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Labor Studies Minor



Current Labor Studies Courses

Updated: 5/7/2014

Now available: Full List of Summer and Autumn 2014 Course Offerings

Select a department to view the courses currently offered in 2014-2015 academic year. All courses listed count towards the 20 credits required to complete a Minor in Labor Studies.


UW SEATTLE


UW BOTHELL


UW TACOMA


PAST COURSES



About

The field of Labor Studies encompasses scholarship and teaching about work, workers and their organizations across many disciplines. From unions and organized labor, to the often unpaid caring labor taking place at home, Labor Studies is broadly conceived to include working men and women everywhere.

The Labor Studies minor brings together a series of courses on labor in core social-science departments. It provides students an interdisciplinary program of study focusing on the importance of labor to the economic, social, political, and cultural evolution of modern societies.

Requirements

To complete a Minor in Labor Studies, students must satisfy the following minimum requirements:


  1. HIST 249/POL S 249/SOC 266: Introduction to Labor Studies (5 credits):
    Conceptual and theoretical issues in the study of labor and work. Role of labor in national and international politics. Formation of labor movements. Historical and contemporary role of labor in the modern world.

  2. 20 additional credits from courses related to Labor Studies, with no more than 10 credits from one department. To view a list of courses that qualify, see below.

  3. A minimum 2.0 grade is required for each course applied towards the Labor Studies minor.

To apply for a minor, students must have completed at least 90 college credits. Students may declare a minor through a departmental advisor or at the time that they file a graduation application.

Advising

NOTE: Some courses, such as Special Topics, will not appear on students' DARS reports. To ensure the course is counted, or to request that a course not listed on this website be counted towards the Labor Studies Minor, or for general information about the Minor, contact the Labor Studies Minor Adviser at the Bridges Center at 206-543-7946, or hbcls@u.washington.edu.

Recommended

In addition to HIST 249/POL S 249/SOC 266: Introduction to Labor Studies, the following courses are recommended but not required to complete the Labor Studies Minor:

  • HSTAA 353: Class, Labor, and American Capitalism (5 credits):
    The history of workers and class formation from early industrialization to the present. Emphasizes the interaction of class with race, ethnicity, gender, and political culture within the context of American economic development. Explores the role of unions, labor politics, and radical movements.






Labor Studies Minor - 2013-2014 Courses

UW Seattle


American
Ethnic Studies
(AES)

  • Asian-American Studies (AAS)
  • Chicano Studies (CHSTU)

AAS 101 - Introduction to Asian American Cultures

Credits: 5

Department: Asian-American Studies

Quarter Offered: Summer 2014

Instructor: Connie So

Description: Introductory history of Asian Indians, Chinese, Filipinos, Japanese and Koreans in the United States from the 1840s to the 1960s. Major themes include imperialism, labor migration, racism, community formation, and resistance. Explores the particular experiences of Asian Americans within regional, national, and global contexts. Central questions addressed throughout the course are: What forces have driven Asians to migrate to the United States? How have Asians figured in U.S. race relations? What factors have unified and stratified Asian American communities? How have Asian Americans struggled for democracy and justice? The course will conclude by examining the growing diversity of Asian Americans since the 1960s.


AAS 206 - Contemporary Problems of Asian Americans

Credits: 5

Department: Asian-American Studies

Quarter Offered: Summer 2014

Instructor: Connie So

Description: Recent Asian and Pacific Islander American issues, from the 1960s to the present. Topics include post-1960s immigration, ethnic enclaves, civil rights, racial and ethnic stereotypes, identity politics, social organizations, community building and political movements.


AES 322/GWSS 300 – Gender, Race, and Class in Social Stratification

Credits: 5

Department: American Ethnic Studies / Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

Quarter Offered: Summer 2014

Instructor: Noralis Rodriguez

Description: The intersection of race and gender in the lives of women of color in the United States from historical and contemporary perspectives. Topics include racism, sexism, activism, sexuality, and inter-racial dynamics between women of color groups.


CHSTU 200 - Latinos in the United States

Credits: 5

Department: Chicano Studies

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Erasmo Gamboa

Description: Historical, social, and economic experience of Latinos in the United States. Major themes include education, labor, class, and gender identity. Analyzes rapid growth of old and newly established Latino communities, based on emigration from Latin America.


