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Featured Research

About

Each year, the Bridges Center offers research grants to faculty, staff, and graduate students.

In a competitive process, applicants submit proposals which are reviewed by members of the Center's Standing Committee.

To apply for funding, click here.

WA State Labor Research

In-depth labor policy and industry analysis in Washington State

Prize-Winning Papers

The best Labor Studies graduate and undergraduate papers

Working Groups

Original research based in faculty/community partnerships

Working Papers Series

Lectures and scholarly papers published by the Bridges Center

Web-Based Programs

Educational websites supported by the Bridges Center

Other Projects

Conferences, forums and other special projects


New Research Grants

Capital City: New York's Fiscal Crisis

Michael Reagan, Department of History

Michael will travel to New York City archives to conduct research for his dissertation on the origins of New York City’s near-bankruptcy in 1975 and the government restructuring that followed. In particular, his research will describe how private interests worked with government to diminish the political power of organized labor and rollback social spending programs.

Funded by Graduate Student Research Grant, 2013-2014

Enterprise Restructuring and Working Class Resistance in China

Shuxuan Zhou, Department of Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

Following the enterprise restructuring of the 1990s, familial and generational relations have shifted in socialist China. With this study, Shuxuan Zhou will look specifically at state-sector enterprise employees in China in Xiamen and Hong Kong. Through personal interviews with former state-sector female workers, as well as interning with the China Labor Bulletin in Hong Kong, Zhou will investigate the family dynamic as a result of labor.

Funded by Graduate Student Research Grant, 2012-2013

New Laboring Subjects under the New Labor Regime: An Exploratory Study of Female Janitorial Workers in South Korea

Jiwoon Yu-Lee, Department of Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

Through archival research and participatory ethnographies with a janitorial workers' union, Jiwoon will explore changing gendered divisions within the working class in South Korea, particularly in the wake of the 1997-2001 Asian debt crisis and IMF-imposed restructuring of the country's labor laws.

Funded by Graduate Student Research Grant, 2013-2014

We Are Not Machines: Labor Disputes and Insurgency Among Chinese Migrant Workers

Anne Greenleaf, Department of Political Science

Chinese workers' recent resistance to poor working conditions, including dramatic strike waves, has gained international media attention. Yet worker resistance within the country varies considerably from region to region. Through fieldwork and extensive interviews with workers and local officials, Anne's study seeks to explain this regional variation.

Funded by Graduate Student Research Grant, 2013-2014

On-going Research

Labor Studies research sponsored by the Bridges Center is on-going.

Available here are updates on recent grants awarded by the Center.

On-going Research

Intercultural Workplace Communication in China

Li Liu, Department of Communication

For Chinese office workers in American branch companies in China, speaking English is a major job requirement, strongly factoring in hiring, promotions and pay scales. Through interviews with American executives, managers, management consultants, and local Chinese employees over a wide spectrum of growing global industries, including software engineering, logistics, and investment banking, Liu will explore how Chinese employees understand their multicultural workplaces, and how understandings differ across cultural backgrounds.

Fall 2011 Update

Through interviews with foreign professionals and local Chinese employees who use English or Chinese as first or second language, Li's research has discovered several sets of speech codes that organizational members use to describe their language experience at work. Further more, these speech codes are not exclusively correlated to their native cultural background; instead, organizational members choose to use either just one set of codes, or combine several sets of codes together while describing their multicultural work experience.

This grant will allow Li to travel to China in November 2011 and conduct on-site visit to companies and organizations, as well as follow-up interviews with informants she talked with over conference calls. This will conclude her dissertation research, covering over two years of investigation and interviews.

Funded by Graduate Student Research Grant, 2010-2011

Islamic Business and Labor in Turkey

Evrim Gormus, International Studies

Recent years have seen the rise of specifically Islamic business associations and enterprises in Turkey. Through interviews with both union and business officials, and a survey of the country's Islamic labor and business press, Gormus will explore how class relations shape such organizations; how class conflict is handled; and to what extent Islamic moral values, ideals of justice, and business ethics inform the relationship between labor and management.

Fall 2013 Update

Gormus reports: "My research sponsored by the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies aimed to unpack some of the complexities around religion and economy by looking at the extent to which the nature of socioeconomic projects designed around religion is shaped by class relations and labor-business relations in Turkey. Turkey has witnessed the rise of so called “Islamic” or “Green Capital” in recent years. Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the Central Anatolia took advantage of the economic opportunity spaces that resulted from Turkey’s export-led trade policies in the 1980s. A far-reaching network of SMEs in the central Anatolian provinces also profited from an abundant stock of unskilled, cheap labor and from in-group religion based norms of trust and cooperation.

