Resident Life: Resident Profiles
photo of UW campus photo of UW campus
Adult: Jennifer Pearlstein   |   Autism: Anthony Osuna   |   Bmed/RehabNP: Jonathan Tsen   |   Child: McKenna Parnes
Jennifer Pearlstein
Psychology Resident
Adult Track

Why UW Psychology Internship?

I was drawn to the UW Psychology Internship due to the research and clinical opportunities that are well-suited to deepen and extend my skills and help me reach my career goals. The clinical rotations and settings on the general Adult Track (UWMC outpatient clinic and HMC Outpatient Psychiatry/Psychology Clinic (5 East Clinic)) challenge me to adapt to providing effective time-limited evidence-based care to diverse clinical populations in an interdisciplinary and fast-paced hospital environment. These rotations also offer opportunities to learn new evidence-based strategies from expert clinicians related to problems for which I have less experience (substance use disorders, trauma, psychosis). I have particularly appreciated the opportunities to be part of the multidisciplinary comprehensive Dialectical Behavior Therapy program and to learn and administer Cognitive Processing Therapy. I was also attracted to the opportunity to have protected research time and work with research mentors. The opportunities to further my program of research through collaborations in both psychology and psychiatry has made UW an ideal setting for my clinical internship. Finally, I was enamored by how well the culture and values in this program align with my own. I am deeply invested in serving vulnerable and underserved populations and I appreciate the extent to which this is a priority at UW. I am also motivated to improve training to enhance diversity, equity, and inclusion and this program offers a number of ways to get involved. The faculty and staff at UW are very warm and collaborative, and I chose this internship in large part because I felt I would be both challenged and supported.


Education

University of California, Berkeley, PhD Candidate in Clinical Psychology

University of California, Berkeley, MA in Psychology

Truman State University, BS degrees in Psychology and Cognitive Science


Follow Me For A Week

Sunday
Morning:   Sleep in, brunch with friends
Afternoon:   Hike/explore the outdoors with my pups or read in the park
Evening:   Meal prep, relax and recharge before the week
     
Monday
Morning:   Chart review, see patients for individual outpatient psychotherapy
Afternoon:   Group supervision, lead DBT group, attend DBT consultation team
Evening:   Downtime, walk with pups at Ravenna or Green Lake
     
Tuesday
Morning:   Chart review, see patients for individual outpatient psychotherapy
Afternoon:   Individual supervision, see patients for individual outpatient psychotherapy, write notes
Evening:   DBT seminar, Netflix before bed
     
Wednesday
Morning:   Individual supervision (x2), see patients for individual outpatient psychotherapy
Afternoon:   See patients for individual outpatient psychotherapy, write notes/consult as needed
Evening:   Go for a run, cook dinner with partner, enjoy downtime
     
Thursday
Morning:   Research time (ongoing projects from graduate institution, work with new collaborators at UW)/td>
Afternoon:   Research time (ongoing research projects), didactics
Evening:   Long walk with pups, catch up with out-of-town family and friends on the phone/zoom
     
Friday
Morning:   See patients for individual outpatient psychotherapy
Afternoon:   Group consultation and supervision with psychiatry residents and psychologist/psychiatrist attendings
Evening:   Take-out with partner, watch Netflix/movies at home
     
Saturday
Morning:   Research/post-doc apps
Afternoon:   Hike, read in the park, run errands, or do chores
Evening:   Relaxing activities with friends (in-person or by zoom)
     

Clinical Rotations

Current: (07/01 - 12/31) UWMC Outpatient Psychiatry Clinic

Up Next: (01/01 - 06/30) Harborview Medical Center Outpatient Psychiatry

Career Goals

My career goals include conducting translational clinical research and practice that applies findings from basic affective and cognitive science to understand how individual differences in stress exposure and response manifest in psychopathology, and how we can harness those mechanisms to improve clinical interventions. In my research, I aim to (a) understand the cognitive, affective, and biological effects of stress in relation to psychopathology; (b) apply basic stress science to improve treatment; and (c) investigate the effects of identity-related stress on mental health. In my clinical work, I have been privileged to use empirically based practices aligned with my belief that harnessing each person’s strengths and values is essential for effective assessment and treatment. I use a hypothesis-testing approach informed by Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Dialectical Behavior Therapy, and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. For each client, I tailor my work to the goals, strengths, and needs of the client. In addition to clinical work and research, I am also passionate about contributing to mainstream publications and social media efforts about mental health and disability intended for general audiences to disseminate knowledge about mental health to reduce stigma and increase access to care. In my career, I aim to pursue research, clinical work, and advocacy to reduce the suffering caused by mental illness.


