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Labor Studies Minor




About

The field of Labor Studies encompasses scholarship and teaching about work, workers and their organizations across many disciplines. From unions and organized labor, to the often unpaid caring labor taking place at home, Labor Studies is broadly conceived to include working men and women everywhere.

The Labor Studies minor brings together a series of courses on labor in core social-science departments. It provides students an interdisciplinary program of study focusing on the importance of labor to the economic, social, political, and cultural evolution of modern societies.

Requirements

To complete a Minor in Labor Studies, students must satisfy the following minimum requirements:


  1. HIST 249/POL S 249/SOC 266: Introduction to Labor Studies (5 credits):
    Conceptual and theoretical issues in the study of labor and work. Role of labor in national and international politics. Formation of labor movements. Historical and contemporary role of labor in the modern world.

  2. 20 additional credits from courses related to Labor Studies, with no more than 10 credits from one department. To view a list of courses that qualify, see below.

  3. A minimum 2.0 grade is required for each course applied towards the Labor Studies minor.

To apply for a minor, students must have completed at least 90 college credits. Students may declare a minor through a departmental advisor or at the time that they file a graduation application.

Advising

NOTE: Some courses, such as Special Topics, will not appear on students' DARS reports. To ensure the course is counted, or to request that a course not listed on this website be counted towards the Labor Studies Minor, or for general information about the Minor, contact the Labor Studies Minor Adviser at the Bridges Center at 206-543-7946, or hbcls@u.washington.edu.

Recommended

In addition to HIST 249/POL S 249/SOC 266: Introduction to Labor Studies, the following courses are recommended but not required to complete the Labor Studies Minor:

  • HSTAA 353: Class, Labor, and American Capitalism (5 credits):
    The history of workers and class formation from early industrialization to the present. Emphasizes the interaction of class with race, ethnicity, gender, and political culture within the context of American economic development. Explores the role of unions, labor politics, and radical movements.






Labor Studies Minor - 2014-2015 Courses

UW Seattle


American
Ethnic Studies
(AES)

  • Asian-American Studies (AAS)
  • Chicano Studies (CHSTU)

AAS 206 - Contemporary Problems of Asian Americans

Credits: 5

Department: Asian-American Studies

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Connie So

Description: Recent Asian and Pacific Islander American issues, from the 1960s to the present. Topics include post-1960s immigration, ethnic enclaves, civil rights, racial and ethnic stereotypes, identity politics, social organizations, community building and political movements.


AAS 350 - Chinese American History and Culture

Credits: 5

Department: Asian-American Studies

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Connie So

Description: Explores the differences and similarities of race, class, gender, sexuality, and generation influence on the life experiences of the Chinese (among the most diasporic people in the world) in America


AES 322/GWSS 300 – Gender, Race, and Class in Social Stratification

Credits: 5

Department: American Ethnic Studies / Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Description: The intersection of race and gender in the lives of women of color in the United States from historical and contemporary perspectives. Topics include racism, sexism, activism, sexuality, and inter-racial dynamics between women of color groups.


CHSTU 200 - Latinos in the United States

Credits: 5

Department: Chicano Studies

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2015

Instructor: Erasmo Gamboa

Description: Historical, social, and economic experience of Latinos in the United States. Major themes include education, labor, class, and gender identity. Analyzes rapid growth of old and newly established Latino communities, based on emigration from Latin America.


CHSTU 254 - Northwest Latinos: History, Community, Culture

Credits: 5

Department: Chicano Studies

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2015

Instructor: Erasmo Gamboa

Description: Traces the history, extent, and development of the Chicano/Latino presence from the early Spanish period to the present. Examines the major contemporary political, social, and economic issues affecting Northwest Chicano/Latinos in a broader national and international context.


CHSTU 260 - Introduction to Chicano Politics

Credits: 5

Department: Chicano Studies

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Elizabeth Salas

Description: Surveys the political position and activities of Mexican-American peoples in the United States from two perspectives: (1) Chicanos as objects of the political process of U.S. life, (2) contributions of the Chicano people to U.S. politics.


