We Need Queer Youth Space

You might have heard, but queer youth from around the Seattle area have been organizing to create something new. Last year, queer young people came together around a three hour “Queer Youth Mutiny” to debate and construct a new vision for serving all queer youth. A new and innovative model was crafted by young people to center the experiences of youth. No longer would non-profits merely serve young people, but adults and young people would be partners, collaborators, and social change mentors to young people, and vice versa.

We decided to form a new non-profit, and we brought together young people and adult supporters to come together to work with other young people for personal wellness. We have designed a new way to challenge the frustrating symptoms of oppression and heteronormativity that young people face (THREE WINGS) and we have based young people as the leaders and the visionaries of a physical location. Thus, now as we are getting closer and closer to opening our location, and as our leasing negotiations continue, we need your help.

If you are interested in helping out the queer youth community, either as adults or as young people, see “Get Involved” Give this movement a hand with your skills and your ideas that you hold true.

warmly, kyle r (q center staff + qys rep)

info@queeryouthspace

To find out what we have been up to, check out our site.


Creating Community Engagement Committee for the Q Center

With five students, I am leading the University of Washington Q Center’s effort create a “Community Engagement Committee” (CEC) of Puget Sound citizens, organizational and student constituencies’ representatives. The committee’s purpose is to help community members engage, support, and invest in Q Center student constituencies’ goals. At its best, the committee can strategically unify the energies and resources from Seattle-area communities to serve the Q Center.

Potentially, the committee can help build a more resourceful and strategic UW Q Center. The committee’s goal is to create coherent student messages to the Seattle community welcoming their input and resources. The committee to work with community members to determine ways to invest financial and human resources to advance all our programs’ agendas.

Leoule’s role at the Q Center as a Research Assistant:

At the University of Washington, I work to create new learning communities. In teams, we develop strategies for new partnerships by merging organizational agendas. These teams implement ideas to promote student learning opportunities.

I use University of Washington’s social capital and networks to mobilize resources and create learning communities that merge students’ interests with organizational goals.

My work hopes to improve the quality of students’ relationship with the university and Puget Sound organizations.


Let’s Talk About “Coming Out.”

It’s National Coming Out Day, so you may expect to see a blog about all the reasons that coming out is awesome. You may expect to see me encouraging people to come out en masse. But I am not going to do that.

Things I think:

It’s fucked up that there is pressure on queer people to “come out” regardless of what circumstances they are facing in their lives.

It’s fucked up that people are outed without their consent.

It’s fucked up that there is this idea that there is a state of “being in the closet” and being “out” as if they are two starkly different positions. People are very rarely “out” to everyone in their lives, and so it’s hard to distinguish what “out” really means.

I think it’s fucked up that coming out has been built up into this mandatory step in queer peoples’ lives, as if they can’t truly be queer until they start telling people.

You do NOT need to “come out” to be queer. If you identify as queer or lesbian or gay or pansexual or any of those other identities, then you are. And telling other people about that does not automatically make it any more legitimate.

Some people feel awesome after coming out.

For some people, coming out is really important, and it can be liberating.

Life can get a lot harder for some people when they come out.

Sometimes coming out is not in a person’s best interest, either because it could jeopardize their job, family relationships, or safety.

It can be really encouraging to have people around you come out, whether they are friends, family, or even celebrities. And that can lead to more “acceptance” (whatever that means) of queer people. And if you come out, you can in turn inspire people around you.

Here is what I ultimately think: only you are an expert in your life, and so you are the only person who should have ultimate say in the whens, hows, and whos of coming out. Some people will say that coming out is the biggest moment of being queer. I strongly disagree. I think that you can come to terms with being queer, love yourself as a queer person, and never tell another living soul. It’s all about what feels right for you, and you shouldn’t ever let anyone tell you otherwise.

– Jessica


Queer Guide to Dawg Daze

queer guide to dawg daze eventsThe UW community welcomes its students back to campus with an annual week-long extravaganza of events, introductions, and workshops called Dawg Daze.  To new students this is an opportunity to embrace all that the campus has to offer- clubs, resources, student groups, academic programs, housing accommodations, and more.  This was how i found the Q center when i first came to campus- during the sexuality, gender, and treats information session- the rest is history.  As a returning student it is an opportunity to share what i have learned with new students and explore the campus in a new light, one with a year’s experience- that of having changed (potential) majors, of having been acquainted with new perspectives and goals, of inhabiting the truths of my true gender identity, and the need rediscover the campus with these changes in mind.  The events are designed as such- for all students.  This said, the Q Center, along side GBLTC, DLP, and CCSL has planned a week full of queer events!  Be sure to check them out for more information on queer resources on campus, how to get involved, and meet new friends!  Don’t be shy, come on by!

