P-3 Approaches

Across the country, there exists a wide variety of approaches to P-3.  While many P-3 approaches emerge organically at local- and district-levels, other approaches are being carefully designed, tightly defined, and intentionally implemented in specific sites. Often, with these more formal approaches to P-3, an institution of higher education or other organizaton leads the effort.

The resources on this page provide information about some of the more formal, institutionally led approaches to P-3 that exist around the country:

Synopsis:

The Child-Parent Center (CPC) Program is a center-based early intervention model that provides comprehensive educational and family-support services to economically disadvantaged children from preschool to early elementary school. The CPC program was established in 1967 through funding from Title I of the landmark Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. Initially implemented in four sites and later expanded to 25, the program is designed to serve families in high-poverty neighborhoods that are not being served by other early childhood programs. The overall goal of the program is to promote children's academic success and to facilitate parent involvement in children's education.

Synopsis:
The New Schools Project is a PreK-3rd grade initiative between the Erikson Institute and Chicago Public Schools to promote educational excellence for young children from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Their professional development partnerships focus on the oral language and literacy foundations essential for school success and high levels of learning across content areas, including English, language arts, math, science, and social studies. 
Synopsis:

FirstSchool is a PreK to Grade 3 initiative led by the FPG Child Development Institute and the University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill School of Education to promote public school efforts to become more responsive to the needs of an increasingly younger, more diverse population. FirstSchool unites the best of early childhood, elementary, and special education, while embracing an inquiry-based approach to change.