CHSTU 342 - Working Latinas and Latinos: Changing Sites of Identity in Daily Life

Credits: 5

Department: Chicano Studies

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Prof. Carolyn Pinedo-Turnovsky

Description: This a sociological examination of Latinas' and Latinos' experiences in work locally (studies in the US) and globally (transnational studies). Our work is to examine the changing conceptions and contexts of work and its impact on Latina/o identity. We will also learn to locate how ideologies of gender, race, ethnicity and nation shape Latinas/os' working lives and impact economic and social inequality. Readings, lectures and discussions will explore different sites of work to capture a broad understand of the diverse ways in which we all labor in daily life. Consequently, as we all participate in different social worlds of work, you are encouraged to share your own observations and insights with the members of our class. Some of the questions that will frame your lens include: What are the ways we can [re]define labor? What are the different ways in which Latinas/Latinos work? How do labor markets and the workplace organize women and men differently across different domains of work? How do race and gender ideology shape Latinas and Latinos' understandings of their identities as workers? What changes result in [re]shaping home and family spaces? How do immigration and government legislation [re]shape and reconfigure employment opportunities as well as gender and race relations?


CHSTU 354 - Unions, Labor, and Civil Rights in California and Pacific Northwest Agriculture

Credits: 5

Department: Chicano Studies

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Prof. Erasmo Gamboa

Description: Comparative study of Southwest and Pacific Northwest farm workers against the social movement of the 1960's, its significance in the socio-political development of the Chicano civil rights movement, and its legacy. Uses historical and social science research methods along with analytical criticism to examine the period of social history.


Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 373 – Labor, Identity and Knowledge in Health Care

Credits: 5

Department: Anthropology

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Marieke Simone Van Eijk

Description: Presents anthropological perspectives on provision of health care as a complex social phenomenon. Examines division of labor, and how social groups come to occupy particular positions. Considers how knowledge and skills are gained (through experience and/or formal education), how they are recognized and valued, and may become sources of identity.


Comparative History of Ideas (CHID)

CHID 480 - Special Topics: Comparative Colonialism

Credits: 5

Department: Comparative History of Ideas

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Vicente Rafael

Description: Examines a different subject or problem from a comparative framework with an interdisciplinary perspective. Satisfies the Gateways major/minor requirement. Offered: AWSp.


Economics (ECON)

ECON 443 - Labor Market Analysis

Credits: 5

Department: Economics

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Prof. Elaina Rose

Description: Determinants of employment and incomes in the United States: analysis of individual and firm decisions and of equilibrium in the labor market. Topics include decisions to work and retire, education and occupation choices, compensation, discrimination, poverty, unemployment and unions. Examination of policy issues affecting the labor market. Prerequisite: 2.0 in ECON 300.


Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences (ENV H)

ENV H 453 – Industrial Hygiene

Credits: 3

Department: Environmental Health

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2015

Instructor: Noah Seixas

Description: Introduction to the principles and scientific foundation of industrial hygiene. Examines the anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and control of work place hazards to health and safety. Focuses on the first three functions, but includes some consideration of control methods.


ENV H 564/IND E 564 – Recognition of Health and Safety Problems in Industry

Credits: 2

Department: Environmental Health / Industrial Engineering

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2015

Instructor: Noah Seixas

Description: Develops skills in occupational health and safety hazard recognition in a variety of important northwest industries. Focuses on process understanding and hazard recognition skills during walk-through inspections of several local facilities, stressing a multidisciplinary approach.


Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies (GWSS)

GWSS 300/AES 322 – Gender, Race, and Class in Social Stratification

Credits: 5

Department: Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies / American Ethnic Studies

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Description: The intersection of race and gender in the lives of women of color in the United States from historical and contemporary perspectives. Topics include racism, sexism, activism, sexuality, and inter-racial dynamics between women of color groups.


Geography (GEOG)

GEOG 123/JSIS 123 - Introduction to Globalization

Credits: 5

Department: Geography / International Studies

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Monica Farias

Description: Provides an introduction to the debates over globalization. Focuses on the growth and intensification of global ties. Addresses the resulting inequalities and tensions, as well as the new opportunities for cultural and political exchange. Topics include the impacts on government, finance, labor, culture, the environment, health, and activism.