For questions, comments, concerns, accessibility accommodations, or more details email uwqcwebmaster@gmail.com






THIS IS YOUR QUEER GUIDE TO DAWG DAZE!
official dawg daze site

*Monday 9/26– Gay Bingo
2pm-3pm Mary Gates Hall 238

Come join the brothers of Delta Lambda Phi for five intense rounds of bingo and compete for fabulous prizes. The only fraternity for gay, bisexual, and progressive men will ensure that you have a good time, with ice breakers and complimentary refreshments. Feel free to come and go as you please, drop-ins are more than welcome.

Hosted By: Delta Lambda Phi

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*Tuesday 9/27– Sexuality, Gender, & Treats! OH MY!
10am-11am, 11am-12pm, 1pm-2pm Q center- 450 Schmitz Hall

Meet new people, get some info, and eat candy at the Q Center- 450 Schmitz Hall!

*Tuesday 9/27– Brown Bag it at the Q
12pm-1pm Q center- 450 Schmitz Hall

BYOF! Bring your lunch and hang out in the Q Center to meet new friends, catch up with old ones, and just generally queer it up! The Q Center is the UW’s gender and sexuality resource center and is located at 450 Schmitz Hall.

*Tuesday 9/27– Queer Social
3pm-5pm Q center- 450 Schmitz Hall

Come hang out at the Q Center- 450 Schmitz for a chance to have fun, play games, and meet other queer students. Treats will be provided!

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*Thursday 9/29– Ask the Sexpert Panel
5pm-6:30pm Mary Gates Hall 389

Brought to you by the Campus Coalition for Sexual Literacy, this is a whole new level up from your high school Sex Ed class! Ask the Sexpert is an open and respectful forum where all your questions about sexuality can be answered. We’ve got some sexuality professors and experts at your disposal. If you’ve got questions (no matter how “strange”) or if you’re interested in sexuality education and activism, check this event out! There will be free condoms!

Hosted By: Campus Coalition for Sexual Literacy

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*Friday 9/30– Welcome Luncheon
11:30am-1pm Walker Ames Room, Kane Hall

Kick of school year with a gathering of queer students, staff, faculty, and allies! A great way to meet people and get information on queer happenings and resources on campus over some free food!

*Friday 9/30– Queer Rollerskating
7pm-9pm IMA Gym A

Come cruise the IMA gym on your roller skates! Skate your way around Gym A to some fabulous roller disco music. Admission is free for currently enrolled students and faculty/staff, and spouse/same sex domestic partner IMA members. There is a $7.00 fee for guests (16 yrs of age or older). All equipment is provided. Skate rentals are free w/Husky Card, faculty/staff ID, or spouse/same sex domestic partner IMA membership card. There is a $1.00 skate rental fee for guests (16 yrs of age or older). Faculty/staff without an IMA membership pay the IMA single use fee of $5.00

Hosted By:
ASUW Gay, Bisexual, Lesbian, Transgender Commission (ASUW GBLTC), the Q Center


fierce bodies

Inclusivity at it’s sexy best!

“fierce bodies is a little company that believes in another way of doing business. we are a cottage industry that makes small, high quality batches of beauty products out of our home. we give you the transparency and input that we expect from all companies, large or small. we make products that are safe and healthy for people and the environment. they fit the needs of people with all body types.”

This local business is queer friendly, MCS friendly, Earth friendly, and body friendly. That’s A LOT OF FRIENDLY! The punchline is the commitment to community and building “positive, sustainable and successful relationships”.

Help them start up by donating!


Gil Scott-Heron, 1949-2011

Gil Scott-Heron, well known musician and artist, died over the weekend. He’s most famous for his spoken word piece The Revolution will Not Be Televised, which is about the need to begin the revolution inside your own mind before it can spread anywhere else.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rGaRtqrlGy8]

Racialicious did a nice piece compiling some of his videos and quotes from interviews and articles. Well worth checking out.

 

In solidarity,

Maggie


Jezebel knows my struggle

Over at Jezebel, one of my favorite pop culture feministy blogs, the headline story right now is called “Under Pressure: The Terrible Curse of ‘Most Likely to Succeed.’”

