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Labor Studies Minor



Current Labor Studies Courses

Updated: 10/29/2014

Now available: Full List of Winter 2015 Course Offerings

Select a department to view the courses currently offered in 2014-2015 academic year. All courses listed count towards the 20 credits required to complete a Minor in Labor Studies.


UW SEATTLE


UW BOTHELL


UW TACOMA


PAST COURSES



About

The field of Labor Studies encompasses scholarship and teaching about work, workers and their organizations across many disciplines. From unions and organized labor, to the often unpaid caring labor taking place at home, Labor Studies is broadly conceived to include working men and women everywhere.

The Labor Studies minor brings together a series of courses on labor in core social-science departments. It provides students an interdisciplinary program of study focusing on the importance of labor to the economic, social, political, and cultural evolution of modern societies.

Requirements

To complete a Minor in Labor Studies, students must satisfy the following minimum requirements:


  1. HIST 249/POL S 249/SOC 266: Introduction to Labor Studies (5 credits):
    Conceptual and theoretical issues in the study of labor and work. Role of labor in national and international politics. Formation of labor movements. Historical and contemporary role of labor in the modern world.

  2. 20 additional credits from courses related to Labor Studies, with no more than 10 credits from one department. To view a list of courses that qualify, see below.

  3. A minimum 2.0 grade is required for each course applied towards the Labor Studies minor.

To apply for a minor, students must have completed at least 90 college credits. Students may declare a minor through a departmental advisor or at the time that they file a graduation application.

Advising

NOTE: Some courses, such as Special Topics, will not appear on students' DARS reports. To ensure the course is counted, or to request that a course not listed on this website be counted towards the Labor Studies Minor, or for general information about the Minor, contact the Labor Studies Minor Adviser at the Bridges Center at 206-543-7946, or hbcls@u.washington.edu.

Recommended

In addition to HIST 249/POL S 249/SOC 266: Introduction to Labor Studies, the following courses are recommended but not required to complete the Labor Studies Minor:

  • HSTAA 353: Class, Labor, and American Capitalism (5 credits):
    The history of workers and class formation from early industrialization to the present. Emphasizes the interaction of class with race, ethnicity, gender, and political culture within the context of American economic development. Explores the role of unions, labor politics, and radical movements.






Labor Studies Minor - 2014-2015 Courses

UW Seattle


American
Ethnic Studies
(AES)

  • Asian-American Studies (AAS)
  • Chicano Studies (CHSTU)

AAS 206 - Contemporary Problems of Asian Americans

Credits: 5

Department: Asian-American Studies

Quarter Offered: Summer 2014, Winter 2015

Instructor: Connie So

Description: Recent Asian and Pacific Islander American issues, from the 1960s to the present. Topics include post-1960s immigration, ethnic enclaves, civil rights, racial and ethnic stereotypes, identity politics, social organizations, community building and political movements.


AAS 350 - Chinese American History and Culture

Credits: 5

Department: Asian-American Studies

Quarter Offered: Winter 2015

Instructor: Connie So

Description: Explores the differences and similarities of race, class, gender, sexuality, and generation influence on the life experiences of the Chinese (among the most diasporic people in the world) in America


CHSTU 200 - Latinos in the United States

Credits: 5

Department: Chicano Studies

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Erasmo Gamboa

Description: Historical, social, and economic experience of Latinos in the United States. Major themes include education, labor, class, and gender identity. Analyzes rapid growth of old and newly established Latino communities, based on emigration from Latin America.


CHSTU 254 - Northwest Latinos: History, Community, Culture

Credits: 5

Department: Chicano Studies

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Erasmo Gamboa

Description: Traces the history, extent, and development of the Chicano/Latino presence from the early Spanish period to the present. Examines the major contemporary political, social, and economic issues affecting Northwest Chicano/Latinos in a broader national and international context.


CHSTU 260 - Introduction to Chicano Politics

Credits: 5

Department: Chicano Studies

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014, Winter 2015

Instructor: Elizabeth Salas

Description: Surveys the political position and activities of Mexican-American peoples in the United States from two perspectives: (1) Chicanos as objects of the political process of U.S. life, (2) contributions of the Chicano people to U.S. politics.


Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 345/GWSS 345/JSIS B 345 – Women and International Economic Development

Credits: 5

Department: Anthropology / Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies / International Studies

Quarter Offered: Winter 2015

Instructor: Prof. Priti Ramamurthy

Description: Questions how women are affected by economic development in Third World and celebrates redefinitions of what development means. Theoretical perspectives and methods to interrogate gender and development policies introduced. Current processes of globalization and potential for changing gender and economic inequalities assessed.


ANTH 448/JSIS A 448 - Modern Korean Society

Credits: 5

Department: Anthropology / International Studies

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Clark Sorensen

Description: Social organization and values of twentieth-century Korea. Changes in family and kinship, gender relations, rural society, urban life, education, and industrial organization since 1900. Differences between North and South Korea since 1945.


Economics (ECON)

ECON 443 - Labor Market Analysis

Credits: 5

Department: Economics

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014, Winter 2015

Instructor: Prof. Elaina Rose

Description: Determinants of employment and incomes in the United States: analysis of individual and firm decisions and of equilibrium in the labor market. Topics include decisions to work and retire, education and occupation choices, compensation, discrimination, poverty, unemployment and unions. Examination of policy issues affecting the labor market. Prerequisite: 2.0 in ECON 300.


Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences (ENV H)

ENV H 453 – Industrial Hygiene

Credits: 3

Department: Environmental Health

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Noah Seixas

Description: Introduction to the principles and scientific foundation of industrial hygiene. Examines the anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and control of work place hazards to health and safety. Focuses on the first three functions, but includes some consideration of control methods.


ENV H 462 – Technical Aspects of Occupational Safety

Credits: 3

Department: Environmental Health

Quarter Offered: Winter 2015

Instructor: Richard Gleason

Description: Reviews federal OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) and state WISHA (Washington Industrial Safety and Heath Act) standards. Explores the impact of these regulations on industry, particularly construction. Upon completion of the course, students receive an OSHA 510 30-hour Construction Safety and Health certification.


ENV H 564/IND E 564 – Recognition of Health and Safety Problems in Industry

Credits: 2

Department: Environmental Health / Industrial Engineering

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Noah Seixas

Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies (GWSS)

GWSS 345/ANTH 345/JSIS B 345 – Women and International Economic Development

Credits: 5

Department: Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies / Anthropology / International Studies

Quarter Offered: Winter 2015

Instructor: Prof. Priti Ramamurthy

Description: Questions how women are affected by economic development in Third World and celebrates redefinitions of what development means. Theoretical perspectives and methods to interrogate gender and development policies introduced. Current processes of globalization and potential for changing gender and economic inequalities assessed.


Geography (GEOG)

GEOG 123/JSIS 123 - Introduction to Globalization

Credits: 5

Department: Geography / International Studies

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014, Winter 2015

Instructor: William Buckingham, Monica Farias

Description: Provides an introduction to the debates over globalization. Focuses on the growth and intensification of global ties. Addresses the resulting inequalities and tensions, as well as the new opportunities for cultural and political exchange. Topics include the impacts on government, finance, labor, culture, the environment, health, and activism.


GEOG 230 - Urbanization and Development: Geographies of Global Inequality

Credits: 5

Department: Geography

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Michelle Daigle

Description: Examines the processes driving urban growth in Asia, Africa and Latin America. The course examines urbanization in its international context. These issues and their human impacts are discussed in the context of historical and contemporary changes in the international political-economy. The course begins by reexamining some of the defining debates in development studies; population, migration/immigration dynamics, 'overurbanization', protectionism and free trade. The course culminates with a discussion of the human dimensions of broad political-economic processes examining questions of urban employment, shelter and political action. Major themes include: the cultural context of urban growth, the rapid pace of urbanization, indigenous urban forms, and colonial legacies.


GEOG 271 - Geography of Food and Eating

Credits: 5

Department: Geography

Quarter Offered: Winter 2015

Instructor: Lucy Jarosz

Description: Examines food production, distribution, and consumption issues across geographic scales. Focus ranges from the microcosm of the individual body to food and eating at national and global scales. Explores the political, social, cultural, and economic dimensions of food and eating in particular spaces, places, environments, contexts, and regions.