GEOG 230 - Urbanization and Development: Geographies of Global Inequality

Credits: 5

Department: Geography

Quarter Offered: Summer 2015, Autumn 2015

Instructor: Michelle Daigle

Description: Examines the processes driving urban growth in Asia, Africa and Latin America. The course examines urbanization in its international context. These issues and their human impacts are discussed in the context of historical and contemporary changes in the international political-economy. The course begins by reexamining some of the defining debates in development studies; population, migration/immigration dynamics, 'overurbanization', protectionism and free trade. The course culminates with a discussion of the human dimensions of broad political-economic processes examining questions of urban employment, shelter and political action. Major themes include: the cultural context of urban growth, the rapid pace of urbanization, indigenous urban forms, and colonial legacies.


GEOG 271 - Geography of Food and Eating

Credits: 5

Department: Geography

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Kathryn Anne Gillespie

Description: Examines food production, distribution, and consumption issues across geographic scales. Focus ranges from the microcosm of the individual body to food and eating at national and global scales. Explores the political, social, cultural, and economic dimensions of food and eating in particular spaces, places, environments, contexts, and regions.


GEOG 476/GWSS 476 - Women and the City

Credits: 5

Department: Geography / Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2015

Instructor: TBA

Description: Explores the reciprocal relations between gender relations, the layout of cities, and the activities of urban residents. Topics include: feminist theory and geography (women, gender, and the organization of space); women and urban poverty, housing and homelessness; gender roles and labor patterns; geographies of childcare; and women and urban politics.


History (HIST)

  • History of the Americas
    (HSTAA)
  • History of Asia (HSTAS)
  • Modern European History (HSTEU)

HISTCMP 249/POL S 249/SOC 266 – Introduction to Labor Studies

Credits: 5

Department: History / Political Science / Sociology

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Lawrence Cushnie

Description: Conceptual and theoretical issues in the study of labor and work. Role of labor in national and international politics. Formation of labor movements. Historical and contemporary role of labor in the modern world.NOTE: This course is a requirement of the Labor Studies Minor, and does not count towards the 20 additional credits required from courses related to Labor Studies.


HSTAA 105 - The Peoples of the United States

Credits: 5

Department: History of the Americas

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: James Gregory

Description: Surveys American diversity since 1500. Repeopling of America through conquest and immigration by Native Americans, Europeans, Africans, Asians, and Latin Americans. Contributions of various peoples and the conflicts between them, with special attention to changing constructions of race and ethnicity and evolving understandings of what it means to be American.


HSTAA 322 - African-American History, 1865 To The Present

Credits: 5

Department: History of the Americas

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Quintard Taylor

Description: The History of African Americans has been a paradox of incredible triumph in the face of tremendous human tragedy. This course will present a detailed examination of the black experience in the United States from 1890 to the present to provide an understanding of the role African Americans have placed in the history of the American nation and an assessment of why they were, until the recent past, excluded from the promise of American democracy. We will analyze the various political, economic, social, and cultural strategies African Americans have employed to survive in an overwhelmingly hostile environment and assess their prospects as they make the final frontal assault of the structure of racially discriminatory institutions. Is the battle against racism and discrimination over? This course will attempt to answer that question.


HSTCMP 440 /JSIS B 440 - History of Communism

Credits: 5

Department: Modern European History / International Studies

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2015

Instructor: Glennys Young

Description: Communism from its origins in the Bolshevik faction of Russian social democracy to the present, treating the development of the ideology, the various communist parties, and the communist states. Recommended: two history or politics of Europe courses. Offered: jointly with JSIS B 440.


International Studies (JSIS)

  • Area Studies
    (JSIS A)
  • Global/Thematic
    (JSIS B)

JSIS 123/GEOG 123 - Introduction to Globalization

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies / Geography

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Monica Farias

Description: Provides an introduction to the debates over globalization. Focuses on the growth and intensification of global ties. Addresses the resulting inequalities and tensions, as well as the new opportunities for cultural and political exchange. Topics include the impacts on government, finance, labor, culture, the environment, health, and activism.


JSIS A 324/LSJ 322 - Human Rights in Latin America

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Angelina Snodgrass Godoy

Description: Overview of human rights issues and their recent evolution in Latin American history; military dictatorships; contemporary challenges in the region's democracies. Human rights concerns in relation to broader sociopolitical context.


JSIS A 408 / POL S 442 - Government and Politics of China

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies / Political Science

Quarter Offered: Summer 2015, Autumn 2015

Instructor:Susan Whiting, Ketty Loeb

Description: Post-1949 government and politics, with emphasis on problems of political change in modern China.


