HBCLS Home Resources Labor Studies Minor

Labor Studies Minor



Full List of Qualifying Courses

Select a department bleow to view the courses that qualify towards the 20 credits required to complete a Minor in Labor Studies.

To learn whether a class will be offered in the future, please contact the relevant department.


UW SEATTLE


UW BOTHELL


UW TACOMA




About

The field of Labor Studies encompasses scholarship and teaching about work, workers and their organizations across many disciplines. From unions and organized labor, to the often unpaid caring labor taking place at home, Labor Studies is broadly conceived to include working men and women everywhere.

The Labor Studies minor brings together a series of courses on labor in core social-science departments. It provides students an interdisciplinary program of study focusing on the importance of labor to the economic, social, political, and cultural evolution of modern societies.


Labor Studies Courses Currently Offered

To view a list of upcoming, current, and recent Labor Studies classes, choose the relevant quarter below:

Current and Upcoming Quarters:

Past Quarters:

Lists updated: 11/1/2016


Requirements

To complete a Minor in Labor Studies, students must satisfy the following minimum requirements:


  1. HISTCMP 249/POL S 249/SOC 266: Introduction to Labor Studies
    (5 credits)
    :


    Conceptual and theoretical issues in the study of labor and work. Role of labor in national and international politics. Formation of labor movements. Historical and contemporary role of labor in the modern world.

    OR

    HISTAA 353: Class, Labor, and American Capitalism (5 credits):


    The history of workers and class formation form early industrialization to the present. Emphasizes the interaction of class with race, ethnicity, gender, and political culture within the context of American economic development. Explores the role of unions, labor politics, and radical movements.

  2. 20 additional credits from courses related to Labor Studies, with no more than 10 credits from one department. To view a list of courses that qualify, see below.

  3. A minimum 2.0 grade is required for each course applied towards the Labor Studies minor.

To apply for a minor, students must have completed at least 90 college credits. Students may declare a minor through a departmental advisor or at the time that they file a graduation application.


Special Topics Courses

Because the subjects of Special Topics courses change regularly, they are not immediately counted towards the Labor Studies Minor. Therefore, even Special Topics courses on labor topics will not automatically appear on students' DARS reports.

To ensure the course is counted, or to request that a course not listed on this website be counted towards the Labor Studies Minor, contact the Labor Studies Minor Advisor at the Bridges Center at 206-543-7946, or hbcls@u.washington.edu.


Questions?

For information about Labor Studies courses at the University of Washington and the Labor Studies Minor, contact the Labor Studies Minor Advisor at the Bridges Center at 206-543-7946, or hbcls@u.washington.edu.







Labor Studies Minor - Full List of Qualifying Courses

UW Seattle


American
Ethnic Studies
(AES)

  • Asian-American Studies (AAS)
  • Chicano Studies (CHSTU)

AAS 101 - Introduction to Asian American Cultures

Credits: 5

Department: Asian-American Studies

Description: Provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the United States. Examines issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality, immigration/migration, citizenship, labor, racialization, exclusion, social and political activism and social movements, family, community-building, war, imperialism, sovereignty, (post) colonialisms, transnationalism, culture, and creative expressions.


AAS 206 - Contemporary Problems of Asian Americans

Credits: 5

Department: Asian-American Studies

Description: Critically examines contemporary Asian and Pacific Islander American issues, ranging from the Cold War era to the present-day America. Topics include ethnic enclaves, community-building, civil rights, identity problems, family conflict, social organizations, political movements, and immigration.


AAS 350 - Critical Overseas Chinese/Chinese American Histories

Credits: 5

Department: Asian-American Studies

Description: Explores the differences and similarities of race, class, gender, sexuality, and generation influence on the life experiences of the Chinese (among the most diasporic people in the world) in America.


AES 322/GWSS 300 – Gender, Race, and Class in Social Stratification

Credits: 5

Department: American Ethnic Studies / Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

Description: The intersection of race and gender in the lives of women of color in the United States from historical and contemporary perspectives. Topics include racism, sexism, activism, sexuality, and inter-racial dynamics between women of color groups.


AES 461 - Comparative Ethnic Race Relations in the Americas

Credits: 5

Department: American Ethnic Studies

Description: Sketches the ethnoracial systems operating in American society. Studies these systems as systems and examines their institutional and interpersonal dynamics. Compares ethnoracial systems in order to arrive at empirical generalizations about race/ethnorelations in the Americas. Offered: jointly with SOC 461.


CHSTU 200 - Latinos in the United States

Credits: 5

Department: Chicano Studies

Description: Studies broad patterns of inequality formed by historical forces, race, ethnicity, nationality, gender, immigration, and social capital. Analyzes rapid growth and adjustment of old and newly established Latino communities, resulting from transnational migration from Latin America.


CHSTU 254 - Northwest Latinos: History, Community, Culture

Credits: 5

Department: Chicano Studies

Description: Traces the history and development of the Latino community in the Pacific Northwest. The study engages racial and ethnic identities, rural to urban, inter-regional, and trans-border migration, and labor and economy to approach issues of marginalization. The Latino community is also contrasted across rural and urban spaces.


CHSTU 260 - Introduction to Chicano Politics

Credits: 5

Department: Chicano Studies

Description: Surveys the political position and activities of Mexican-American peoples in the United States from two perspectives: (1) Chicanos as objects of the political process of U.S. life, (2) contributions of the Chicano people to U.S. politics.