CHSTU 254 - Northwest Latinos: History, Community, Culture

Credits: 5

Department: Chicano Studies

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Erasmo Gamboa

Description: Traces the history, extent, and development of the Chicano/Latino presence from the early Spanish period to the present. Examines the major contemporary political, social, and economic issues affecting Northwest Chicano/Latinos in a broader national and international context.


CHSTU 260 - Introduction to Chicano Politics

Credits: 5

Department: Chicano Studies

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Elizabeth Salas

Description: Surveys the political position and activities of Mexican-American peoples in the United States from two perspectives: (1) Chicanos as objects of the political process of U.S. life, (2) contributions of the Chicano people to U.S. politics.


Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 448/JSIS A 448 - Modern Korean Society

Credits: 5

Department: Anthropology / International Studies

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Clark Sorensen

Description: Social organization and values of twentieth-century Korea. Changes in family and kinship, gender relations, rural society, urban life, education, and industrial organization since 1900. Differences between North and South Korea since 1945.


ANTH 488 - Agroecology

Credits: 5

Department: Anthropology

Quarter Offered: Summer 2014

Instructor: Devon G. Pena

Description: Cross-cultural survey of agroecological research methods, theoretical problems, policy issues, and ethical debates. Local knowledge and ethnoscientific bases of alternative agriculture. Comparative political ecology of agroecosystems with a focus on indicators of social equity and ecological sustainability.


Economics (ECON)

ECON 443 - Labor Market Analysis

Credits: 5

Department: Economics

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Prof. Elaina Rose

Description: Determinants of employment and incomes in the United States: analysis of individual and firm decisions and of equilibrium in the labor market. Topics include decisions to work and retire, education and occupation choices, compensation, discrimination, poverty, unemployment and unions. Examination of policy issues affecting the labor market. Prerequisite: 2.0 in ECON 300.


Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences (ENV H)

ENV H 453 – Industrial Hygiene

Credits: 3

Department: Environmental Health

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Noah Seixas

Description: Introduction to the principles and scientific foundation of industrial hygiene. Examines the anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and control of work place hazards to health and safety. Focuses on the first three functions, but includes some consideration of control methods.


ENV H 564/IND E 564 – Recognition of Health and Safety Problems in Industry

Credits: 2

Department: Environmental Health / Industrial Engineering

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Noah Seixas

Description: Develops skills in occupational health and safety hazard recognition in a variety of important northwest industries. Focuses on process understanding and hazard recognition skills during walk-through inspections of several local facilities, stressing a multidisciplinary approach.


Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies (GWSS)

GWSS 300/AES 322 – Gender, Race, and Class in Social Stratification

Credits: 5

Department: Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies / American Ethnic Studies

Quarter Offered: Summer 2014

Instructor: Noralis Rodriguez

Description: The intersection of race and gender in the lives of women of color in the United States from historical and contemporary perspectives. Topics include racism, sexism, activism, sexuality, and inter-racial dynamics between women of color groups.


GWSS 385 – Women and Activism in the U.S., 1820-1990s

Credits: 5

Department: Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

Quarter Offered: Summer 2014

Instructor: Kathleen Boyd

Description: Analyzes how U.S. social reform movements between the 1820s and the 1990s shaped discourses of gender, race, class, nation, and citizenship. Social movements include temperance, anti-prostitution, prision reform, dress reform, reproductive rights, eugenics, suffrage/anti-suffrage, abolitionism, labor, the "mothers' movement," civil rights, QBLTQ movement and dis/abilities, and evangelicalism.


Geography (GEOG)

GEOG 123/JSIS 123 - Introduction to Globalization

Credits: 5

Department: Geography / International Studies

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Joe Hannah

Description: Provides an introduction to the debates over globalization. Focuses on the growth and intensification of global ties. Addresses the resulting inequalities and tensions, as well as the new opportunities for cultural and political exchange. Topics include the impacts on government, finance, labor, culture, the environment, health, and activism.