JSIS A 448 / ANTH 448 - Modern Korean Society

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies / Anthropology

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2015

Instructor: Clark Sorensen

Description: Social organization and values of twentieth-century Korea. Changes in family and kinship, gender relations, rural society, urban life, education, and industrial organization since 1900. Differences between North and South Korea since 1945.


JSIS B 324 - Immigration

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2015

Instructor: Prof. Kathie Friedman

Description: Introduces key theoretical debates in international migration. Examines immigrants' political, economic, religious, and social integration into host societies, and continued ties to homelands. Experiences of voluntary and involuntary immigrants, of the second generation, and of incorporation into America and Europe. Designed around interdisciplinary texts and fieldwork in Seattle.


JSIS B 385 – Industry and the State

Credits: 5

Department:International Studies

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Gary Hamilton

Description: Builds on states and markets approach of 200 and 201 through specific examination of effects of industry and industrial structure on political outcomes and roles of state. Emphasis on late-developing and newly developing economies. Prerequisite: JSIS 200; JSIS 201.


Law, Societies, and Justice (LSJ)

LSJ 322/JSIS A 324 - Human Rights in Latin America

Credits: 5

Department: Law, Societies, and Justice / International Studies

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Angelina Snodgrass Godoy

Description: Overview of human rights issues and their recent evolution in Latin American history; military dictatorships; contemporary challenges in the region's democracies. Human rights concerns in relation to broader sociopolitical context.


LSJ 329 - Immigration, Citizenship, and Rights

Credits: 5

Department: Law, Societies, and Justice

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Prof. Carolyn Pinedo-Turnovsky

Description: In this course, we will examine the relationship between citizenship and migration and the impact on rights, broadly defined, in the U.S. How do experiences intersect with law and policy in daily life in constructing membership as an immigrant and citizen, shaping a sense of belonging, and framing one's experience of rights? This course is a sociological examination of formations of political and social memberships that materialize in legislative form, varied stages in documenting status, and of citizens and migrantsÕ daily experiences in the U.S. Key questions that will be examined throughout the term include: How do states make citizens? How do citizens make states? What does this process look like? What is the consequential impact on social, economic, political and cultural life? Much of our coursework will pay close attention to two major spaces through which citizen[ship] is shaped and contested: identity [race and gender structures] and the social order [labor]. Students are expected to have a basic familiarity with discourses in race, gender and in studies of migration, inequality and globalization.


LSJ 422 - Immigrants, Labor, and Legality

Credits: 5

Department: Law, Societies, and Justice

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2015

Instructor: Carolyn Pinedo-Turnovsky

Description: Provides sociological examination of working immigrants in the United States. Focuses on how immigration and labor legislation shape context of working, worker identity, and rights. Topics include federal and state legislation, employee classification, division of labor, skilled/unskilled, flexibility, legal status, organizing, and relationship to race and gender ideology in shaping contexts of working and rights.


LSJ 490 - Topics in Comparative Legal Institutions: American Labor Studies and the Law

Credits: 5

Department: Law, Societies, and Justice

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Tania Melo

Description: This class will examine the historical development of labor and employment law. It will focus on the reasons for the enactment of new laws, as well as the intended and unintended consequences of laws on workers, labor unions, business, and politics.


LSJ 491 - Special Topics: Business and Human Rights

Credits: 5

Department: Law, Societies, and Justice

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Angelina Godoy

Description: Focused, comparative examination of topics in rights. NOTE: As a topics course, this class will not automatically appear on students' DARS reports for the Labor Studies Minor. To ensure the course is counted, students should contact the Bridges Center at hbcls@u.washington.edu.


Political Science (POL S)

POL S 249/SOC 266/HISTCMP 249 – Introduction to Labor Studies

Credits: 5

Department:Political Science / Sociology / History

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Lawrence Cushnie

Description: Conceptual and theoretical issues in the study of labor and work. Role of labor in national and international politics. Formation of labor movements. Historical and contemporary role of labor in the modern world. NOTE: This course is a requirement of the Labor Studies Minor, and does not count towards the 20 additional credits required from courses related to Labor Studies.



Sociology (SOC)

SOC 266/HISTCMP 249/POL S 249 – Introduction to Labor Studies

Credits: 5

Department: Sociology / History / Political Science

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Lawrence Cushnie

Description: Conceptual and theoretical issues in the study of labor and work. Role of labor in national and international politics. Formation of labor movements. Historical and contemporary role of labor in the modern world. NOTE: This course is a requirement of the Labor Studies Minor, and does not count towards the 20 additional credits required from courses related to Labor Studies.


