Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine Fellowship

curtis and stapleton

Mentors and Mentoring Committees

Early in the first year of fellowship the Fellowship Program Director (Mark Tonelli) meets with each fellow to determine their general research interests and direct them to faculty whose research complements their interests. Fellows will then independently arrange to meet with these potential mentors. The two Mini-Sabbaticals are designed to allow ample free time to meet with as many potential mentors as possible. Fellows should arrange these meetings well in advance to avoid scheduling conflicts.

Fellows are encouraged to talk to the mentees of a prospective mentor. It is important to identify a mentor with strong mentoring skills, but equally as important to ensure a personality match. Fellows should seek a mentor who will foster their productivity. Be aware of mentors who exhibit the following less-than-ideal characteristics:

 1.    The avoider or the overcommitted: someone who is not available or accessible.
 2.    The criticizer: someone who criticizes freely but never makes positive comments.
 3.    The pushover: someone who compliments but never gives constructive criticism.

Primary Mentor

By the end of the first year, all fellows should have identified one primary research mentor and verified that decision with the individual. This faculty member will be primarily responsible for helping develop and implement a career development plan. Mentors must be able to provide adequate resources, including time, space, supplies, expertise and effort. Choosing a primary mentor from within the Division provides the fellow a strong advocate not only within the division, but also within the local and national pulmonary community.

Primary Mentor Outside the Division

The Division encourages fellows to collaborate with a variety of faculty both inside and outside the Division. Choosing a primary mentor outside the Division may provide the fellow with direct access to resources and expertise the Division may not be able to provide.

The fellow may identify a primary mentor outside the Division, but must also identify a secondary mentor within the Division. The primary mentor in this case will first need to meet with the Division leadership (Robb Glenny or Randy Curtis) to clearly understand their role and responsibilities from the perspective of the Division.

Expectations of the Primary Mentor

The Division's detailed Mentor Roles and Responsibilities policy can be found here and is highlighted below.

 1.    Work with mentee to jointly complete the division's official Mentoring Plan template.
        Review and update this document at each Mentoring Committee meeting.
 2.    Help fellows determine their short- and long-term goals and set a timetable for
        accomplishing these goals, including abstract, manuscript and grant submissions.
 3.    Help the fellow understand the requirements for transition to a faculty position at UW
         and elsewhere, if desired.
 4.    Assist in the identification of interesting and feasible research questions; identify
        other resources and potential collaborators that may be useful to the fellow's
        projects. Help the fellow choose a mechanism for obtaining research training and
        offer advice in course work choices and navigation within the School of Public
        Health if applicable.
 5.    Establish a plan to learn basic principles of scientific conduct, communication of
        findings to colleagues, and receipt of constructive feedback.
 6.    Establish a plan for trainee's career development in professionalism and mentorship
        and leadership skills.
 7.    Provide lab or office space, computer, additional travel funds, access to technician,
        research coordinator, statistical or database support if applicable.
 8.    Meet with the mentee on a regular basis. Every other week is recommended; not
        to be less than once a month. Ensure Mentoring Committee meetings take place
        once every six months.
 9.    Review mentee's CV with Mentoring Committee.
 10.  Ensure the trainee receives feedback when presenting to lab meetings,
        works-in-progress sessions, research conferences, etc.

Secondary Mentor

While choosing a secondary mentor can be valuable, it is only a requirement if the primary mentor is outside the division or if the primary mentor is relatively junior or has a limited record of mentoring. Co-primary mentors are discouraged due to potential confusion of roles.

Mentoring Committee

At the beginning of the research year, fellows will form a Mentoring Committee. Under the direction of the primary mentor, the Mentoring Committee oversees the trainee's professional development, provides career counseling, and facilitates academic job placement in the latter years of training.

The committee will be composed of three to five members. Once trainees select their primary mentor and possible secondary mentor, the mentor(s) and trainee, with input from Drs. Glenny or Curtis, identify the additional two to four members of their committee. In addition to the mentor(s), the committee must include one of the following: Robb Glenny, Randy Curtis or Mark Tonelli. A member of the committee may be outside the Division, particularly if the scholarly project involves collaboration with outside faculty.

Fellows are required to meet with their committee once every six months. Fellows should arrange their first committee meeting by December of their first research year and are advised to begin arranging each committee meeting at least two months in advance of the due date. Fellows should ask their mentors about the possibility of having the mentor's administrative assistant help with scheduling the meeting.

Expectations of the Research Mentoring Committee

The Division's detailed Mentor Roles and Responsibilities policy can be found here and is highlighted below.

 1.   Meet once every six months. Review and update the Mentoring Plan at each
       Mentoring Committee meeting.
 2.   The mentor provides a written summary of each meeting, including action items, and
       circulates these minutes to all committee members and trainee for comment and
       approval. Provide final copy to Nina Beal, nbeal@uw.edu, for retention and program
       director review.
 3.   Help fellows determine their short- and long-term goals and set a timetable for
       accomplishing these goals, including abstract, manuscript and grant submissions.
 4.   Help identify interesting and feasible research questions; identify other resources
       and potential collaborators that may be useful to the fellow's projects.
 5.   Review mentee's CV to refine it for presentation.
 6.   Facilitate the fellow's career advancement.
 7.   Review the requirements for transition to a faculty position, if desired, and assist with
       the process of searching for a position.


Additional Information:


Mentor Roles & Responsibilities

Mentoring Plan Template

Research Project Proposal Template

Questions for Clinical Research Fellows to Ask Potential Mentors

Questions for Basic Science Research Fellows to Ask Potential Mentors

Fellow to Faculty Transition Notes

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