CHSTU 342 - Working Latinas and Latinos: Changing Sites of Identity in Daily Life

Credits: 5

Department: Chicano Studies

Description: Sociological examination of Latina/o working lives. Focuses on inequalities and power relations that shape diverse socio-economic working experiences and social change across distinct Latino communities. Covers race and gender consciousness, informal/formal work, labor recruitment, changing contexts of home and family, youth and children's work, entrepreneurship, organizing, and immigration and labor legislation.


CHSTU 354 - Unions, Labor, and Civil Rights in California and Pacific Northwest Agriculture

Credits: 5

Department: Chicano Studies

Description: Comparative study of Southwest and Pacific Northwest farm workers against the social movement of the 1960's, its significance in the socio-political development of the Chicano civil rights movement, and its legacy. Uses historical and social science research methods along with analytical criticism to examine the period of social history.


CHSTU/ANTH 416 - Comparative Social Movements: Mexico and the United States

Credits: 5

Department: Chicano Studies

Description: Historical, ethnographic, and theoretical perspectives in the study of Mexican-origin communities in social movements in Mexico and the United States with a focus on workers, immigrants, peasants, women, indigenous peoples, and students as forces of collective mobilization and social, cultural, and political change.


Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 339/GWSS 339/JSIS A 339 – Social Movements in Contemporary India

Credits: 5

Department: Anthropology / Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies / International Studies

Description: Covers issues of social change, economic development, and identity politics in contemporary India studied through environmental and women's movements. Includes critiques of development and conflicts over forests, dams, women's rights, religious community, ethnicity, and citizenship.


ANTH 345/GWSS 345/JSIS B 345 – Women and International Economic Development

Credits: 5

Department: Anthropology / Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies / International Studies

Description: Questions how women are affected by economic development in Third World and celebrates redefinitions of what development means. Theoretical perspectives and methods to interrogate gender and development policies introduced. Current processes of globalization and potential for changing gender and economic inequalities assessed.


ANTH 371 - Anthropology of Development

Credits: 5

Department: Anthropology

Description: Development refers to social, economic, cultural, political transformations viewed as progress. Studied from anthropological perspectives. Historical, social context for emergence of ideas of development. Role of development in promoting national cultures. Impact of development on individual citizenship, families, rural-urban relations, workers, business, environment.


ANTH 373 – Labor, Identity and Knowledge in Health Care

Credits: 5

Department: Anthropology

Description: Presents anthropological perspectives on provision of health care as a complex social phenomenon. Examines division of labor, and how social groups come to occupy particular positions. Considers how knowledge and skills are gained (through experience and/or formal education), how they are recognized and valued, and may become sources of identity.


ANTH/CHSTU 416 - Comparative Social Movements: Mexico and the United States

Credits: 5

Department: Anthropology / Chicano Studies

Description: Historical, ethnographic, and theoretical perspectives in the study of Mexican-origin communities in social movements in Mexico and the United States with a focus on workers, immigrants, peasants, women, indigenous peoples, and students as forces of collective mobilization and social, cultural, and political change.


ANTH 448/JSIS A 448 - Modern Korean Society

Credits: 5

Department: Anthropology / International Studies

Description: Social organization and values of twentieth-century Korea. Changes in family and kinship, gender relations, rural society, urban life, education, and industrial organization since 1900. Differences between North and South Korea since 1945.


ANTH 463 - Critiques of Contemporary Capitalism

Credits: 5

Department: Anthropology

Description: Karl Marx inaugurated radical reworkings of both social theory and political action. Begins with some of his seminal writings, then considers the Frankfurt School, British labor theory, and postcolonial theory. Uses these readings to understand economy and subjectivity produced through the aporias of late capitalism.


ANTH 488 - Agroecology

Credits: 5

Department: Anthropology

Description: Cross-cultural survey of agroecological research methods, theoretical problems, policy issues, and ethical debates. Local knowledge and ethnoscientific bases of alternative agriculture. Comparative political ecology of agroecosystems with a focus on indicators of social equity and ecological sustainability.


Comparative History of Ideas (CHID)

CHID 309 / HIST 309 - Marx and the Marxian Tradition in Western Thought: The Foundations of Modern Cultural Criticism

Credits: 5

Department: Comparative History of Ideas / History

Description: Critically examines the formation of modern Western culture, politics, and society through an historical analysis of the work of Karl Marx and the thinkers, artists, and activists who assimilated and transformed Marxian concepts from the late 19th century to the present.


CHID 485 /HSTCMP 485 - Comparative Colonialism

Credits: 5

Department: Comparative History of Ideas, Comparative and Transregional History

Description: Explores the historic roots and practices of colonialism throughout the world, focusing on the roles of nationalism, cosmopolitanism, and imperial domination. Treats colonialism as a world event whose effects continue to be felt and whose power needs to be addressed. Offered: jointly with CHID 485.


Communication (COM)

COM 339 - The Business of Media in the Digital Age

Credits: 5

Department: Communication

Description: Examines the production of media within changing social, technological, and economic contexts. Emphasizes how new technologies can change the market for media goods and media experiences and the ways in which mediated production pervades contemporary economic life.


COM 342 - Media Structure

Credits: 5

Department: Communication

Description: Industrial organization and culture; consumer and producer decisions; public policy toward media; workforce and unions. Media role in culture and political economy.


Economics (ECON)

ECON 409 / POL S 409 - Undergraduate Seminar in Political Economy

Credits: 5

Department:Political Science / Economics

Description: Seminar in political economy with focus on Marxian and public choice approaches to political economy. Explores the questions raised by each approach, the assumption(s) and testability of hypotheses, and applies these approaches to a number of problems in political economy.