My research was based on archival research and in-depth interviews regarding labor unionism in SMEs in the Central Anatolian cities – Kayseri, Konya and Gaziantep. I surveyed the publications of the Islamic labor confederation, Hak-Is, and businessmen association, MUSIAD and local newspapers and periodicals published in these cities. I also interviewed Islamic businessmen and the representatives of Hak-Is in order to analyze the relationship between class identity and non-economic sources of identity created by Islam among small and medium-size enterprises.

I have been using the findings of the research in my dissertation which comparatively analyzes Islamic business groups and state relations in Turkey and Egypt. I am expecting to defend my dissertation in Winter 2014."

Funded by Graduate Student Research Grant, 2011-2012

Mapping Indonesian Nurse Migration Patterns Working Overseas and How Government of Indonesia Policies Influence Nurse Migration Patterns

Izana Anggriani, Department of Global Health

Similar to other developing nations, Indonesian health workers often leave their own country to work in wealthier countries. However, very little information exists on the number of Indonesian health workers overseas or their destinations. Anggriani's study aims to explain the patterns of global migration of Indonesian nurses while analyzing how policies of the government of Indonesia influence such patterns.

Fall 2011 Update

Using interviews with Indonesian government officials, private recruitment companies, nursing organizations; a nurses' focus group discussion; an internet survey; and statistics regarding nurse migration patterns overseas, Anggriani's study is nearing completion.

Available data shows that 9,705 Indonesian nurses worked overseas between 1989-2010. Most nurses went to Middle Eastern countries. She found the main reasons nurses chose to work overseas included obtaining a higher salary; improving their nursing knowledge and skills; providing financial support to their family back home in Indonesia; and the opportunity to travel to another country and experience a different culture.

Angrianni concludes: "Indonesian nurses have sought opportunities to work abroad for over 20 years and their numbers will likely increase because of nursing shortages in many countries and a nursing surplus in Indonesia. Typically, multiple entities are at play with the recruitment, placement and monitoring of Indonesian nurses who work overseas with weak systems of coordination and unclear roles for the provision of monitoring nurses who are overseas. Complicating this process is that there is no comprehensive database of nurses who work abroad."

Funded by Duggan Fellowship, 2010-2011

Whether and how unionized occupations pattern voter turnout

Jennifer Laird, Department of Sociology

Unions have long been influential political players, mobilizing union members and non-members alike to participate in elections. In this study, Jennifer will examine what effect a particular occupation's unionization rate has on the voter turnout of both union and non-union workers in that occupation; whether these effects vary by occupation and election type; and how these effects have changed over time.

Fall 2011 Update

Laird has completed her project on unions and voter turnout. Using data from the Current Population Survey, her research found that union members have higher voter turnout in U.S. elections, but the magnitude of the union effect varies by occupation. Union membership is a significantly stronger predictor of voter turnout for protective services workers, administrative assistants, repair workers, agriculture workers, machine operators, and laborers than it is for professionals. For professionals, the turnout effect of belonging to a union is negligible.

The study’s results suggest that belonging to a union provides low-skill workers with exposure to politically-oriented activities such as letter-writing campaigns, policy debates, or news monitoring —exposure that they would not normally receive on the job. For those at the top of the occupational hierarchy, some of the civic skills acquired through union membership may be redundant with civic skills acquired on the job.

Laird's findings are reported in an article currently under review by the journal Social Forces.

Funded by Graduate Student Research Grant, 2010-2011

Downloads

Many of the research grants awarded by the Bridges Center produce labor studies journal articles, books, and other publications.

Available here are papers and publications that resulted from Bridges Center faculty and graduate student grants.

To read or print papers, click on the titles to the right.

PDF Downloads

Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view PDF files. This is a free program available from the Adobe web site. Follow the download directions on the Adobe web site to get your copy.

Click on a report title to download it.

Autonomous Choices and Patriotic Professionalism:
On Governmentality in Late-Socialist China

Lisa Hoffman, Urban Studies, UW Tacoma

In China, where college students once received job assignments from the government upon graduation, graduates now attend job fairs where they have more choice over their future professions. Yet young professionals are still highly influenced by notions of social responsibility and patriotism. Lisa Hoffman looks at the new "patriotic professionalism" of young Chinese professionals in the modern economy.

