About Us: Training Faculty Profiles
Adult Track: Adam Carmel, PhD   |   Autism Track: Jennifer Gerdts, PhD
Bmed & Rehab NP Tracks: Ivan Molton, PhD  |   Child Track: Eileen Twohy, PhD
Adam Carmel, PhD

Work

My work activities include a balance of teaching, training, clinical practice, and implementation-related projects. My clinical work takes place within the Harborview DBT program where I provide outpatient DBT and DBT-ACES (an advanced level of DBT treatment focused on increasing employment and self-sufficiency). I also teach workshops and provide clinical supervision within the UW Psychiatry DBT program.


Teach

One the aspects of being a psychologist in an academic medical center that I enjoy is the range of teaching activities that are available. This includes providing instruction within didactic seminars, as well as demonstrating interventions for residents via direct observation. My approach to clinical supervision includes opportunities for live supervision and receiving real-time feedback (e.g. “bug-in-the-eye” model) as well as reviewing recorded sessions and fidelity monitoring.

 

 

Research

My research focuses on the dissemination and implementation of empirically supported treatments of suicidal behaviors. I’m particularly interested in developing and evaluating models of training to guide the process of rolling out EBPs within public sector settings. Recent work has focused on 1) evaluating clinician-level variables such as burnout and confidence in treating suicidal behaviors; and 2) training and dissemination of DBT-ACES.

Mentor

As a mentor, I try to strike a balance between providing support and guidance for professional growth, (e.g. considering various career paths, applying for post-doctoral fellowships) and attending to issues relevant to personal growth (e.g. balancing career with life and family goals). In our program, psychology residents gain experience providing care within multidisciplinary treatment teams and collaborating with other disciplines outside of psychology, and I enjoy supporting residents in this element of their training.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jennifer Gerdts, PhD

Work

My work spans teaching, clinical, and research in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and developmental disabilities. I direct the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) interdisciplinary training program, which prepares professionals to assume leadership roles in our field. The demand for services related to ASD has exceeded the supply of providers throughout the United States, and I am committed both to increasing our workforce and to refining our processes to better serve patients and families throughout the population. The majority of my direct clinical work takes place at the Seattle Children’s Autism Center where I oversee our diagnostic services, conduct diagnostic evaluations, and co-lead a social skills training program for adolescents.


Teach

I am dedicated to teaching up-to-date, evidence-based information about autism spectrum disorder and developmental disabilities. My teaching activities are broad and range from individual teaching and mentoring of junior clinicians, to direct teaching through lectures in the community and regular UW program coursework, to parent education about ASD, to various forms of educational scholarship through publications and regional and national presentations. Moreover, serving as UW LEND Director has been such a joy! It is so rewarding to expand the impact of training across disciplines and throughout our state.

 

Research

My recent research has focused on clinical and diagnostic processes in ASD and neurodevelopmental disabilities. Given the lengthy wait that families undergo for diagnostic evaluation, I am dedicated to improving general diagnostic services using evidence-based strategies and studying clinical outcomes of various models of care. I also have a background in clinical phenotypes of genetic changes/mutations related to ASD, and have a longstanding interest in understanding how genetic changes translate to observable phenotypes.

Mentor

My true passion in teaching is the individual mentorship of junior clinicians. I am energized by supporting and watching the next generation of professionals grow and develop over time. In individual supervision, I prioritize developing a trusting relationship with my mentees and my approach to clinical supervision is strengths-based. I also enjoy individualizing training experiences for students. I am cognizant of not putting my own agenda on trainees-- we decide jointly what experiences would help them along their path. I am so fortunate to do this job, and to work with such passionate, bright, and committed students. There is good learning to be done on both sides!

Ivan Molton, PhD

Work

My work is evenly split between clinical service, research, and supervision. On the clinical side, I provide psychological care to patients with acquired disabilities, including spinal cord injury, brain injury, cerebral palsy, and multiple sclerosis. My work there focuses on adjustment to disability and on health behavior change. I also get to supervise residents and fellows during their rotations at the UW Medical Center.


Teach

Although I don’t teach formal courses, one of the best parts of my job is working with psychology residents and fellows, who come with a great deal of intellectual curiosity and a desire to learn. Mostly I try to give them the resources and information they need, without getting in their way.

 

 

Research

Like most of us in psychology, I’m interested in almost everything. Most of my work has focused on the intersection of gerontology and rehabilitation, and in looking at ways to improve healthy aging for people with mobility limitations. I also do some work in psychological approaches to manage chronic symptoms like pain and fatigue. Most recently, I’m looking at a brief psychological intervention to improve a person’s ability to cope with medical uncertainty. Over the years many residents and fellows have worked with our research team on data analysis and manuscripts.

Mentor

As a department, our goal is to mentor our trainees wherever they need it. For some trainees, that’s about developing new research skills, and for others it’s about getting training in a particular clinical approach or in working with a particular population. We also work closely with our trainees in professional development and the all-important work/life balance. I like to think our approach to mentorship is equitable and collegial, and never hierarchical.

Eileen Twohy, PhD

Work

I spend my days at the main campus of Seattle Children’s Hospital (SCH), where my work primarily consists of clinical care and teaching. My two areas of focus are the provision of effective, trauma-informed treatment for youth and families in suicidal crises and the promotion of equitable access to behavioral healthcare. I do this work through clinical care and training in our Crisis Care Clinic (CCC), the Mood and Anxiety Program (MAP), and the Consultation/Liaison (C/L) service at SCH. Working in a medical setting allows for rewarding interdisciplinary collaboration and the opportunity to increase awareness of and attention to the psychosocial factors that impact child and adolescent health.


Teach

Teaching is the primary reason that I chose a career in an academic setting. In addition to the occasional guest lecture, most of my teaching takes place at the bedside, in community trainings, during individual and group supervision of clinical work, and at regional and national meetings. I am happiest in my job when I am teaching families or clinicians about how to care for suicidal individuals with compassion and nonjudgment. I find it especially fun and fulfilling to work with trainees on finding the balance between science and heart that drives each of us in our work as clinical psychologists. .

 

Research

My work focuses on the development and dissemination of least restrictive treatment approaches for youth experiencing behavioral health crises. In the Crisis Care Clinic at SCH, we are studying a novel, urgent care approach to caring for suicidal youth, aimed at reducing unnecessary hospitalization and empowering families to recognize and capitalize on their strengths. Other areas of research interest include transdiagnostic approaches to pediatric behavioral healthcare and the provision of evidence-based treatment for youth with chronic medical conditions.

Mentor

It is an honor and a joy to participate in training the developing psychologists who will soon be our colleagues. The road to becoming a psychologist is demanding and often nonlinear, and I enjoy working with trainees as they discover their areas of passion and cultivate healthy practices for a sustainable career. Without fail, I also learn in the process. I strive to reduce barriers to access for trainees of color and other underrepresented groups in our field and to implement antiracist and culturally sensitive approaches to training in behavioral healthcare.  


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