GEOG 230 - Urbanization and Development: Geographies of Global Inequality

Credits: 5

Department: Geography

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Michelle Daigle

Description: Examines the processes driving urban growth in Asia, Africa and Latin America. The course examines urbanization in its international context. These issues and their human impacts are discussed in the context of historical and contemporary changes in the international political-economy. The course begins by reexamining some of the defining debates in development studies; population, migration/immigration dynamics, 'overurbanization', protectionism and free trade. The course culminates with a discussion of the human dimensions of broad political-economic processes examining questions of urban employment, shelter and political action. Major themes include: the cultural context of urban growth, the rapid pace of urbanization, indigenous urban forms, and colonial legacies.


History (HIST)

  • History of the Americas
    (HSTAA)
  • History of Asia (HSTAS)
  • Modern European History (HSTEU)

HIST 249/POL S 249/SOC 266 – Introduction to Labor Studies

Credits: 5

Department: History / Political Science / Sociology

Quarter Offered: Winter 2015

Description: Conceptual and theoretical issues in the study of labor and work. Role of labor in national and international politics. Formation of labor movements. Historical and contemporary role of labor in the modern world.NOTE: This course is a requirement of the Labor Studies Minor, and does not count towards the 20 additional credits required from courses related to Labor Studies.


HSTAA 185 - Introduction to Latin American History: From Columbus to Castro

Credits: 5

Department: History of the Americas

Quarter Offered: Summer 2014

Instructor: Ileana M. Rodriguez Silva

Description: The multiple regions and peoples comprised under the rubric of "Latin America" or the "Caribbean" are too vast and complex to cover in any survey course. Facing this insurmountable task, we can only aspire to gain an overview of significant historical processes that have marked the individuals and communities inhabiting and passing through these varied landscapes. The first and longest unit focuses on the workings and reproduuction of colonial society. We will uncover how Portuguese and Spanish imperial agents sought to economically exploit and morally/culturally shape the lives of native communities, African slaves, colonizers of various backgrounds, and their racially mixed offspring. By the same token, we will pay special attention to the myriad of ways in which peoples challenged, subverted, or simply negotiated in their everyday life the regimes of rule imposed upon them. In the remaining units, we will focus on the tribulations of building modern nation-states out of colonized territories. Like colonial subjugation, the "nation" was another fiction to organize power and has led to continuous struggles - often, violent ones - about the terms of inclusion and exclusion. The serach for the "modern," later the need for "development," and recently the call for free trade in a global market have legitimized the continued subjugation of large sectors of the Indigneous, black, and female populations and have unleashed severe social upheavals. These conflicts remain at the heart of present-day social movements in these regions.


HSTEU 440 /JSIS B 440 - History of Communism

Credits: 5

Department: Modern European History / International Studies

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Glennys Young

Description: Communism from its origins in the Bolshevik faction of Russian social democracy to the present, treating the development of the ideology, the various communist parties, and the communist states. Recommended: two history or politics of Europe courses. Offered: jointly with JSIS B 440.


International Studies (JSIS)

  • Area Studies
    (JSIS A)
  • Global/Thematic
    (JSIS B)

JSIS 123/GEOG 123 - Introduction to Globalization

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies / Geography

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Joe Hannah

Description: Provides an introduction to the debates over globalization. Focuses on the growth and intensification of global ties. Addresses the resulting inequalities and tensions, as well as the new opportunities for cultural and political exchange. Topics include the impacts on government, finance, labor, culture, the environment, health, and activism.


JSIS A 408 / POL S 442 - Government and Politics of China

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies / Political Science

Quarter Offered: Summer 2014, Autumn 2014

Instructor: Ketty Loeb

Description: Post-1949 government and politics, with emphasis on problems of political change in modern China.


JSIS B 440 / HSTEU 440 - History of Communism

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies / Modern European History

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Glennys Young

Description: Communism from its origins in the Bolshevik faction of Russian social democracy to the present, treating the development of the ideology, the various communist parties, and the communist states. Recommended: two history or politics of Europe courses. Offered: jointly with JSIS B 440.


JSIS A 448 / ANTH 448 - Modern Korean Society

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies / Anthropology

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Clark Sorensen

Description: Social organization and values of twentieth-century Korea. Changes in family and kinship, gender relations, rural society, urban life, education, and industrial organization since 1900. Differences between North and South Korea since 1945.