Funded by Faculty Research Grant, 2003-2004

Published in Economy and Society, Vol. 35, No. 4. (November 2006), pp. 550-570.

Children's Environmental Health Experience and Interest Among Pediatric Care Providers in Vietnam

Nancy Beaudet, Occupational and Environmental Medicine; Dan Jacoby, Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, UW Bothell;
Catherine Karr, Occupational and Environmental Medicine; Quan C. Nguyen, Department of Pediatrics, Thomas Jefferson Medical School; Quynh Kleu, Project Vietnam Foundation, Fountain Valley, CA

Since children's systems are developing, they are particularly vulnerable to workplace chemical and injury hazards. In Vietnam children work in gold mines, timber operations, cargo transport, and other jobs, and mechanisms to track the effects of labor on children's health are limited. Through a survey of pediatric health providers in Vietnam, this study investigates the effect of work on children's health in the country and what initiatives might be taken to address the issue.

Funded by Faculty Research Grant, 2008-2009

Published in Journal of Health and Pollution, Vol. 1, No. 2. (2011).

Living Wage Campaigns and Laws

Margaret Levi and David Olson, Department of Political Science, and Erich Steinman, Department of Sociology

Bridges Chair Emeriti, David Olson and Margaret Levi, led a research program focusing on the living wage movement in the U.S. examining the political and economic implications of living wage campaigns. These campaigns generally advocate establishing a base wage rate (above the minimum wage) for employees working on local, publicly funded contracts. The core idea advanced by the movement is that individuals who work for the public should not be living in poverty, but should at least be earning a living wage.

Funded by a grant from the Russel Sage Foundation to the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies, 2000-2001

Published in WorkingUSA, Vol. 6, No. 3. (Winter 2002–3), pp. 111–132.

'The More Things Change...': The Declining Relative Status of Black Women Workers

Raine Dozier, Department of Sociology

Since the 1970s, workers in the United States have faced increasing wage inequality as the economy has shifted away from manufacturing and towards the service sector – the rich have gotten richer, and the poor have gotten poorer. While women have not been hit as hard due to increased education and other factors, the wage gap between African American and white women has increased significantly. Raine Dozier explores the causes behind this increasing racial inequality.

Funded in part by the Duggan Fellowship, 2006-2007

"To Mediate or Adjudicate? An Alternative for Resolving Whistleblower Disputes at the Hanford Nuclear Site

Angela Day, Department of Political Science

Employees in industries such as oil production, mining, and nuclear power are often in a position to come forward with health, safety and environmental concerns. Policy makers have drafted "whistleblower" laws to protect workers who come forward. Yet many workers remain silent. Day explores why this is the case, and what institutional barriers may be responsible. A grant from the Bridges Center allowed her to conduct research at the Hanford Nuclear Site in eastern Washington.

Funded by Graduate Student Research Grant, 2010-2011

Published in Seattle Journal for Social Justice, Vol. 11, Iss. 2 (January 2013), Article 7.

Labor Studies Research

A complete listing of all labor research grants awarded by the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies, in reverse chronological order from the present to 1994.

Complete Listing

2013-2014

Graduate Student Grants

  • We Are Not Machines: Labor Disputes and Insurgency Among Chinese Migrant Workers
    Anne Greenleaf, Department of Political Science

  • Capital City: New York's Fiscal Crisis
    Michael Reagan, Department of History

  • New Laboring Subjects under the New Labor Regime: An Exploratory Study of Female Janitorial Workers in South Korea
    Jiwoon Yu-Lee, Department of Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

2012-2013

Graduate Student Grants

  • Enterprise Restructuring and Working Class Resistance in China
    Shuxuan Zhou, Department of Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

2011-2012

Graduate Student Grants

  • Deconstructing Child Labor in Peru: The Right to Work or Not to Work
    Dena Aufseeser, Department of Geography

  • Brand Responsbility Project
    Anne Greenleaf and Milli Lake, Department of Political Science

  • Landscapes of Solidarity: Timber Workers and the Making of Place in the Pacific Northwest, 1917-1948
    Steven Beda, Department of History

  • Grassroots Labor in Egypt's Tahrir Revolution
    Shon Meckfessel, Department of English

  • The Effects of Organizational Context and Workplace Control in a Fast Food Establishment
    Brian Serafini, Department of Sociology

2010-2011

Graduate Student Grants

  • Mapping Indonesian Nurse Migration Patterns Working Overseas and How Government of Indonesia Policies Influence Nurse Migration Patterns
    Izana Anggriani, Department of Global Health