GEOG 331 - Global Poverty and Care

Credits: 5

Department: Geography

Quarter Offered: Winter 2015

Instructor: Victoria A. Lawson

Description: Explores the causes and patterns of global poverty, and the urgent need for studies of care in both academic work and public policy. Considers the possibilities and challenges of caring across distance, and ways to respectfully engage with people in different places.


History (HIST)

  • History of the Americas
    (HSTAA)
  • History of Asia (HSTAS)
  • Modern European History (HSTEU)

HIST 249/POL S 249/SOC 266 – Introduction to Labor Studies

Credits: 5

Department: History / Political Science / Sociology

Quarter Offered: Winter 2015

Instructor: Trevor Griffey

Description: Conceptual and theoretical issues in the study of labor and work. Role of labor in national and international politics. Formation of labor movements. Historical and contemporary role of labor in the modern world.NOTE: This course is a requirement of the Labor Studies Minor, and does not count towards the 20 additional credits required from courses related to Labor Studies.


HSTAA 105 - The Peoples of the United States

Credits: 5

Department: History of the Americas

Quarter Offered: Winter 2015

Instructor: Prof. James Gregory

Description: Surveys American diversity since 1500. Repeopling of America through conquest and immigration by Native Americans, Europeans, Africans, Asians, and Latin Americans. Contributions of various peoples and the conflicts between them, with special attention to changing constructions of race and ethnicity and evolving understandings of what it means to be American.


HSTEU 440 /JSIS B 440 - History of Communism

Credits: 5

Department: Modern European History / International Studies

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Glennys Young

Description: Communism from its origins in the Bolshevik faction of Russian social democracy to the present, treating the development of the ideology, the various communist parties, and the communist states. Recommended: two history or politics of Europe courses. Offered: jointly with JSIS B 440.


International Studies (JSIS)

  • Area Studies
    (JSIS A)
  • Global/Thematic
    (JSIS B)

JSIS 123/GEOG 123 - Introduction to Globalization

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies / Geography

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor:

JSIS A 324/LSJ 322 - Human Rights in Latin America

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies

Quarter Offered: Winter 2015

Instructor: Angelina Snodgrass Godoy

Description: Overview of human rights issues and their recent evolution in Latin American history; military dictatorships; contemporary challenges in the region's democracies. Human rights concerns in relation to broader sociopolitical context.


JSIS A 408 / POL S 442 - Government and Politics of China

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies / Political Science

Quarter Offered: Summer 2014, Autumn 2014

Instructor:

JSIS B 324 - Immigration

Credits: 5

Department: International Studies

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Prof. Kathie Friedman

Description: Introduces key theoretical debates in international migration. Examines immigrants' political, economic, religious, and social integration into host societies, and continued ties to homelands. Experiences of voluntary and involuntary immigrants, of the second generation, and of incorporation into America and Europe. Designed around interdisciplinary texts and fieldwork in Seattle.


JSIS B 345/ANTH 345/GWSS 345 – Women and International Economic Development

Credits: 5

Department:International Studies / Anthropology / Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

Quarter Offered: Winter 2015

Instructor: Prof. Priti Ramamurthy

Description: Questions how women are affected by economic development in Third World and celebrates redefinitions of what development means. Theoretical perspectives and methods to interrogate gender and development policies introduced. Current processes of globalization and potential for changing gender and economic inequalities assessed.


Law, Societies, and Justice (LSJ)

LSJ 322/JSIS A 324 - Human Rights in Latin America

Credits: 5

Department: Law, Societies, and Justice / International Studies

Quarter Offered: Winter 2015

Instructor: Angelina Snodgrass Godoy

Description: Overview of human rights issues and their recent evolution in Latin American history; military dictatorships; contemporary challenges in the region's democracies. Human rights concerns in relation to broader sociopolitical context.


