Olympic National Park

University of Washington
Psychology Internship Program

Additional Internship Opportunities

  1. Research
    Psychology residents may apply to participate in a year long program and seminar on research skills and grantsmanship training. Participation in this activity includes the provision of 6 hours per week of release time from clinical rotations to participate in a seminar devoted to teaching skills needed for developing and writing grants, and to pursue development of a grant proposal or research project under the mentorship of an internship faculty member. Participation in the program is most appropriate for those residents who have either completed or are in the latter stages of their dissertation research, are interested in research areas that can be mentored by faculty members of the internship and are looking towards career choices in which grant writing skills will be needed. Residents are not required to participate in the seminar program. Psychology residents not participating in the grantsmanship seminar program may apply for one half-day (4 hours) of release time, per week for research (including dissertation research) with an internship training faculty supervisor.
  2. Committee Membership
    Several committees are actively involved in the planning and organization of the internship training program. Psychology residents typically volunteer for these committees, or are elected by their fellow residents at the beginning of the year. Listed below are current committees available for resident participation.
    1. Didactic Planning Committee
      (Co-Chairs: Gretchen Gudmundsen, Ph.D. and Maria Monroe DeVita, Ph.D.)
      Functions: To review, revise, organize and plan didactic modules for the following internship class.
      Resident Participation: Two to four residents serve on the committee which meets in the Spring. Residents work with various faculty members and obtain feedback from fellow residents in the planning and scheduling of prospective didactic modules with specific didactic presentations.
    2. Diversity Advancement Committee
      (Co-Chairs: Ty Lostutter, Ph.D. and Tiara Dillworth, Ph.D.)
      Functions: To provide training of residents and faculty on issues of individual and cultural diversity as these relate to theories and methods of assessment, diagnosis, and effective intervention; consultation, supervision, and evaluation, and research methods/design. (This diversity training includes: ethnic minorities, gender/sexual orientation, physical disabilities, SES,age, and others). To serve as a resource "hub" of information (clinical and social service resources, research, lectures, and expertise at the University of Washington and surrounding community) on diversity issues for everyone involved in the internship. To recruit and retain diverse residents, fellows, faculty, and speakers as well as those interested in diversity issues.
      Resident Participation: All interested residents are encouraged to participate on the committee which remains active throughout the internship year. Residents work with regular and allied faculty members, as well as representatives from the local community.
    3. Professional Development Committee
      (Chair: Dawn Ehde, Ph.D.)
      Functions: To provide guidance, information, and support to the residents during the internship year. Example activities that this committee sponsors include a Career Fair, Post-Doctoral Fellowship Fair, Mentoring, and opportunities to practice job talks.
      Resident Participation: At least two residents serve on the committee each year who provide a crucial link to the resident class. The resident representatives play an active role in shaping the focus of the committee’s work in that particular year.
    4. Steering Committee
      (Chair: Elizabeth McCauley, Ph.D.)
      Functions: To assist in the administration, planning, organizing, and functioning of the overall internship training program.
      Resident Participation: Each of three residents serves on the committee for four months. The committee meets once every two months. Residents work with other residents, track coordinators, various faculty members, and psychologists in the local community in overseeing the administrative functioning of the internship training program.
  3. Post-Internship Opportunities
    A number of post-doctoral positions at the University of Washington are available every year. Psychology residents who become productively involved with research and who exhibit superior clinical performance may compete successfully for these positions. UW-affiliated post-doctoral fellowships in psychology are typically available through the Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine, Anesthesiology, Psychology, School of Nursing, School of Social Work, and School of Dentistry. The Psychology Internship does not administer these post-doctoral fellowships. Prospective psychology residents who would like to discuss post-doctoral training possibilities should contact the Psychology Internship Office, psychsom@uw.edu). Alternatively, some residents opt to pursue postdoctoral positions at other Universities, entry-level faculty positions, or other positions, such as Research Scientists. Listed in the following Table is a summary of positions held by recent graduates of the internship training program.
 

INTERNSHIP CLASS

POST-INTERNSHIP POSITION

2011-2012

2012-2013

Post-Doctoral Fellowship Affiliated with UW System

6

5
Post-Doctoral Fellowship Outside UW System

5

5

Faculty / Research Scientist

1

0

Other (Private Practice, Consulting Business)

0

2

Public Agency Mental Health Services

0

0

Returned to Complete Dissertation

0

0