It’s taken a lot to work up the nerve to say this, but here goes. I, too, was voted “Most Likely to Succeed” in high school. Whew, I feel better now that I got that off my chest. It’s hard, ok? Knowing that all of those people in high school who were friends with you in order to get your answers to the homework really were looking up to you and respecting you the whole time.

My whole life was defined by this one moment in high school. I will forever be under pressure to be successful, because otherwise my classmates who I practically will never see again for the rest of my life except for our ten year reunion where I will hopefully get spectacularly drunk in order to deal with the whole thing will be disappointed. We don’t want to disappoint the classmates!

I’ve already got a lot of work to do in the not disappointing the classmates department, due to the whole being queer thing that no one knew about. So they’re probably already disappointed by me for not already being married and spawning like some of them. I must make up ground! I must become whatever it is they deem to be “successful,” forsaking my own definition of success and forgoing my own dreams. Because my high school class voted me MLS (that’s what those of us in the Likely Successes club call it. Didn’t know about the club? Probably because you’re not likely enough to be successful. It’s a cool club though – we have a secret handshake and discount rates on stress therapy sessions).

But other than the club, which is super fictitiously awesome, the MLS title hangs over me. I can’t judge myself based on my own definitions of success and happiness because I am continually trying to meet the expectations of a group of people who really don’t know me anymore. Because that’s totally possible.

I bet the people who were voted Class Clown and Best Hair have this problem too.

In love, solidarity, and sarcasm,

Maggie


Wanted Dead or Alive: why we should not be quick to rejoice the death of Osama bin Laden

Recently, the news of Osama bin Laden’s death has taken the United States by magnificent surprise and wondrous joy as swarms of Americans crowded the White House gates with their American flags and the President announced the success of the US Navy SEALS mission to storm into a village in Pakistan and to “smoke” bin Laden out of his compound. The mission was filled with intrigue and danger: military helicopters swooshing out of the sky, commandos caught in a deathly crossfire, shooting at America’s Most Wanted, killing one of his wives in the process, and finally declaring a victory after a decade of war and destruction in the region. An adrenaline-rush of American hypermasculinity on display, as the raid team penetrated the town where bin Laden was staying in, Abbottabad, Pakistan. But it is not just a show of macho military might. It is also the elevation of the masculinity of our soft-spoken and diplomatic President.  As one BBC commentator has noted, this has elevated Obama’s status from “wimp” to “warrior”. This has also significantly improved the President’s ratings (15% increase among the Republicans in fact) and has given a sense of relief and justice to many families of victims of 9/11 attacks. In short, the death of Osama bin Laden has returned the President to the status of a “man”, the United States to the status of world leader and savior, and the American people to the status of self-righteous sense of entitlement and justice. Everybody’s happy.

Sunday night, I was enjoying a nice hot cup of tea with my family members around a pit-fire when I received a text from a friend simply stating, “We killed Osama bin Laden!” At first, I thought it was a drunken joke. But then I received a similar message from a friend in D.C. celebrating in front of the White House. I quickly checked the online news and informed my family of the development. Everyone was obviously surprised. However, after 15 minutes of trying to figure out what had actually happened, we went back to our usual discussions. I, however, tried to follow the news online as the days went on. One of the articles that caught my eye was one on BBC explaining how the code name for bin Laden was, in fact, Geronimo. The name is derived from a 19th century Apache warrior who fought against white North American and Spaniard soldiers, to resist white supremacist efforts of Westward expansion and to preserve Native Americans’ lands and way of life. According to the BBC article, “[Geronimo's] struggle to resist the white Americans has led to him being depicted in a sympathetic light by many cultural historians.”

It is, therefore, no surprise that many Native Americans are upset by the use of the name Geronimo as a code word for bin Laden. To associate a great warrior in their history with a ‘known’ terrorist merely perpetuates negative stereotypes about indigenous peoples and “undermines the military service of native people.” To me, their sentiments of outrage make sense, are warranted, and should be taken seriously. However, I cannot help but to analyze the situation from a different perspective. It make sense to me that the code name for bin Laden would be Geronimo. Indeed, the projects of white supremacy, racism, westward expansion and ‘Manifest Destiny’ have not stopped in the deserts of the Wild West.