LSJ 329 - Immigration, Citizenship, and Rights

Credits: 5

Department: Law, Societies, and Justice

Quarter Offered: Winter 2015

Instructor: Prof. Carolyn Pinedo-Turnovsky

Description: In this course, we will examine the relationship between citizenship and migration and the impact on rights, broadly defined, in the U.S. How do experiences intersect with law and policy in daily life in constructing membership as an immigrant and citizen, shaping a sense of belonging, and framing one's experience of rights? This course is a sociological examination of formations of political and social memberships that materialize in legislative form, varied stages in documenting status, and of citizens and migrantsÕ daily experiences in the U.S. Key questions that will be examined throughout the term include: How do states make citizens? How do citizens make states? What does this process look like? What is the consequential impact on social, economic, political and cultural life? Much of our coursework will pay close attention to two major spaces through which citizen[ship] is shaped and contested: identity [race and gender structures] and the social order [labor]. Students are expected to have a basic familiarity with discourses in race, gender and in studies of migration, inequality and globalization.


LSJ 360 / POL S 360 - Introduction to United States Constitutional Law

Credits: 5

Department:Law, Societies and Justice / Political Science

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

LSJ 491 - Special Topics in Rights: Working Immigrants: Legality and Rights

Credits: 5

Department: Law, Societies, and Justice

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Carolyn Pinedo-Turnovsky

Description: How do we define work? How do we define a worker? And what rights can a worker claim? This class will look at the relationship between work, legality and rights. Specifically, our readings and discussions will examine the work experiences of immigrants in the US.

In brief, we will consider specific case studies to examine the following: What is the relationship between migrant status and the kind of work one does? What does the context of the work/labor look like? Type of workers, codes of conduct, workplace practices, laws (labor, criminal and immigration). What is the relationship between location and the work that is done? How do all of the above shape or impact workers' access to their rights?


Political Science (POL S)

POL S 249/SOC 266/HIST 249 – Introduction to Labor Studies

Credits: 5

Department:Political Science / Sociology / History

Quarter Offered: Winter 2015

Description: Conceptual and theoretical issues in the study of labor and work. Role of labor in national and international politics. Formation of labor movements. Historical and contemporary role of labor in the modern world. NOTE: This course is a requirement of the Labor Studies Minor, and does not count towards the 20 additional credits required from courses related to Labor Studies.


POL S 360 / LSJ 360 - Introduction to United States Constitutional Law

Credits: 5

Department:Political Science / Law, Societies and Justice

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Description: Conceptual and theoretical issues in the study of labor and work. Role of labor in national and international politics. Formation of labor movements. Historical and contemporary role of labor in the modern world. NOTE: This course is a requirement of the Labor Studies Minor, and does not count towards the 20 additional credits required from courses related to Labor Studies.


SOC 360 – Introduction to Social Stratification

Credits: 5

Department: Sociology

Quarter Offered: Summer 2014, Autumn 2014

Instructor: Mark Wine, Jake Rosenfeld

Description: Social class and social inequality in American society. Status, power, authority, and unequal opportunity are examined in depth, using material from other societies to provide a comparative and historical perspective. Sociological origins of recurrent conflicts involving race, sex, poverty, and political ideology.


SOC 401 – Special Topics in Sociology:
New Inequality: Recent Trends in the U.S. and Other Advanced Industrialized Nations

Credits: 5

Department: Sociology

Quarter Offered: Winter 2015

Instructor: Jake Rosenfeld

Description: In the United States, unionization rates have fallen by 50% during the last few decades, a period also marked by severe increases in earnings’ inequality. Despite facing similar global economic pressures, near-universal unionization remains the norm in much of Scandinavia, where wage dispersion is comparatively low. Labor movements in other nations have suffered recently, although not to the extent of unions in the U.S. What accounts for such divergent outcomes? And what can the contemporary state of organized labor tell us about inequality and macroeconomic performance in the modern age? This course serves as a primer to the contemporary labor movement in the advanced democracies. We begin by exploring the causes and consequences of labor’s collapse in the U.S. Next, we compare the U.S. case to other countries, paying particular attention to heterogeneity among the non-U.S. cases. We end by exploring proposed strategies for labor revitalization in the U.S., drawing on other nations’ experiences as potential guideposts. This is not a course solely focused on unions and their members. Throughout the quarter, we will examine broader trends in macroeconomic performance and their interrelationships with the labor movement. One should leave the class with a sound understanding of how particular configurations of organized labor affect and are in turn influenced by the wider economy.


