Hazard Evaluation

Pilot: Total Worker Health in Salmon Fishermen from Cordova, AK (PNASH Small Grant 2014-2015)

Pilot?: 
Yes

This project is identifying chronic health risks associated with fishing in order to develop “total worker health” best practices. Building on partnerships between the UW, NIOSH – Alaska Pacific Office, and University of Alaska Fairbanks Sea Grant program, this pilot project is creating a new health risk appraisal tool and exam protocol for fishermen and clinicians.

Safety and Health of Latino Immigrant Forestry Services Workers in the Pacific Northwest (NIOSH 2014-2017)

Pilot?: 
Yes

This research-to-practice project is identifying and assessing injury and health risks for Latino immigrant forestry services workers in order to create story-telling based education and prevention materials aimed to reduce risks for workers. The project partnership includes the Northwest Forest Worker Center, Berkeley Labor Center and UW PNASH.

Pilot: Fishing Industry Filipino Migrant and Immigrant Work in the Subarctic (PNASH Small Grant 2013-2014)

Pilot?: 
Yes

Filipino migrants and immigrants are the dominant racial/ethnic workforce in fish processing in Unalaska/Dutch Harbor, Alaska, composing 28% of the total resident population. University of Alaska and Washington investigators are conducting in-depth interviews to understand unique injury risk factors and negative health behaviors affecting this vital group.

Pilot: Non-Fatal Injuries among Commercial Fishing Workers in Alaska, Washington, and Oregon (PNASH Small Grants 2014-2015)

Pilot?: 
Yes

Commercial fishing is the most hazardous occupation in the United States. This descriptive epidemiological study will provide estimates of the reported non-fatal occupational injuries among commercial fishermen, describe high-risk work processes, and identify vulnerable populations, such as young workers.

Heat Exposure, Injury Risk, and Productivity in Agricultural Workers (NIOSH 2014-2017)

Pilot?: 
No

This project aims to examine the association between heat exposure and traumatic injury risk in agricultural workers, the relationship between heat stress and productivity, and the feasibility of using a biomarker of heat acclimation to detect workers at risk for heat-related illness (HRI) and injury.

Feasibility Project: Risk Factors for Heat-Related Illness among Oregon Farmworkers (PNASH Small Grants 2012-2013)

Pilot?: 
No

Complementing our HRI pilot in Washington State, this one-year pilot conducted by Oregon State University (OSU) surveyed a farmworker community in Oregon, collaborating with our UW PNASH HRI project on the computer- based survey instrument.

Pilot: Transmission of Microorganisms in Dairy Farms (PNASH Pilot 2013-2014)

Pilot?: 
Yes

Dairy farming requires close contact between people and animals with transmissions that can be a source of zoonotic disease. In this small pilot a multidisciplinary team will survey work practices to provide insight into modifiable risk factors for microbial transmission with implications for the health of workers, dairy cows and the environment in a “One Health” model.

Pilot Project: Assessing Agricultural Safety and Health among Hmong Farmers (NIOSH/CDC 2011-2013)

Pilot?: 
Yes

Hmong refugees are increasingly being resettled throughout the U.S., and are frequently engaging in small, family-owned farm operations. This pilot project was important in taking a preliminary, foundational step towards fully investigating agricultural work hazards among refugees operating small-scale farms. Considering the significant challenges that refugees endure during the resettlement process, examining how life circumstances, in particular work, determine health status during this transition is a worthwhile undertaking.

Pilot Project: Study of Risk Factors for Heat-Related Illness in Agricultural Workers (NIOSH/CDC 2011-2013)

Pilot?: 
Yes

This two-year pilot, completed in FY2013, successfully generated baseline data and set the stage for future study of the association between potential Heat Related Illness (HRI) risk factors and heat effects as well as the development of interventions to reduce HRI. Heat exposure has been identified as an important cause of non-fatal illness and death in agricultural workers.