JSIS B 324 - Immigration

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Prof. Kathie Friedman

Description: Introduces key theoretical debates in international migration. Examines immigrants' political, economic, religious, and social integration into host societies, and continued ties to homelands. Experiences of voluntary and involuntary immigrants, of the second generation, and of incorporation into America and Europe. Designed around interdisciplinary texts and fieldwork in Seattle.


Law, Societies, and Justice (LSJ)

LSJ 360 / POL S 360 - Introduction to United States Constitutional Law

Credits: 5

Department:Law, Societies and Justice / Political Science

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Description: This course on American constitutionalism examines the foundations of the United States political system. It looks at some of the political and legal processes that have shaped constitutional development from the founding to the present. The course focuses on issues related to the two most important features of the American constitutional system: seperation of powers and federalism. Particular attention is paid to the way constitutional development has been shaped by efforts to regulate economic activity. The course considers the political context in which the Supreme Court makes constitutional law and the effect of Supreme Court power on democratic processes and electoral accountability. The course also covers some basics of Supreme Court process.


LSJ 491 - Special Topics in Rights: Working Immigrants: Legality and Rights

Credits: 5

Department: Law, Societies, and Justice

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Carolyn Pinedo-Turnovsky

Description: How do we define work? How do we define a worker? And what rights can a worker claim? This class will look at the relationship between work, legality and rights. Specifically, our readings and discussions will examine the work experiences of immigrants in the US.

In brief, we will consider specific case studies to examine the following: What is the relationship between migrant status and the kind of work one does? What does the context of the work/labor look like? Type of workers, codes of conduct, workplace practices, laws (labor, criminal and immigration). What is the relationship between location and the work that is done? How do all of the above shape or impact workers' access to their rights?


Political Science (POL S)

POL S 249/SOC 266/HIST 249 – Introduction to Labor Studies

Credits: 5

Department:Political Science / Sociology / History

Quarter Offered: Winter 2015

Description: Conceptual and theoretical issues in the study of labor and work. Role of labor in national and international politics. Formation of labor movements. Historical and contemporary role of labor in the modern world. NOTE: This course is a requirement of the Labor Studies Minor, and does not count towards the 20 additional credits required from courses related to Labor Studies.


POL S 360 / LSJ 360 - Introduction to United States Constitutional Law

Credits: 5

Department:Political Science / Law, Societies and Justice

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Description: This course on American constitutionalism examines the foundations of the United States political system. It looks at some of the political and legal processes that have shaped constitutional development from the founding to the present. The course focuses on issues related to the two most important features of the American constitutional system: seperation of powers and federalism. Particular attention is paid to the way constitutional development has been shaped by efforts to regulate economic activity. The course considers the political context in which the Supreme Court makes constitutional law and the effect of Supreme Court power on democratic processes and electoral accountability. The course also covers some basics of Supreme Court process.


POL S 442 / JSIS A 408 - Government and Politics of China

Credits: 5

Department:Political Science / International Studies

Quarter Offered: Summer 2014, Autumn 2014

Instructor: Ketty Loeb

Description: Post-1949 government and politics, with emphasis on problems of political change in modern China.


Sociology (SOC)

SOC 266/HIST 249/POL S 249 – Introduction to Labor Studies

Credits: 5

Department: Sociology / History / Political Science

Quarter Offered: Winter 2015

Description: Conceptual and theoretical issues in the study of labor and work. Role of labor in national and international politics. Formation of labor movements. Historical and contemporary role of labor in the modern world. NOTE: This course is a requirement of the Labor Studies Minor, and does not count towards the 20 additional credits required from courses related to Labor Studies.


SOC 360 – Introduction to Social Stratification

Credits: 5

Department: Sociology

Quarter Offered: Summer 2014, Autumn 2014

Instructor: Mark Wine, Jake Rosenfeld

Description: Social class and social inequality in American society. Status, power, authority, and unequal opportunity are examined in depth, using material from other societies to provide a comparative and historical perspective. Sociological origins of recurrent conflicts involving race, sex, poverty, and political ideology.