UW Bothell


Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences

  • Interdisciplinary Studies
    (BIS)
  • American Studies
    (BIS AMS)

BIS 327 - History of U.S. Labor Institutions

Credits: 5

Department: Interdisciplinary Studies, UW Bothell

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Trevor Griffey

BIS 425 - Topics in U.S. Social and Political History: Contemporary Labor Movements

Credits: 5

Department: Interdisciplinary Studies, UW Bothell

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Trevor Griffey

Description: Intensive examination of a particular topic on American institutions, ideologies, movements, and social conditions. NOTE: As a topics course, this class will not automatically appear on students' DARS reports for the Labor Studies Minor. To ensure the course is counted, students should contact the Bridges Center at hbcls@u.washington.edu.


BIS 445 - Meanings and Realities of Inequality

Credits: 5

Department: Interdisciplinary Studies, UW Bothell

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014, Winter 2015

Instructor: Kari Lerum

Description: A socioeconomic investigation into the meanings and realities of inequality using a variety of theoretical frameworks and empirical research. Focuses on the determinants of economic mobility and social status. Addresses discrimination, poverty, welfare, and education.


BISAMS 305 - Power, Dissent, and American Culture

Credits: 5

Department: Interdisciplinary Studies, UW Bothell

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Camille Walsh and Amparo Padilla

Description: Focuses on the relationships between power, inequality, resistance, and difference in the United States. Examines the concept of America through intersecting categories of race, gender, sexuality, class, place, citizenship, slavery, nationalism, empire, immigration, and social change. Uses diverse sources to study culture, politics, and history.


UW Tacoma


Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences

  • Economics (TECON)
  • History (T HIST)
  • Political Science (TPOL S)
  • Sociology (T SOC)
  • Women Studies (T WOMN)

TECON 450 – Labor Economics and Policy

Credits: 5

Department: Arts (Tacoma)

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: To be announced

Description: Analyzes of determinants of labor markets outcomes, and the effect of labor market policy in advanced capitalist economies, with primary reference to the United States.


T HIST 441 – Black Freedom Movement in Perspective

Credits: 5

Department: History (Tacoma)

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Luther Adams

Description: Explores the historical roots and present-day manifestations of movements against racial oppression and for empowerment in the African-American community, focusing heavily on the period since the 1950s.


TPOL S 311 – International Human Rights

Credits: 5

Department: Political Science (Tacoma)

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014, Winter 2015

Instructor: Elizabeth Bruch

Description: Team-oriented research of the historical origins, theories, basic documents, personalities, institutions, and legal and political processes which have promoted international human rights as a widely accepted legal and moral foundation for a just world order.


T SOC 335 – Social Class and Inequality

Credits: 5

Department: Sociology (Tacoma)

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor:

T WOMN 420 - Women in the Global Economy

Credits: 5

Department: Women Studies (Tacoma)

Quarter Offered: Autumn 2014

Instructor: Cynthia Howson

Description: Explores impact of "modernization" and "development" on status and roles of women in selected Western and non-Western societies. Critical analysis of assumptions about women's responses to social change which have guided research, development planning. Examines cultural practices, economic arrangements, government policies to understand opportunities and obstacles confronting women in developing countries today.


A list of Labor Studies minor courses offered since Fall 2009 at the University of Washington, Seattle campus.

To learn whether a class will be offered in the future, please contact the relevant department.

Past Courses - UW Seattle

American Ethnic Studies

Anthropology

Communication

Comparative History of Ideas

Economics

Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences

Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies

Geography

History

International Studies

Law, Societies, and Justice

Political Science

Social Work

Sociology

A list of Labor Studies minor courses offered since Fall 2009 at the University of Washington, Tacoma campus.

To learn whether a class will be offerred in the future, please contact the relevant department.

Past Courses - UW Bothell

Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences

A list of Labor Studies minor courses offered since Fall 2009 at the University of Washington, Tacoma campus.

To learn whether a class will be offerred in the future, please contact the relevant department.

Past Courses - UW Tacoma