ECON 443 - Labor Market Analysis

Credits: 5

Department: Economics

Description: Determinants of employment and incomes in the United States: analysis of individual and firm decisions and of equilibrium in the labor market. Topics include decisions to work and retire, education and occupation choices, compensation, discrimination, poverty, unemployment and unions. Examination of policy issues affecting the labor market.


ECON 444 - Topics in Labor Market Analysis

Credits: 5

Department: Economics

Description: In-depth analysis of special topics in the operation of labor markets and public policies affecting incomes and employment. Course content varies by instructor.


Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences (ENV H)

ENV H 453 – Industrial Hygiene

Credits: 3

Department: Environmental Health

Description: Introduction to the principles and scientific foundation of industrial hygiene. Examines the anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and control of work place hazards to health and safety. Focuses on the first three functions, but includes some consideration of control methods.


ENV H 460 – Occupational Safety Management

Credits: 4

Department: Environmental Health

Description: Explores industrial organization and methods of integrating safety and industrial hygiene programs with industrial operations. Investigates philosophic issues related to industrial safety and health such as responsibility for safety, dependency on safe practice, and hierarchy of prevention. Contains numerous case problems and student involvement opportunities.


ENV H 462 – Technical Aspects of Occupational Safety

Credits: 3

Department: Environmental Health

Description: Reviews federal OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) and state WISHA (Washington Industrial Safety and Heath Act) standards. Explores the impact of these regulations on industry, particularly construction. Upon completion of the course, students receive an OSHA 510 30-hour Construction Safety and Health certification.


ENV H 490 – Physical Agents in the Workplace

Credits: 1-6

Department: Environmental Health

Description: In-depth study of a current environmental health topic.


Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies (GWSS)

GWSS 300/AES 322 – Gender, Race, and Class in Social Stratification

Credits: 5

Department: Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies / American Ethnic Studies

Description: The intersection of race and gender in the lives of women of color in the United States from historical and contemporary perspectives. Topics include racism, sexism, activism, sexuality, and inter-racial dynamics between women of color groups.


GWSS 333/JSIS B 333 – Gender and Globalization: Theory and Process

Credits: 5

Department: Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies / International Studies

Description: Theoretical, historical, and empirical analysis of how current processes of globalization are transforming the actual conditions of women's lives, labor, gender ideologies, and politics in complex and contradictory ways. Topics include feminist exploration of colonialism, capitalism, economic restructuring policies, resistance in consumer and environmental movements.


GWSS 339/ANTH 339/JSIS A 339 – Social Movements in Contemporary India

Credits: 5

Department: Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies / Anthropology / International Studies

Description: Covers issues of social change, economic development, and identity politics in contemporary India studied through environmental and women's movements. Includes critiques of development and conflicts over forests, dams, women's rights, religious community, ethnicity, and citizenship.


GWSS 345/ANTH 345/JSIS B 345 – Women and International Economic Development

Credits: 5

Department: Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies / Anthropology / International Studies

Description: Questions how women are affected by economic development in Third World and celebrates redefinitions of what development means. Theoretical perspectives and methods to interrogate gender and development policies introduced. Current processes of globalization and potential for changing gender and economic inequalities assessed.


GWSS 383/HSTAA 373 – Social History of American Women to 1890

Credits: 5

Department: Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies / History of North America

Description: A multi-racial, multicultural study of women in the United States from the seventeenth century to 1890 emphasizing women's unpaid work, participation in the paid labor force, charitable and reform activities, and nineteenth century social movements. Uses primary materials such as diaries, letters, speeches, and artifacts.


GWSS 384/HSTAA 374 – Social History of American Women in the Twentieth Century

Credits: 5

Department: Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies / History of North America

Description: Analyzes major themes in the history of women in North America from 1890 through the 1990s. Themes include family and community formation, social activism, education, paid and unpaid labor patterns, war, migration, and changing conceptions of womanhood and femininity in the twentieth century.


GWSS 385 – Women and Activism in the U.S., 1820-1990s

Credits: 5

Department: Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

Description: Analyzes how U.S. social reform movements between the 1820s and the 1990s shaped discourses of gender, race, class, nation, and citizenship. Social movements include temperance, anti-prostitution, prision reform, dress reform, reproductive rights, eugenics, suffrage/anti-suffrage, abolitionism, labor, the "mothers' movement," civil rights, QBLTQ movement and dis/abilities, and evangelicalism.


GWSS/GEOG 476 - Women and the City

Credits: 5

Department: Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies / Geography

Description: Explores the reciprocal relations between gender relations, the layout of cities, and the activities of urban residents. Topics include: feminist theory and geography (women, gender, and the organization of space); women and urban poverty, housing and homelessness; gender roles and labor patterns; geographies of childcare; and women and urban politics.


Geography (GEOG)

GEOG 123/JSIS 123 - Introduction to Globalization

Credits: 5

Department: Geography / International Studies

Description: Provides an introduction to the debates over globalization. Focuses on the growth and intensification of global ties. Addresses the resulting inequalities and tensions, as well as the new opportunities for cultural and political exchange. Topics include the impacts on government, finance, labor, culture, the environment, health, and activism.


GEOG 208 - Geography of the World Economy: Regional Fortunes and the Rise of Global Markets

Credits: 5

Department: Geography

Description: Examines the relationship between the globalization of economic activity and regional development. Topics include international trade, colonialism, industrial capitalism, advanced capitalism, and the globalization of labor markets.