UW Bothell


Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences

  • Interdisciplinary Studies
    (BIS)
  • American Studies
    (BIS AMS)

BIS 327 - History of U.S. Labor Institutions

Credits: 5

Department: Interdisciplinary Studies, UW Bothell

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Trevor Griffey

Description: Examines the evolution of the institutions that have shaped labor. Discusses indentured servitude, slavery, apprenticeship, schooling, wage labor, unions, and the laws that surround each of these institutions.


BIS 425 - Topics in U.S. Social and Political History: Contemporary Labor Movements

Credits: 5

Department: Interdisciplinary Studies, UW Bothell

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Trevor Griffey

Description: Intensive examination of a particular topic on American institutions, ideologies, movements, and social conditions. NOTE: As a topics course, this class will not automatically appear on students' DARS reports for the Labor Studies Minor. To ensure the course is counted, students should contact the Bridges Center at hbcls@u.washington.edu.


BIS 445 - Meanings and Realities of Inequality

Credits: 5

Department: Interdisciplinary Studies, UW Bothell

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Caroline Lanza

Description: A socioeconomic investigation into the meanings and realities of inequality using a variety of theoretical frameworks and empirical research. Focuses on the determinants of economic mobility and social status. Addresses discrimination, poverty, welfare, and education.


BISAMS 305 - Power, Dissent, and American Culture

Credits: 5

Department: Interdisciplinary Studies, UW Bothell

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Camille Walsh and Amparo Padilla

Description: Focuses on the relationships between power, inequality, resistance, and difference in the United States. Examines the concept of America through intersecting categories of race, gender, sexuality, class, place, citizenship, slavery, nationalism, empire, immigration, and social change. Uses diverse sources to study culture, politics, and history.


UW Tacoma


Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences

  • Economics (TECON)
  • History (T HIST)
  • Political Science (TPOL S)
  • Sociology (T SOC)
  • Women Studies (T WOMN)

TECON 450 – Labor Economics and Policy

Credits: 5

Department: Arts (Tacoma)

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: To be announced

Description: Analyzes of determinants of labor markets outcomes, and the effect of labor market policy in advanced capitalist economies, with primary reference to the United States.


T HIST 441 – Black Freedom Movement in Perspective

Credits: 5

Department: History (Tacoma)

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Luther Adams

Description: Explores the historical roots and present-day manifestations of movements against racial oppression and for empowerment in the African-American community, focusing heavily on the period since the 1950s.


TPOL S 311 – International Human Rights

Credits: 5

Department: Political Science (Tacoma)

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Prof. Michael Forman

Description: Team-oriented research of the historical origins, theories, basic documents, personalities, institutions, and legal and political processes which have promoted international human rights as a widely accepted legal and moral foundation for a just world order.


T SOC 335 – Social Class and Inequality

Credits: 5

Department: Sociology (Tacoma)

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Anthony Falit-Baiamonte

Description: Examines the problem of persistent urban poverty in the United States. Explores the differential risk of poverty experienced by racial and ethnic groups and by women and children in the context of the major theories of class stratification. Also discusses the factors that lead to extreme-poverty neighborhoods, how these environments affect the life chances of residents, survival strategies of the poor, and public policy implications.


T WOMN 420 - Women in the Global Economy

Credits: 5

Department: Women Studies (Tacoma)

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Cynthia Howson

Description: Explores impact of "modernization" and "development" on status and roles of women in selected Western and non-Western societies. Critical analysis of assumptions about women's responses to social change which have guided research, development planning. Examines cultural practices, economic arrangements, government policies to understand opportunities and obstacles confronting women in developing countries today.


A list of Labor Studies minor courses offered since Fall 2009 at the University of Washington, Seattle campus.

To learn whether a class will be offered in the future, please contact the relevant department.

Past Courses - UW Seattle

American Ethnic Studies

Anthropology

Communication

Comparative History of Ideas

Economics

Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences

Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

Geography

History

International Studies

Law, Societies, and Justice

Political Science

Social Work

Sociology

A list of Labor Studies minor courses offered since Fall 2009 at the University of Washington, Tacoma campus.

To learn whether a class will be offerred in the future, please contact the relevant department.

Past Courses - UW Bothell

Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences

A list of Labor Studies minor courses offered since Fall 2009 at the University of Washington, Tacoma campus.

To learn whether a class will be offerred in the future, please contact the relevant department.

Past Courses - UW Tacoma