  • Silent Voices: Racial Minority Clinicians in Mental Health Counseling
    Chami Arachchi, School of Social Work

  • Landscapes of Solidarity: Timber Workers and the Making of Place in the Pacific Northwest, 1917-1948
    Steven Beda, Department of History

  • When the Whistle Didn't Blow
    Angela Day, Department of Political Science

  • Whether and how unionized occupations pattern voter turnout
    Jennifer Laird, Department of Sociology

  • Intercultural Workplace Communication in China
    Li Liu, Department of Communication

  • Troubling Neoliberal Notions of Farmer Choice: Hybrid Bt Cotton Seed Production Among Adivasis in West India
    Kacy McKinney, Department of Geography

2008-2009

Faculty Grants

  • Workplace Hazards and Conditions Associated with Child Labor in Vietnam
    Nancy Beaudet, Occupational and Environmental Medicine
    Dan Jacoby, Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, UW Bothell
    Catherine Karr, Occupational and Environmental Medicine

  • Religious Preferences and Economic Views in Contemporary America: The Potential for Interfaith Alliances
    Mark Smith, Political Science

Graduate Student Grants

  • Recruitment Abuses in the United States Guest Worker Program
    Christopher Benoit, School of Law

  • The Contradictions of Reproductive Labor in Bahia, Brazil
    Coleen Carrigan, Department of Anthropology

  • Intercultural Customer Service in Indian Call Centers
    Tabitha Hart, Department of Communication

  • An exploratory study of the perception and reality of workplace physical and emotional violence against correctional nurses
    Sarah Veele-Brice, Department of Health Services

2007-2008

Faculty Grants

  • African American Longshore Workers
    Mike Honey, Labor and Ethnic Studies and American History, UW Tacoma

  • Cotton Body Politics and Social Reproduction in Andhra Pradesh, India
    Priti Ramamurthy, Women Studies

Graduate Student Grants

  • Spaces of Survival: Daily-wage Labor Markets in India
    Srinivas Chokkula, Department of Geography

  • 'Integrating a Burning House:' Black Worker Struggles for Affirmative Action in the Age of Deindustrialization
    Trevor Griffey, Department of History

  • The Role of Caring Labor for African American Grandmothers
    Janet Jones, School of Social Work

  • Union Power and Technological Change
    Devin Kelly, Department of Sociology

  • Collaboration and Variation among Nonprofit Organizations and Unions in Hong Kong
    Jaime Kelly, Department of Geography

  • Health Insurance Reform and Self Care in Washington State
    Emily Lynch, Department of Anthropology

2006-2007

Faculty Grants

  • Race Radicals: Asian American radical struggles
    Moon-Ho Jung, Department of History

  • Sweatshop Labor and Subjective Agency in a Globalizing World
    Divya C. McMillin, Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, UW Tacoma

  • Workforce Challenges and Emerging Labor Structures in the U.S. Video Game Industry
    Gina Neff, Department of Communications

Graduate Student Grants

  • The Unionization of Future Activists?: The Biographical Impact of ILWU Membership
    Jon Agnone, Department of Sociology

  • Public Health and the Migrant Workers: A Comparative Study of Anti-Tuberculosis Efforts in Seattle and San Francisco
    Alex Morrow, Department of History

  • Echoes of Mutiny: Migration, Empire, and Indian Revolutionaries on the Pacific Coast
    Seema Sohi, Department of History

Staff Research Grants

  • Broken Lives: Living and Losing the American Dream
    Kellus Stone, Administrator in Industrial Engineering

2005-2006

Faculty Grants

  • Victory through Justice: Mobilizing Labor for Total War
    Elizabeth Kier, Department of Political Science

Graduate Student Grants

  • Punishment and Profit: the Politics of Prisons and Neoliberal Restructuring in the American West
    Ann Bonds, Department of Geography

  • 'Race, Economic Development, and the Remaking of Urban Liberalism in San Francisco, 1950-1980
    Robert Cruickshank, Department of History

  • Standing at the Crossroads: Intersectional Roots, Realities, and Responses of the Welfare Rights Movement to Racial Frames
    Rose Ernst, Department of Political Science

  • Examining the geographies of reproductive health care in Canada and France, focusing specifically on the practice of Midwifery
    Maria Fannin, Department of Geography

  • Socializing Future Faculty to the Norms of Work and Family in Academe
    Kate Quinn, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, College of Education

