Pharmacology
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1998 Krebs Lecture

1998 Edwin G. Krebs Lectureship in Molecular Pharmacology

The Eleventh Annual Edwin G. Krebs Lecture in Molecular Pharmacology
Sponsored by an endowment from Sterling Winthrop, Inc.
presents:
Signaling via Phosphoinositide Kinases
by:
Lewis Cantley, Ph.D.
Professor, Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School; Chief, Division of Signal Transduction, Beth Israel Hospital

Wednesday, April 15, 1998
3:30 PM, Room T-625 HSC

Dr. Lewis Cantley is a leader in the study of regulation of cell growth and division by phospholipid and protein phosphorylation. He attended Wesleyan College, receiving his B.S. in 1971 and did his graduate studies in the Department of Chemistry at Cornell University, receiving his Ph.D. in 1975 for work on chloroplast coupling factor 1. He was a postdoctoral fellow in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Harvard and joined the faculty of that department as an assistant professor in 1978. From 1985 to 1992 he was professor of physiology at Tufts University School of Medicine. In 1992, he returned to Harvard as professor of cell biology. In a series of studies beginning in 1984, Dr. Cantley discovered kinases that phosphorylate phosphatidylinositol and implicated them in cellular growth control and in oncogenesis. These kinases produce phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate, a different signaling molecule than those produced by the hormone-sensitive phosphatidylinositol pathway. In addition, Dr. Cantley devised a novel method using degenerate peptide libraries for determining the substrate specificity of protein kinases. This method has been used to define the specificity of tyrosine kinases and the substrates which they bind through SH2 and SH3 domains and to predict the downstream targets of protein kinase signaling cascades. Dr. CantleyÕs research has added a new dimension to the functions of kinases in cellular regulation by demonstrating their role in phosphorylating key phospholipid signaling molecules which regulate cell growth and differentiation.

Dr. Cantley was an American Heart Association Established Investigator and a Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awardee. He currently serves on the scientific advisory boards for the A.T. ChildrenÕs Fund, New England Biolabs and Cell Therapeutics, Inc. In addition, he has served on the review panels for the National Institutes of Health and the American Heart Association.