GEOG 230 - Geographies of Global Inequality

Credits: 5

Department: Geography

Description: Addresses increasing global inequalities by focusing on shifting spatial division of labor and the role of the international development industry in shaping economic and social inequality. Examines relationships between economic globalization, development industry, and rising global inequality: reviews the history and record of the international development project, and asks what it means to say that Western, advanced economies are not the norm.


GEOG 271 - Geography of Food and Eating

Credits: 5

Department: Geography

Description: Examines development of world food economy, current responses to instabilities and crises, and issues relating to obesity, hunger, and inequality in relation to food systems. Explores political, social, and economic dimensions of food and eating in particular spaces, places, environments, contexts, and regions. Uses the theme of food and eating to examine key concepts from human geography and thereby provides an introduction to the discipline.


GEOG 331 - Global Poverty and Care

Credits: 5

Department: Geography

Description: Explores the causes and patterns of global poverty, and the urgent need for studies of care in both academic work and public policy. Considers the possibilities and challenges of caring across distance, and ways to respectfully engage with people in different places.


GEOG 342 - Geography of Inequality

Credits: 5

Department: Geography

Description: Geographies of social, political, and economic inequality. Focus is usually on North American cities. Examines the theoretical underpinning of inequality. Explores topics such as the spatial distribution of wealth and poverty, the geographies of exclusion, and discrimination in paid employment and housing.


GEOG 371 - World Hunger and Agricultural Development

Credits: 5

Department: Geography

Description: Addresses world hunger and poverty in relation to agricultural development, food security policy, the globalization of food and agriculture and social movements. Explores the problem and historical persistence of hunger across geographic scale and examines the debates about how hunger can be eradicated.


GEOG 432 - Geographies and Politics of Poverty and Privilege

Credits: 5

Department: Geography

Description: Examines theories and case studies across the Americas to understand geographies and politics of poverty and inequality. Outlines key concepts related to the reproduction of inequality/poverty, particularly theories of class, gender, and race and examines the mechanisms through which knowledge and action on poverty and inequality are (re)produced.


GEOG 439 - Gender, Race, and the Geography of Employment

Credits: 5

Department: Geography

Description: Focuses on the geography of employment for men and women of different racial and ethnic backgrounds in American cities. Presents evidence on labor market inequality for different groups and explanations of these differences. Emphasizes the importance of a spatial perspective in understanding employment outcomes for women and minorities.


GEOG 476/GWSS 476 - Women and the City

Credits: 5

Department: Geography / Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

Description: Explores the reciprocal relations between gender relations, the layout of cities, and the activities of urban residents. Topics include: feminist theory and geography (women, gender, and the organization of space); women and urban poverty, housing and homelessness; gender roles and labor patterns; geographies of childcare; and women and urban politics.


GEOG 479 - Diversity and Segregation in Cities

Credits: 5

Department: Geography

Description: Explores segregation and diversity within cities in the United States and elsewhere. Topics include the history of segregation; the measurement and dynamics of segregation and diversity; explanations for change in segregation and diversity in neighborhoods; and the effects of neighborhood segregation and diversity on social and economic outcomes for residents.


History (HSTRY)

  • Comparative and Transregional History (HSTCMP)
  • History of North America
    (HSTAA)
  • History of Asia (HSTAS)
  • History of Latin America and the Carribean (HSTLAC)

HISTCMP 249/POL S 249/SOC 266 – Introduction to Labor Studies

Credits: 5

Department: Comparative and Transregional History / Political Science / Sociology

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Description: Conceptual and theoretical issues in the study of labor and work. Role of labor in national and international politics. Formation of labor movements. Historical and contemporary role of labor in the modern world.

NOTE: This course is a requirement of the Labor Studies Minor. The course does not count towards the 20 additional elective credits required for the Minor UNLESS HISTAA 353: Class, Labor, and American Capitalism has already been taken.


HISTCMP 265 - Modern Revolutions Around the World

Credits: 5

Department: Comparative and Transregional History

Description: Introduces the causes, processes, and legacies of modern revolutions. Cases include the American, French, Mexican, Russian, and Chinese Revolutions. Special attention given to how these and other revolutions have shaped the modern world.


HSTCMP 309/CHID 309 - Marx and the Marxian Tradition in Western Thought: The Foundations of Modern Cultural Criticism

Credits: 5

Department: Comparative and Transregional History / Comparative History of Ideas

Description: Critically examines the formation of modern Western culture, politics, and society through an historical analysis of the work of Karl Marx and the thinkers, artists, and activists who assimilated and transformed Marxian concepts from the late 19th century to the present.


HSTCMP 440 /JSIS B 440 - The Communist Experience Around the World

Credits: 5

Department: Comparative and Transregional History / International Studies

Description: Communism from its origins in the Bolshevik faction of Russian social democracy to the present, treating the development of the ideology, the various communist parties, and the communist states.


HISTCMP 449 - Issues in Comparative Labor History

Credits: 5

Department: Comparative and Transregional History

Description: Role of labor in the modern world. Emphasis on the centrality of workers' struggles in the evolution of national societies on the conceptual, research, and expository strategies of contemporary students of the labor movement and on differences and relationships between labor in developed and underdeveloped countries.


HISTCMP 457 / POL S 457 - Topics in Labor Research

Credits: 5

Department: Comparative and Transregional History / Political Science

Description: Analysis of the post-World War II decline of national labor movements and strategies employed to reverse this trend. Requires a major research project on organizing, bargaining, or another question in labor studies.