 

Anthony Osuna
Psychology Resident
Austism and Development Disabilities Track

Why UW Psychology Internship?

As a student with autism expertise, the UW internship program is the perfect blend of clinical training, research opportunities, and professional development. The network of autism researchers and psychologists accessible through the UW internship program make it ideal for students looking to further their experience in ASD-related work. In addition to it's professional opportunities, Seattle was a desirable destination for my partner and I due to its proximity to home (San Diego) and qualities as a city (access to nature, city life, etc.).


Education

UCLA -- B.A. Psychology

UCSB -- Ph.D. Candidate in Clinical Psychology


Follow Me For A Week

Sunday
Morning:   Sleep in
Afternoon:   Run errands with partner and pups
Evening:   Watch baseball, clean, and mealprep for the week
     
Monday
Morning:   Administer ASD and cognitive assessment at UW Center for Human Development and Disabilities
Afternoon:   Write reports and provide assessment feedback
Evening:   Go on a run around Greenlake
     
Tuesday
Morning:   Prep for inpatient ASD assessments
Afternoon:   Administer PBMU assessments / parent interviews
Evening:   Take my dogs on a long walk
     
Wednesday
Morning:   Meet w/ research mentor and work on dissertation
Afternoon:   PEERS social skills group
Evening:   Late dinner, play video games after work
     
Thursday
Morning:   See patients at Seattle Children's Autism Center's (SCAC) Mood and Anxiety Clinic
Afternoon:   Grantsmanship seminar and Didactics
Evening:   Co-host a show on Twitter Spaces with my partner
     
Friday
Morning:   Assessments at SCAC Gender Clinic
Afternoon:   Assessments at SCAC (TEAM evals)
Evening:   Date night w/ bae ♡
     
Saturday
Morning:   Prepare a filling breakfast/brunch
Afternoon:   Go out and see nature (explore new town, on on a hike, take dogs to a park, picnic)
Evening:   Social event with friends or cohort mates; try a new restaurant
     

Clinical Rotations

Current: (07/01 – 12/31) Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine Unit, Center on Human Development and Disability, and Seattle Children's Autism Center

Up Next: (01/01 – 06/30) — Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine Unit, Center on Human Development and Disability, and Seattle Children's Autism Center

Career Goals

My long-term goals relate to developing social skills interventions to help autistic individuals safely and effectively navigate social media and online contexts. Aside from my clinical and academic aspirations, a personal and professional goal is to mentor fellow BIPOC scholars and increase diversity within academia.

 

Jonathan Tsen
Psychology Resident
Behavioral Medicine Track

Why UW Psychology Internship?

I chose UW for internship year given its commitment to the scientist-practitioner model, with training opportunities in an academic medical center which align with my career goals The opportunity to work at a Level 1 Trauma Hospital in an interdisciplinary medical setting allows for residents to respond to the many needs of unique health and rehab populations including TBI, SCI, MS, stroke, amputees, acute/chronic pain, burns, peds, post-COVID conditions, functional neurologic disorder, etc. I was also drawn to several UW faculty leaders who are committed to promoting diversity and inclusion in the context of intersectional aspects of disability and illness. Moreover, they have demonstrated their commitment to burnout prevention and resilience in health care, as well as the education and supervision of future psychologists and leaders in the field. One of my favorite things about the program? It helps trainees climb upwards to their professional goals by promoting clinical psychology competencies in tandem with their trainees’ quality of life.