  • Disciplining the Managerial Subject: Discourses of Political Economy in the United States, 1820-1920
    Joseph Wycoff, Department of History

2004-2005

Faculty Grants

  • Field work in Moscow, Russia to research the working conditions in Russian hospice
    Jose Alaniz, Slavic Languages and Literatures

  • Research on the significance of labor law for the realization of workers' rights in China
    Susan Whiting, Department of Political Science

Graduate Student Grants

  • Common Women: Class and Labor in Nineteenth Century Philadelphia
    Karla Kelling, Department of History

  • How workforce intermediaries such as temp agencies, training programs, unions, and industry associations structure the labor market and effect workers' career paths
    Nicolas Velluzzi, Department of Geography

2003-2004

Faculty Grants

  • Book project that addresses labor, class, and ethnicity in the movement to expel Chinese workers from the American west
    Gail Dubrow, Urban Design & Planning, Architecture

  • Research for book "The Southern Diaspora: How Black Workers & White Southerners Transformed America"
    James Gregory, Department of History

    Published as The Southern Diaspora: How the Great Migrations of Black and White Southerners Transformed America (University of North Carolina Press, 2005)

  • Martin Luther King Jr. and the Memphis Sanitation Strike
    Michael Honey, Ethnic, Gender, and Labor Studies, UW Tacoma

    Published as Going Down Jericho Road: The Memphis Strike, Martin Luther King’s Last Campaign (W.W. Norton & Company, 2008)

  • Managing Labor in Our Neoliberal Times: Educated Workers & Career Planning in Late-Socialist China
    Lisa Hoffman, Urban Studies, UW Tacoma

    Published as "Autonomous Choices and Patriotic Professionalism: On Governmentality in Late-Socialist China," Economy and Society, Vol. 35, No. 4. (November 2006), pp. 550-570

Graduate Student Grants

  • Bangkok Taxi Drivers: Workers, Migrants and Men in the 'Global' City
    Maureen Hickey, Department of Geograpy

  • Comparative study of the impacts of English, American and Turkish labor movements on state-society relations during the period of initial, national labor federation formation
    Brian Mellow, Department of Political Science

2002-2003

Faculty Grants

  • Union Democracy Reexamined: The Case of the ILWU
    Margaret Levi and David Olson, Political Science

  • Making Insurgent Communities: A Study of Suicide Protest and the Unionization of Taxi Drivers in South Korea
    Hyojoung Kim, Department of Sociology

  • Coolies and Cane: Race, Labor, and Sugar Production in the Age of Emancipation
    Moon-Ho Jung, Department of History

  • Published as Coolies and Cane: Race, Labor and Sugar in the Age of Emancipation (Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 2006)

Graduate Student Grants

  • Research investigating the sense of belonging by different racial groups in their high-tech workplaces
    Meredith Reitman, Department of Geography

  • Research on post-World War II tenant activism in New York City
    Roberta Gold, Department of History

  • Research on whether unionization has an impact on Teaching Assistant stipends
    Kisa Watanabe and Evren Damar

2001-2002

Faculty Grants

  • Union Democracy Reexamined
    Margaret Levi and David Olson, Political Science

  • Contingent Academic Labor in Washington State's Community Colleges
    Dan Jacoby, Economics, UW Bothell

  • Labor Rights of Sex Workers
    Patrick Rivers, American Ethnic Studies

  • Interpreting Japanese American Labor History in the Northwest Through Historic Properties
    Gail Dubrow, Associate Dean, Architecture and Urban Planning

  • Published as Sento at Sixth and Main: Preserving Landmarks of Japanese American Heritage (Seattle Arts Commission, 2002)

Graduate Student Grants

  • Negotiating Gender, Work, and Family: Unpacking the Family Wage Gap
    Penelope Huang, Department of Sociology

  • The Impact of Neoliberal Transition Processes on Female Labor in Mexico and Turkey
    Izik Ozel, Department of Political Science

  • Neoliberalism and Democracy? The Gendered Restructuring of Work, Unions and Colombian Public Sphere
    Kim Wan Eyck, Department of Geography

2000-2001

Faculty Grants

  • Work, Landscape, and Culture in the Hispanic Farming Communities of Northern New Mexico and Southern Colorado
    Greg Hicks, School of Law
    Devon Peña, Department of Anthropology

  • A Labor-based Perspective on Martin Luther King
    Michael Honey, African-American, Labor, and Ethnic Studies, UW Tacoma