HSTCMP 485 /CHID 485 - Comparative Colonialism

Credits: 5

Department: Comparative and Transregional History / Comparative History of Ideas

Description: Explores the historic roots and practices of colonialism throughout the world, focusing on the roles of nationalism, cosmopolitanism, and imperial domination. Treats colonialism as a world event whose effects continue to be felt and whose power needs to be addressed. Offered: jointly with CHID 485.


HSTAA 105 - The Peoples of the United States

Credits: 5

Department: History of North America

Description: History of diverse peoples who have come together through conquest and immigration since 1500, including Native Americans, Europeans, Africans, Asians, and Latin Americans. Explores contributions of may peoples with special attention to changing constructions of race and ethnicity and evolving understandings of what it means to be American.


HSTAA 205 - Asian American History

Credits: 5

Department: History of North America

Description: Introductory history of Asian Indians, Chinese, Filipinos, Japanese and Koreans in the United States from the 1840s to the 1960s. Major themes include imperialism, labor migration, racism, community formation, and resistance.


HSTAA 230 - Race and Power in America, 1861-1940

Credits: 5

Department: History of North America

Description: Explores race and the shaping of American society between the Civil War and World War II. Topics include reconstruction, segregation and lynching, immigration and naturalization, imperialism, and movements for social justice.


HSTAA 322 - African-American History, 1865 To The Present

Credits: 5

Department: History of North America

Description: African-American experience from Reconstruction to the present, emphasizing the variety of African-American political expression. Gender and class differences closely examined, as well as such constructs as "community," "race," and "blackness."


HSTAA 353 - Class, Labor, and American Capitalism

Credits: 5

Department: History of North America

Description: The history of workers and class formation form early industrialization to the present. Emphasizes the interaction of class with race, ethnicity, gender, and political culture within the context of American economic development. Explores the role of unions, labor politics, and radical movements.

NOTE: This course is a requirement of the Labor Studies Minor. The course does not count towards the 20 additional elective credits required for the Minor UNLESS HISTCMP 249/POL S 249/SOC 266: Introduction to Labor Studies has already been taken.


HSTAA 373/GWSS 383 – Social History of American Women to 1890

Credits: 5

Department: History of North America / Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

Description: A multi-racial, multicultural study of women in the United States from the seventeenth century to 1890 emphasizing women's unpaid work, participation in the paid labor force, charitable and reform activities, and nineteenth century social movements. Uses primary materials such as diaries, letters, speeches, and artifacts.


HSTAA 374/GWSS 384 – Social History of American Women in the Twentieth Century

Credits: 5

Department: History of North America / Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

Description: Analyzes major themes in the history of women in North America from 1890 through the 1990s. Themes include family and community formation, social activism, education, paid and unpaid labor patterns, war, migration, and changing conceptions of womanhood and femininity in the twentieth century.


HSTLAC 185 - Race, Gender, and Class in Latin America and the Carribean

Credits: 5

Department: History of Latin America and the Carribean

Description: Explores the power struggles generated by imperial expansion, colonialism, and processes of nation-formation (1400 to the present) in the forging of Latin America and the Caribbean. Examines how gender, race, sex, and class became crucial means to sustain, navigate, and challenge domination as well as to imagine alternative futures.


HSTLAC 386 - The Challenges of Post-Coloniality in Latin America and the Caribbean

Credits: 5

Department: History of Latin America and the Carribean

Description: Explores the legacies of, and ruptures from, colonialism and the new challenges Latin American and Caribbean peoples faced throughout the years after their struggles for independence from direct European rule. Emphasis on analysis of the negotiations and challenges entailed in the dynamic processes of national state formation in comparative perspective.


HSTAA 482 - The History of Brazil: Colonial Period to the Present

Credits: 5

Department: History of Latin America and the Carribean

Description: Colonial foundations; the first and second empires; the old and new republics; current problems; prospects for the future.


International Studies (JSIS)

  • Area Studies
    (JSIS A)
  • Global/Thematic
    (JSIS B)
  • International Studies
    (JSIS D)

JSIS 123/GEOG 123 - Introduction to Globalization

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies / Geography

Description: Provides an introduction to the debates over globalization. Focuses on the growth and intensification of global ties. Addresses the resulting inequalities and tensions, as well as the new opportunities for cultural and political exchange. Topics include the impacts on government, finance, labor, culture, the environment, health, and activism.


JSIS A 324/LSJ 322 - Human Rights in Latin America

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies / Law, Societies and Justice

Description: Overview of human rights issues and their recent evolution in Latin American history; military dictatorships; contemporary challenges in the region's democracies. Human rights concerns in relation to broader sociopolitical context.


JSIS A 339/ANTH 339/GWSS 339 – Social Movements in Contemporary India

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies / Anthropology / Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

Description: Covers issues of social change, economic development, and identity politics in contemporary India studied through environmental and women's movements. Includes critiques of development and conflicts over forests, dams, women's rights, religious community, ethnicity, and citizenship.


JSIS A 355 / SOC 355 - Social Change in Latin America

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies / Sociology

Description: Explores cultures, identities, political economy, and popular mobilization in Latin America. Examines relations of power and production between social classes and ethnic groups, as well as ideologies and intellectual movements.


JSIS A 408 / POL S 442 - Government and Politics of China

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies / Political Science

Description: Post-1949 government and politics, with emphasis on problems of political change in modern China.