SOC 360 – Introduction to Social Stratification

Credits: 5

Department: Sociology

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Bettina Sonnenberg

Description: Social class and social inequality in American society. Status, power, authority, and unequal opportunity are examined in depth, using material from other societies to provide a comparative and historical perspective. Sociological origins of recurrent conflicts involving race, sex, poverty, and political ideology.


SOC 401 – Special Topics in Sociology:
Social Mobility and Social Justice

Credits: 5

Department: Sociology

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Bettina Sonnenberg

Description: Selected topics of contemporary interest taught by a sociologist active in the field. Topics vary and may be substantive, theoretical, or methodological.


UW Bothell

No Labor Studies classes currently offered for Autumn 2015 and Winter 2016.


Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences

  • Interdisciplinary Studies
    (BIS)
  • American Studies
    (BIS AMS)

UW Tacoma


Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences

  • Economics (TECON)
  • Ethnic, Gender and Labor Studies (T EGL)
  • History (T HIST)
  • Political Science (TPOL S)
  • Sociology (T SOC)
  • Women Studies (T WOMN)

T EGL 266 - Introduction to Labor Studies

Credits: 5

Department: Ethnic, Gender and Labor Studies (Tacoma)

Quarter Offered: Winter 2015

Instructor: Alex Morrow

Description: Examines the role of labor in the contemporary United States and in the global economy. Explores the nature of work within market economies, forms of worker organizing, and the interaction between race, gender, and class within the workplace.


T HIST 322 – American Labor Since the Civil War

Credits: 5

Department: History (Tacoma)

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2015

Instructor: Michael Honey

Description: Provides a history of workers and labor institutions from the era of industrialization to the post-industrial era, focusing on labor-management conflict, the rise and fall of unions, and on the role of government, the media, and other forces in determining events. Concludes with an assessment of labor today.


T HIST 416 – Life and Thought: Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, and Angela Davis

Credits: 5

Department: History (Tacoma)

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2015

Instructor: Michael Honey

Description: Explores the experiences and thinking of three well-known leaders of African-American protest in the 1960s. Interprets black radicalism in that era and the relationship of these three analysts and activists to their times and to the present.


T HIST 440 – Black Labor in America

Credits: 5

Department: History (Tacoma)

Quarter Offered: Spring 2016

Instructor: Michael Honey

Description: Provides an overview and a detailed consideration of the contributions of the black working class to the making of America. Examines historic racial-economic barriers which have held back development of African-American communities, and the continuing causes and possible solutions to the economic crisis affecting black working people today.


TPOL S 456 – Community and Labor Organizing: A Multicultural Perspective

Credits: 5

Department: Political Science (Tacoma)

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Charles Williams

Description: Explores current community and labor organizing issues through intersections of gender, race, class, and immigration. Discussions of labor movements, community and environmental coalitions, living wage, social justice, and anti-sweatshop campaigns, in context of globalization. Case studies and issues vary.


TPOL S 480 – Politics, Philosophy, and Economics Seminar

Credits: 5

Department: Political Science (Tacoma)

Quarter Offered: Winter 2016

Instructor: Mary Hanneman

Description: Provides in-depth treatment of topics in politics and philosophy; political economy; law and policy; economics and policy and ethics and economics. Emphasizes analysis of methodological issues and developing students' research and writing skills.


A list of Labor Studies minor courses offered since Fall 2009 at the University of Washington, Seattle campus.

To learn whether a class will be offered in the future, please contact the relevant department.

Past Courses - UW Seattle

American Ethnic Studies

Anthropology

Communication

Comparative History of Ideas

Economics

Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences

Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

Geography

History

International Studies

Law, Societies, and Justice

Political Science

Social Work

Sociology

A list of Labor Studies minor courses offered since Fall 2009 at the University of Washington, Tacoma campus.

To learn whether a class will be offerred in the future, please contact the relevant department.

Past Courses - UW Bothell

Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences

A list of Labor Studies minor courses offered since Fall 2009 at the University of Washington, Tacoma campus.

To learn whether a class will be offerred in the future, please contact the relevant department.

Past Courses - UW Tacoma