Pharmacology
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Frank Vincenzi, Ph.D.,
Professor Emeritus

Vincenzi's Home Page
Publications
Course Websites
  conj543  HuBio543
  phcol536  phcol568

Email: vincenzi@uw.edu
Box 357280
HSC E419

Office: 206.543.1993
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I no longer have a bench research program and I am not accepting graduate students or postdoctoral fellows. Earlier research interests and contributions may be found on my web site.

Current scholarly research and teaching efforts are aimed at providing:

1) sound understanding of the basic principles of pharmacology.

FigureThis is provided in Human Biology 543 (Principles of Pharmacology, I) a course required of second year medical students. The course (for which I am Chairman) is based on current molecular pharmacology and cellular biology and takes a typical reductionist, allopathic medical approach to the treatment of disease. The web site for HuBio 543 is restricted to UW users. However, the adjunct Web Site for Cardiovascular and Autonomic Pharmacology is not restricted. That site contains a 'Virtual Dog Lab' aimed at aiding learning about the actions and interactions of drugs on the cardiovascular system.

2) skills for dealing with stress and maintaining wellness.

These skills are practiced with students in UCONJ 531 (Mind Body Skills, An Experiential Elective). The course is currently offered to medical, nursing and pharmacy students. The course emphasizes the understanding of stress, its broad importance in illness and a variety of methods and skills for reducing elevated anxiety and stress. There is evidence that persons with such skills are more insightful and empathic. Thus, it is anticipated that provision of such skills will help create health care providers who are more holistic in their approach to life, self-care, and the care of their patients. Similar skills are needed among research scientists who are currently under immense funding pressures, but no formal mechanisms are currently in place to deal with this need.

3) increased insight into the role of mirror neurons and mirroring by the brain.

Mirroring is involved in communication, language, learning, emotional states, consciousness and empathy among other phenomena. Mirror neurons were discovered in primates by Giacomo Rizzolatti. Mirroring been studied in humans by Marco Iacoboni and his co-workers UCLA, where I had the privilege to be a visiting scholar in 2007.



 

Recent Publications 

Vincenzi FF[Auth]; +94 new citations - ABSTRACT

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