JSIS A 448 / ANTH 448 - Modern Korean Society

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies / Anthropology

Description: Social organization and values of twentieth-century Korea. Changes in family and kinship, gender relations, rural society, urban life, education, and industrial organization since 1900. Differences between North and South Korea since 1945.


JSIS B 324 - Immigration

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies

Description: Introduces key theoretical debates in international migration. Examines immigrants' political, economic, religious, and social integration into host societies, and continued ties to homelands. Experiences of voluntary and involuntary immigrants, of the second generation, and of incorporation into America and Europe. Designed around interdisciplinary texts and fieldwork in Seattle.


JSIS B 333/GWSS 333 – Gender and Globalization: Theory and Process

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies / Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

Description: Theoretical, historical, and empirical analysis of how current processes of globalization are transforming the actual conditions of women's lives, labor, gender ideologies, and politics in complex and contradictory ways. Topics include feminist exploration of colonialism, capitalism, economic restructuring policies, resistance in consumer and environmental movements.


JSIS B 345/ANTH 345/GWSS 345 – Women and International Economic Development

Credits: 5

Department:International Studies / Anthropology / Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

Description: Questions how women are affected by economic development in Third World and celebrates redefinitions of what development means. Theoretical perspectives and methods to interrogate gender and development policies introduced. Current processes of globalization and potential for changing gender and economic inequalities assessed.


JSIS B 385 – Industry and the State

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies

Description: Builds on states and markets approach of 200 and 201 through specific examination of effects of industry and industrial structure on political outcomes and roles of state. Emphasis on late-developing and newly developing economies.


JSIS B 386 – Law and Politics of International Trade

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies

Description: Survey of global trade politics in the context of the World trade Organization (WTO), with attention to positive and negative aspects of its governance. Examines the impact of the WTO legal framework on trade relations among developed and developing countries. Covers topics such as dispute settlement, development, safeguards, antidumping, intellectual property, and regionalism.


JSIS B 440 / HSTCMP 440 - The Communist Experience Around the World

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies / Comparative and Transregional History

Description: Communism from its origins in the Bolshevik faction of Russian social democracy to the present, treating the development of the ideology, the various communist parties, and the communist states. Recommended: two history or politics of Europe courses.


JSIS D 450 / SOC 450 - Political Economy of Women and Family in the Third World

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies / Sociology

Description: Theoretical and empirical aspects of the political economy of women and the family in the Third World during the process of development, with a focus on labor. Main theoretical approaches examined and applied to case studies from Asia and Latin America.


Law, Societies, and Justice (LSJ)

LSJ 322/JSIS A 324 - Human Rights in Latin America

Credits: 5

Department: Law, Societies, and Justice / International Studies

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Angelina Snodgrass Godoy

Description: Overview of human rights issues and their recent evolution in Latin American history; military dictatorships; contemporary challenges in the region's democracies. Human rights concerns in relation to broader sociopolitical context.


LSJ 329 - Immigration, Citizenship, and Rights

Credits: 5

Department: Law, Societies, and Justice

Description: A sociological examination of citizenship. Focus on how immigration law and polices shape divers meanings, practices, and statues, of citizenship in varied context, Topics include migration theories, state control, stage of legal status, relationship to race and gender ideology, as well as labor and civil society, in shaping membership and rights.


LSJ 360 / POL S 360 - Introduction to United States Constitutional Law

Credits: 5

Department: Law, Societies and Justice / Political Science

Description: Growth and development of the United States Constitution as reflected in decisions of the Supreme Court; political, social, and economic effects.


LSJ 422 - Immigrants, Labor, and Legality

Credits: 5

Department: Law, Societies, and Justice

Description: Provides sociological examination of working immigrants in the United States. Focuses on how immigration and labor legislation shape context of working, worker identity, and rights. Topics include federal and state legislation, employee classification, division of labor, skilled/unskilled, flexibility, legal status, organizing, and relationship to race and gender ideology in shaping contexts of working and rights.


Political Science (POL S)

POL S 249/SOC 266/HISTCMP 249 – Introduction to Labor Studies

Credits: 5

Department:Political Science / Sociology / History

Description: Conceptual and theoretical issues in the study of labor and work. Role of labor in national and international politics. Formation of labor movements. Historical and contemporary role of labor in the modern world.

NOTE: This course is a requirement of the Labor Studies Minor. The course does not count towards the 20 additional elective credits required for the Minor UNLESS HISTAA 353: Class, Labor, and American Capitalism has already been taken.


POL S 406 - Marxian Political Economy

Credits: 5

Department: Political Science

Description: Explores the relationship between social classes, the state, and political power in advanced capitalist societies. Investigates this relationship primarily by means of the tools of Marxian political economy and, in the process, evaluates these tools. Emphasis on theoretical perspectives, although the reading list has a few empirical applications as well.


POL S 360 / LSJ 360 - Introduction to United States Constitutional Law

Credits: 5

Department: Political Science / Law, Societies and Justice

Description: Growth and development of the United States Constitution as reflected in decisions of the Supreme Court; political, social, and economic effects.


POL S 409 / ECON 409 - Undergraduate Seminar in Political Economy

Credits: 5

Department: Political Science / Economics

Description: Seminar in political economy with focus on Marxian and public choice approaches to political economy. Explores the questions raised by each approach, the assumption(s) and testability of hypotheses, and applies these approaches to a number of problems in political economy.


POL S 442 / JSIS A 408 - Government and Politics of China

Credits: 5

Department: Political Science / International Studies

Description: Post-1949 government and politics, with emphasis on problems of political change in modern China.