Education

Illinois Institute of Technology: PhD Candidate in Clinical Psychology – Rehabilitation Psychology Major Area of Study

Illinois Institute of Technology: MS in Clinical Psychology – Rehabilitation Psychology Major Area of Study

Wheaton College: BA in Psychology


Follow Me For A Week

Sunday
Morning:   Do some self-care, clean my apartment and catch up on some TV! Maybe go to the Farmer’s Market and pick up some local produce.
Evening:   Prep meals for the week. Join a writing group from 3-5pm. Relax and ward off the Sunday Scaries :)
Monday
Morning:   Alarm is off at 6a, and I imagine myself going to the gym—I roll the dice and see if that imagination becomes reality. 8:30a I’m at HMC in inpatient rehab for chart review. 9a meet with PM&R, nursing, social work, PT/OT/ST for huddle and then see my pts. 10a I have a supervision hour with Dr. Chuck Bombardier. 11a CORP. I take an hour break and find a quiet place to decompress.
Afternoon:   1-3p CORP. 3-5:30 inpatient rehab
Evening:   At 5:30, persuade one of my peers to go on a run or grab a drink/bite outdoors. Maybe both. Call it a day.
Tuesday
Morning:   Alarm is off at 6a, and I imagine myself going to the gym—I ultimately choose not to, and make myself a cup of coffee. 7:30a I’m at HMC for CORP. 9a see IPR pts. 11a CORP. I take an hour break and find a quiet place to decompress. 1/mo I’ll attend the Stewardship Committee to discuss with my peers and Dr. Kala Philips on how to manage vicarious trauma and emotional wellbeing as a trainee in clinical psychology with challenging patients and related social contexts.
Afternoon:   1-3p IPR family conferences, where I meet with PM&R, nursing, social work, PT/OT/ST and pts and their family caregivers to update them on progress and expected discharge date. 3-5:30p I see more IPR pts.
Evening:   At 5:30p I join my lab in Chicago via Zoom for our weekly research meetings or the APA division 22 rehab psychology Student Leadership Network monthly meetings to discuss trainee leadership engagement and wellbeing in rehab psychology. Relax for a couple hours and call it a day.
Wednesday
Morning:   Alarm is off at 6a, and I imagine myself sleeping in just an extra hour—usually take some time to make breakfast and relax. 7:30a I’m at HMC in inpatient rehab for chart review. 8a meet with Chuck for supervision hour. 9a I meet with PM&R, nursing, social work, PT/OT/ST for huddle. I take an hour break to plan and decompress and then see my IPR pts until 12p.
Afternoon:   12p I meet with residents and supervisors from the BMed Track for group supervision, we discuss scheduling and management issues and then overview challenging cases or interesting articles for journal club discussion. 1-5:30p I see my IPR pts.
Evening:   At 5:30, persuade one of my peers to go on a run or grab a drink/bite outdoors. Maybe both. Call it a day.
Thursday
Morning:   Alarm is off at 6a, I hit snooze until 7:30 disregarding all sleep hygiene principles. 8a hop on zoom with a cup of coffee for the Neurorehab seminar. 9a-11a I “work on my dissertation” or on less anxiety provoking ongoing research projects. 11a-1p at some point I finally hit the gym!
Afternoon:   -2p once a mo I attend the Diversity Equity and Inclusion committee meeting. 1-3 I work on my dissertation or other research. 3-5p I attend group didactics.
Evening:   Relax and catch up with friends
Friday
Morning:   Alarm is off at 6a. I head to the gym at 7a. 8:30a I’m at HMC in inpatient rehab for chart review. 9a meet with PM&R, nursing, social work, PT/OT/ST for huddle and then see my pts. 10a I have CORP. I take an hour break and find a quiet place to decompress.
Afternoon:   1-3p I have CORP. 3-5:30p I see inpatient rehab.
Evening:   I meet up with my friends for happy hour at a patio to celebrate the end of the week!
Saturday
Morning:   Sleep in, join my family for our regular Zoom-calls , work on personal projects
Afternoon:   Go adventuring! Hiking, relaxing at a beach, or trying out some of the local food scenes in Seattle

Clinical Rotations

Current: (07/01 – 10/31) Harborview Medical Center (HMC) Inpatient Rehab (IPR), and Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Program (CORP)

Up Next: (11/01 - 02/28) HMC Inpatient Consult Liaison Service in Acute/Chronic Pain and IPR Pain Service

Last: (03/31 - 06/30) HMC Pediatrics, Amputee Clinic, and Burns, and CORP

Career Goals

My goal is to pursue a career as a clinical psychologist or clinician educator psychologist, specifically in the field of rehab psychology. Clinically, I enjoy working with patients and family caregivers in their adjustment to illness/disability using a CBT and MI approach in both IP and OP settings. I also find meaning in committing to collaboration and care with relevant healthcare providers while promoting the quality of life of our patients and their communities. My research has historically focused on issues related to diversity such as cross cultural psychological barriers to help-seeking among Asian and Asian Americans, microaggressions and discrimination against people with disabilities, and caregiver well being. My dissertation is currently on stigma, interpersonal functioning, depression and suicide among caregivers of people with chronic illness and disability. I enjoy using this knowledge to promote culturally informed care in my clinical work as well as promotion of trainee education and growth in the field.