Nobody knows why the code name Geronimo was chosen in the first place. However, we should not be surprised by its appearance. Indeed after the attacks of 9/11, a lot of the rhetoric of the fight against terrorism and against bin Laden, such as “wanted dead or alive”, remind us of the old Hollywood Westerns: white dudes with rifles going into uncharted territory (usually deserts) to “smoke out” those “savages”. Of course in the movies, the white dudes with rifles are the good guys. Just like how US’s presence in Afghanistan, Pakistan and Iraq is seen as the ultimate battle between the nation of “progressiveness, democracy, human rights, civilization, good” and the culture of “backwardness, dictatorship, barbarism, savagery, evil.” It is Us v. Axis of Evil. It is our objective and impeccable justice system v. shariaa law. It is our women running for president v. women wearing burkas and staying at home. It is Manifest Destiny Version 21. We have heard this same rhetoric many times during Colonialism and the “white man’s burden”. In our history, we have very rarely allowed the possibility that people of color and people from the Global South have agency, can determine their own paths, can fight for their own rights, and can provide for their own livelihood and happiness. Nevermind that decades of colonialism, pillage, militaristic occupation, and neo-liberal economic policies have left the Global South the unhappy short end of the deal. Nevermind the lack of education, development and opportunities in those countries. Our yardstick for determining “progressiveness” has been how well a nation treats its women/gays/minorities. It is a new Imperialism of tolerant, “multicultural” diversity, because our state has never treated its women/gays/minorities poorly. And should a nation fail to meet the requirements, the United States military (and allied nations) will descend upon it in all of its hypermasculine might and throw the torch of enlightenment into the Heart of Darkness. Colonel Kurtz-style. The irony as always lies in the fact that in our rhetoric of ‘liberation’ we are using the state and the military, two sexist and homophobic institutions, to push forward an agenda of equality and freedom. Naturally then, we are at ease to ignore the violence that emanates from these institutions as we support them to be our protectors against the monstrous Others.





In the War on Terror, we constantly tell ourselves “those people hate us”, but we are never to blame for that hatred. We are logical, humanitarian, and right. They are irrational, monstrous and evil. This is the basis for the new Eastward Expansion. Yes, we are fighting terrorism. Yes, we are getting rid of dictators. And we are doing all of that by murdering innocent people, destroying entire towns and villages, illegally detaining people in Guantánamo Bay, torturing them in black sites around the world (aka having other countries do the dirty-work for us), and spreading our militaristic influence in the region. Let’s not even consider the trillions of dollars spent in these wars and the outrageous military spending of the United States (which, by the way, is more than the combined military spending of the next 45 highest-spending states, accounting for almost half of the world’s entire military spending).

This is not a question of Osama bin Laden’s crimes, which deserve punishment. But we are quick to forget our own history of racism, imperialism, and militarism in the Middle East and South Asian countries. Since the attacks of 9/11 we have been given many reasons for invading Afghanistan, Iraq and Pakistan. Actually, I take that back. We didn’t really give a reason for rolling our tanks into Pakistan, nor did we ask for permission when sending troops into the territories of a sovereign state. Practically everything is justified in the War on Terror. Branding Islamist fighters as “illegal combatants” under international law covers our legal bases. Asking NATO to join our invasion and occupation of Afghanistan covers our diplomatic bases. Branding our quest to profit off of oil and other business ventures in Iraq as a mission to bring down a terrible dictator with nukes (which he didn’t have) covers our public image as the harbingers of democracy and human rights. Even if there are things that are not justified, who is going to stop Us? Our crimes against humanity will go on with virtual impunity while we point the finger at authoritarian brown/black people whom we once financed, sponsored, supported and protected. When do we see American leaders brought before the ICC, or UN-sanctioned special tribunals? Not with the United States’ veto at the Security Council.

There was a time when the United States had the sympathy of the world. On September 12, 2001, when I was still in Iran, my fellow Iranians went to the streets and lit candles for the victims of 9/11 in solidarity with the American people. And now the same people face heinous sanctions, horrifying inflation rates, and the horrendous prospects of war from Western powers. Clearly, attacking Afghanistan, Iraq and Pakistan is not just about revenge/justice for 9/11.

So again I ask, why wouldn’t bin Laden’s code name be Geronimo? Different century, same imperialism. Indeed, Geronimo was probably considered a terrorist back in those days. I wonder: about a century from now, would bin Laden be a martyred hero who was just trying to preserve a way of life and resist American Eastward Expansion and imperialism? Well, we don’t need to wait a century: he already is.

SH