POL S 457 / HSTMP 457 - Topics in Labor Research

Credits: 5

Department: Political Science / Comparative and Transregional History

Description: Analysis of the post-World War II decline of national labor movements and strategies employed to reverse this trend. Requires a major research project on organizing, bargaining, or another question in labor studies.


Social Work
(SOC W)

SOC W 536 – Social Movements and Organizing: People, Power, and Praxis

Credits: 3

Department: Social Work

Description: Focuses on social, economic, and political problems from an organizer' s perspective, and strategies, tactics, and skills necessary to engage in organizing activities. Emphasizes principles common to community, electoral, union, and issue organizing. Addresses why people organize, how organizing works, and what it takes to be a good organizer. Priority given to Social Work Graduate Students. Undergraduates may apply with permission from instructor.


Sociology (SOC)

SOC 266/HISTCMP 249/POL S 249 – Introduction to Labor Studies

Credits: 5

Department: Sociology / History / Political Science

Description: Conceptual and theoretical issues in the study of labor and work. Role of labor in national and international politics. Formation of labor movements. Historical and contemporary role of labor in the modern world.

NOTE: This course is a requirement of the Labor Studies Minor. The course does not count towards the 20 additional elective credits required for the Minor UNLESS HISTAA 353: Class, Labor, and American Capitalism has already been taken.


SOC 355 / JSIS A 355 - Social Change in Latin America

Credits: 5

Department: Sociology / International Studies

Description: Explores cultures, identities, political economy, and popular mobilization in Latin America. Examines relations of power and production between social classes and ethnic groups, as well as ideologies and intellectual movements.


SOC 360 – Introduction to Social Stratification

Credits: 5

Department: Sociology

Description: Social class and social inequality in American society. Status, power, authority, and unequal opportunity are examined in depth, using material from other societies to provide a comparative and historical perspective. Sociological origins of recurrent conflicts involving race, sex, poverty, and political ideology.


SOC 364 – Women in the Social Structure

Credits: 5

Department: Sociology

Description: Gender and social institutions; the family, politics, education, medicine, law, the labor force. Intersection of gender with other minority statuses such as race, age, socioeconomic status, and sexual orientation. Structural, ideological, and historical determinants of gender relations.


SOC 450 / JSIS D 450 - Political Economy of Women and Family in the Third World

Credits: 5

Department: Sociology / International Studies

Description: Theoretical and empirical aspects of the political economy of women and the family in the Third World during the process of development, with a focus on labor. Main theoretical approaches examined and applied to case studies from Asia and Latin America.


SOC 468 – Sociology of Occupations and Professions

Credits: 5

Department: Sociology

Description: Frameworks for study of occupations and professions; occupational structure and mobility in American society in relation to adult socialization and career development; occupational and professional associations and society.


UW Bothell


Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences

  • Interdisciplinary Studies
    (BIS)
  • American Studies
    (BIS AMS)

BIS 327 - History of U.S. Labor Institutions

Credits: 5

Department: Interdisciplinary Studies, UW Bothell

Description: Examines the evolution of the institutions that have shaped labor. Discusses indentured servitude, slavery, apprenticeship, schooling, wage labor, unions, and the laws that surround each of these institutions.


BIS 433 - Gender, Work and Family

Credits: 5

Department: Interdisciplinary Studies, UW Bothell

Description: Examines the interlocking institutions of gender, work, and family. Explores the impact of changing patterns of work on the lives of men and women and the effect of changes in work and occupations on demography and family patterns.


BIS 441 - Global Labor Markets

Credits: 5

Department: Interdisciplinary Studies, UW Bothell

Description: Explores the history, theory, and institutions that affect labor' s position in an increasingly globalized labor market. Fosters critical inquiry upon the globalization of labor markets and makes connections between global markets and local employment conditions.


BIS 445 - Meanings and Realities of Inequality

Credits: 5

Department: Interdisciplinary Studies, UW Bothell

Description: A socioeconomic investigation into the meanings and realities of inequality using a variety of theoretical frameworks and empirical research. Focuses on the determinants of economic mobility and social status. Addresses discrimination, poverty, welfare, and education.


BISAMS 305 - Power, Dissent, and American Culture

Credits: 5

Department: Interdisciplinary Studies, UW Bothell

Description: Focuses on the relationships between power, inequality, resistance, and difference in the United States. Examines the concept of America through intersecting categories of race, gender, sexuality, class, place, citizenship, slavery, nationalism, empire, immigration, and social change. Uses diverse sources to study culture, politics, and history.


BISAMS 363 - Conflict and Connection in the Americas

Credits: 5

Department: Interdisciplinary Studies, UW Bothell

Description: Examines the Americas as a geographical and historical region. Applies a variety of approaches to specific topics and events, with particular attention to the interplay of politics and culture. Stresses interaction of local, regional, and global dynamics such as colonialism, migration, and slavery. Stresses diverse interpretive approaches within American Studies.


UW Tacoma


Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences

  • Culture, Art, and Communications (T ARTS)
  • Economics (TECON)
  • Ethnic, Gender and Labor Studies (T EGL)
  • History (T HIST)
  • Political Science (TPOL S)
  • Sociology (T SOC)
  • Women Studies (T WOMN)

T ARTS 406 – Labor, Globalization, and Art

Credits: 5

Department: Arts (Tacoma)

Description: Explores issues of labor and globalization through the art process. Experiments with contemporary art practices, making projects that examine work histories and that follow the global journey of a commodity. Discussions focus on the history of labor art and how art is intersecting the global justice movement.