 

McKenna Parnes
Psychology Resident
Child Track

Why UW Psychology Internship?

I was excited about the UW internship because of the opportunities across various rotations that would allow for breadth and depth of training. The ability to train in brief intervention through the inpatient rotations while also having exposure to long-term interventions on the outpatient rotation was a priority for me during this year. The dedicated research time and grantsmanship seminars also set UW apart from other internship training programs. Moreover, there is a unique culture in the Seattle area that prioritizes work-life balance. This was a skill I hoped to learn on internship and felt UW/Seattle Children’s Hospital could support.


Education

Sarah Lawrence College; B.A., Psychology

University of Pennsylvania; M.S.Ed., Counseling and Mental Health Services

Suffolk University; M.S., Clinical Psychology

Suffolk University; Ph.D. Candidate, Clinical Psychology


Follow Me For A Week

Sunday
Morning:   Wake up early, walk to Ballard farmer’s market to pick up fresh produce
Afternoon:   Clean house, bake something to share with others at work.
Evening:   Cook dinner, work on research.
     
Monday
Morning:   Wake up at 6:30 am, make lunch for the day, arrive at hospital at 8 am and review charts before morning meetings. Join team meetings and start seeing patients.
Afternoon:   Join team meetings, run group, call patient’s parents to check in, write notes, attend supervision.
Evening:   Go for a run, heat up dinner./td>
     
Tuesday
Morning:   Wake up at 5:45 am and meet up with a friend for a run. Make lunch for the day. Arrive at hospital at 8 am and review charts, check-in with colleagues before joining meetings. Start seeing patients.
Afternoon:   See patients, respond to emails, prep materials for patient evals, call patient’s parents to check in, write notes, attend supervision.
Evening:   Heat up dinner, attend DBT seminar from 6:30 pm – 8 pm.
     
Wednesday
Morning:   Wake up at 6:30 am, quick HIIT workout or strength training. Arrive at hospital at 8 am and begin reviewing charts before meetings. Start seeing patients for the day.
Afternoon:   Join team meetings, call patient’s parents to check-in, run group, attend supervision, write notes, complete neuropsychological evaluation.
Evening:   Meet up with a friend for dinner.
     
Thursday
Morning:   Thursday is my research day. Wake up at 7 am and go for a run. Make breakfast and coffee. Start working on research at 8 am.
Afternoon:   Attend grant writing seminar from 1:15 pm – 2:15 pm and didactics from 3 pm – 5 pm.
Evening:   Make dinner; Watch a movie or show.
     
Friday
Morning:   Wake up at 6 am and go for a run. Make lunch. Get to work at 8 am to begin reviewing charts and join team meetings. Start meeting with patients for the day.
Afternoon:   Join team meetings, run groups, call patient’s parents to check-in, write notes, attend supervision, join DBT parent group from 3:30 pm – 5 pm.
Evening:   Order in dinner, hang out with friends.
     
Saturday
Morning:   Wake up early to drive out to a hike.
Afternoon:   Go to grocery store, pick-up food for the week.
Evening:   Walk to Gasworks park and enjoy dinner outside.
     

Clinical Rotations

Current: (07/01 – 09/30) Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine Unit (PBMU; Inpatient)

Up Next: (10/01 – 12/31) Psychiatry Consultation and Liaison Service (Inpatient)

Last: (01/01 - 06/30) Outpatient and Neuropsychological Assessment

Career Goals

My long-term career goal is to work as a clinical scientist at a research-oriented institution where I can teach and establish my own research laboratory. My clinical and research interests are focused on supporting positive development for youth who face greater social and structural barriers. I am also interested in developing and evaluating community-based interventions that leverage the power of supportive relationships for youth who may not have access to traditional mental health services.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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