Riffell, Associate Professor Department of Biology University of Washington