TECON 450 – Labor Economics and Policy

Credits: 5

Department: Arts (Tacoma)

Description: Analyzes of determinants of labor markets outcomes, and the effect of labor market policy in advanced capitalist economies, with primary reference to the United States.


T EGL 101 - Introduction to Ethnic, Gender, and Labor Studies

Credits: 5

Department: Ethnic, Gender and Labor Studies (Tacoma)

Description: Introduces theories, methods, and analytical frameworks for understanding the intersection of race, class, gender, and sexuality by examining key thinkers, texts, ideas, and concepts from across the humanities and social sciences. Teaches the core values and ideals of social justice that are foundational to ethnic, gender, and labor studies.


T EGL 266 - Introduction to Labor Studies

Credits: 5

Department: Ethnic, Gender and Labor Studies (Tacoma)

Description: Examines the role of labor in the contemporary United States and in the global economy. Explores the nature of work within market economies, forms of worker organizing, and the interaction between race, gender, and class within the workplace.


T HIST 322 – American Labor Since the Civil War

Credits: 5

Department: History (Tacoma)

Description: Provides a history of workers and labor institutions from the era of industrialization to the post-industrial era, focusing on labor-management conflict, the rise and fall of unions, and on the role of government, the media, and other forces in determining events. Concludes with an assessment of labor today.


T HIST 416 – Life and Thought: Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, and Angela Davis

Credits: 5

Department: History (Tacoma)

Description: Explores the experiences and thinking of three well-known leaders of African-American protest in the 1960s. Interprets black radicalism in that era and the relationship of these three analysts and activists to their times and to the present.


T HIST 440 – Black Labor in America

Credits: 5

Department: History (Tacoma)

Description: Provides an overview and a detailed consideration of the contributions of the black working class to the making of America. Examines historic racial-economic barriers which have held back development of African-American communities, and the continuing causes and possible solutions to the economic crisis affecting black working people today.


T HIST 441 – Black Freedom Movement in Perspective

Credits: 5

Department: History (Tacoma)

Description: Explores the historical roots and present-day manifestations of movements against racial oppression and for empowerment in the African-American community, focusing heavily on the period since the 1950s.


TPOL S 311 – International Human Rights

Credits: 5

Department: Political Science (Tacoma)

Description: Team-oriented research of the historical origins, theories, basic documents, personalities, institutions, and legal and political processes which have promoted international human rights as a widely accepted legal and moral foundation for a just world order.


TPOL S 410 – Labor Rights and Human Rights

Credits: 5

Department: Political Science (Tacoma)

Description: Examines labor in western society, exploring the historical emergence of various concepts of labor rights and developing an analysis of labor and human rights in contemporary world order. Topics include slavery, labor and liberalism, individualism and collective labor rights under capitalism, economic security, and labor rights in a global economy.


TPOL S 435 – Popular Movements in Latin America

Credits: 5

Department: Political Science (Tacoma)

Description: Examines popular movements in Latin America, including historical background of modern popular organizations, an analysis of the evolution of the discourse surrounding the terms "popular movement," "social movement," and "civil society." Discusses contemporary trade unionism, grass-roots peoples' initiatives, cooperative movements, guerrilla organizations, human rights groups, and feminist movements.


TPOL S 456 – Community and Labor Organizing: A Multicultural Perspective

Credits: 5

Department: Political Science (Tacoma)

Description: Explores current community and labor organizing issues through intersections of gender, race, class, and immigration. Discussions of labor movements, community and environmental coalitions, living wage, social justice, and anti-sweatshop campaigns, in context of globalization. Case studies and issues vary.


TPOL S 480 – Politics, Philosophy, and Economics Seminar

Credits: 5

Department: Political Science (Tacoma)

Description: Provides in-depth treatment of topics in politics and philosophy; political economy; law and policy; economics and policy and ethics and economics. Emphasizes analysis of methodological issues and developing students' research and writing skills.


T SOC 335 – Social Class and Inequality

Credits: 5

Department: Sociology (Tacoma)

Description: Examines the problem of persistent urban poverty in the United States. Explores the differential risk of poverty experienced by racial and ethnic groups and by women and children in the context of the major theories of class stratification. Also discusses the factors that lead to extreme-poverty neighborhoods, how these environments affect the life chances of residents, survival strategies of the poor, and public policy implications.


T SOC 434 - Women, Race, and Class: Identity and Intergroup Relations

Credits: 5

Department: Sociology (Tacoma)

Description: Explores interlocking effects of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality on the life experiences of women in the U.S. Includes: impact of race, ethnicity, and racism on social institutions; women's experiences of racism; struggles of anti-racist women; relationship between racial, class, and sexual identities and feminism, development of dialogue and coalitions between women.


T WOMN 345 - Women and Work in the United States

Credits: 5

Department: Women Studies (Tacoma)

Description: Studies the fundamental changes and continuities in women's work lives in the context of U.S. economic development. Examines multiplicity and diversity of women's work contributions, both paid and unpaid. Highlights both the commonalties among women's work experiences and the differences with regard to life-cycle stage, occupation, and race/ethnicity.


T WOMN 420 - Women in the Global Economy

Credits: 5

Department: Women Studies (Tacoma)

Description: Explores impact of "modernization" and "development" on status and roles of women in selected Western and non-Western societies. Critical analysis of assumptions about women's responses to social change which have guided research, development planning. Examines cultural practices, economic arrangements, government policies to understand opportunities and obstacles confronting women in developing countries today.