Graduate Student Grants

  • The Organization of Production in the Southern California-Tijuana Region
    Nicholas Velluzzi, Department of Geography

  • Postwar Tenant Activism in New York City
    Roberta Gold, Department of History

  • The Role of Unions in Port Competition
    Betsi Beem, Department of Political Science

  • Attitudes of Unemployed Chinese Workers Toward Recent Chinese History
    David Davies, Department of Anthropology

Staff Research Grants

  • The Effectiveness of Non-affiliation: The Coalition of University Employees Representing Classified Staff of the University of California
    Karen Long, Fiscal Specialist Supervisor

1999-2000

Faculty Grants

  • Research exploring the influence of the Newspaper Guild 1937-1941
    Roger Simpson, Department of Communications

  • Research focusing on the relationship between high school student employment and their educational performance
    John Robert Warren and Paul C. LePore, Department of Sociology

Graduate Student Grants

  • Research on gaining a more systematic understanding of the conditions under which transnational litigation on behalf of workers might act as a catalyst for transnational labor organizing
    Anne Bloom, Department of Political Science

  • Research regarding children's gender-specific work patterns
    Isabelle Sarton-Miller, Department of Anthropology

  • 'Green Havoc': Environment, Labor, and the State in Costa Rica's Pacific Banana Industry, 1938-1984
    Steve Marquart, Department of History

  • Research in support of Light and Rosenstein's hypothesis of specific demand, that immigration generates specific demands for the services and products of immigrant labor
    April Linton Eaton, Department of Sociology

1998-1999

Graduate Student Grants

  • Research seeking to understand how Pacific Coast salmon cannery labor movements encountered the law during the New Deal and McCarthy eras
    Doug Baker, Department of Political Science

  • Research on gaining a more systematic understanding of the conditions under which transnational litigation on behalf of workers might act as a catalyst for transnational labor organizing
    Anne Bloom, Department of Political Science

  • Fieldwork in the autonomous community of Cataloñia examining the dynamic interdependencies between local labor market institutions and regional economic restructuring and development
    Deron Ferguson, Department of Geography

  • Research exploring the history of industrial engineering from regional perspectives
    Moran Tompkins, Department of History

1997-1998

Faculty Grants

  • Secretary of Labor's Task Force on "Excellence in State and Local Government Through Labor-Management Cooperation"
    Jon Brock, Cascade Center, Graduate School of Public Affairs

  • Research on the work and social culture of the bracero railroad workers contracted to six carriers operating in the Pacific Northwest
    Erasmo Gamboa, American Ethnic Studies

Graduate Student Grants

  • Research on female domestic workers in China
    Hairong Yan, Department of Anthropology

  • The historic significance of Seattle's Waitresses' Union, Local 240
    Carole Davison, Urban Planning

  • Research on the importance of labor market relations between Protestants and Catholics to changing patterns of communal conflict in Northern Ireland
    Niall O Murchu, Department of Political Science

  • The Making of the Second Reconstruction: Race, Class, and Power in Alabama, 1941-1963
    Ken Lang, Department of History

1995-1996

Graduate Student Grants

  • Research on how tactics of organizational dispute affect the development of unions
    Doug Baker, Department of Political Science

  • Research on how neo-liberal reforms in Mexico have affected clientele networks involving skilled labor
    Tom Lewis, Department of Political Science

  • Research on the relations between U.S. and Mexican labor and civil rights groups during the 1930s and 1940s
    Gigi Peterson, Department of History

  • The Making of the Second Reconstruction: Race, Class, and Power in Alabama, 1941-1963
    Ken Lang, Department of History

1994-1995

Faculty Grants

  • A Mexican Immigrant Community on Puget Sound: An Exploratory Study of Labor Market Integration and Community Formation
    Guadalupe Friaz, American Ethnic Studies

  • Labor and Law at the Margins: Alaskan Cannery Workers and the Politics of Legal Mobilization
    Michael McCann, Department of Political Science

  • Oral History Project on E.D. Nixon
    Michael Honey, Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, UW Tacoma

  • Transnationalization and Industrial Location: Labor and Local Politics in West Bengal, India
    Anthony D'Costa, Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, UW Tacoma

Graduate Student Grants

  • Research on the international politics of labor in the post-Cold War period
    Tom Berry, Department of Political Science

  • Labor in the shipbuilding industry in South Korea
    Hwasook Nam, Department of History

  • Research on labor and political culture in the San Francisco Bay Area in the post-World War II period
    Robert Self, Department of History