Q Ink! (Winter Quarter)

Q Ink is a creative writing group run by the Q Center library. We will help peer edit and give comments and critiques to your stories. It will be a free writing space where you can let your creativity flow onto a page or a laptop. It will be a place where writers don’t have to feel awkward or afraid of sharing queer oriented stories. Each week will have a theme for our writing. Come on by and we will help one another learn, gain ideas, and most importantly WRITE!

Meeting dates for winter quarter: 2/7, 2/14, 2/21, 2/28, 3/7, 3/14

From: 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM in the Q Center (HUB 315)

The theme for 2/7 is “Fun and Games!” and the theme for 2/14 is “Love and Lust”

More themes will be revealed later!


Not Presenting, But Present

Hi. I am, as far as I can tell, a non-binary trans girl, but I am by no means whatsoever “out”. If I am not presenting or in a safe environment/place in life to tell people, is it wrong of me to be in spaces, use resources, or participate in discussions meant for queer or trans people? [Does my problem make sense? I don't know, I feel really conflicted with myself.]

This definitely makes sense and it’s… complicated! I think first and foremost you need to keep yourself in mind. Obviously, you don’t need to ‘present’ to be trans. You don’t need to announce to a room that you’re queer – either through words or through dress – to validate what you know is true about yourself, or even what you think could be true about yourself. I absolutely do not believe that you should feel in any way required to remove yourself from situations that you want to be in or would benefit from just because you aren’t out. Those spaces are still there for you, those resources are still yours to use, and those discussions are about you and about people like you. There aren’t a lot of queer people who haven’t gone through life being in the closet in some way; queer life is not restricted to those who have the ability (and in many ways, the privilege) to wear it on their sleeves. ‘Presenting’ as trans is a complicated concept, anyway, but I don’t want to get into that. I think the biggest potential obstacle would be queer people who don’t perceive you as such being somewhat wary with your presence. Given the way you phrased this question, I don’t think this is even slightly going to be an issue, but I think the biggest thing to keep in mind as someone who is passing/perceived as not queer is to not talk over the queer people around you, in the spaces and in conversations. And that’s really just a precaution for a situation that I don’t think is very likely. Bein’ queer is hard, you deserve to think of and for yourself. That space is yours, those resources are yours, and when you feel comfortable, those discussions are yours as well! I hope this helped, and good luck!


Qmmunity Building! (Winter Quarter)

Join us in the Q Center Mondays this winter for Q-mmunity Building!
We’ll be having weekly events to build community, make friends, de-stress, and be super queer together!

You’re invited to CRAFTERNOON DELIGHT! Crafternoon Delight is a craft circle hosted in the Q Center (HUB 315) on Mondays from 12:30-1:30. Hang out with queers and make cute crafts! We will supply the materials, but feel free to bring some of your own.

The first time we meet will be Monday, February 3rd. We’ll be making patches!


Uncensored: Gender, Sexuality, & Social Movements in Global Health

Uncensored: Gender, Sexuality, & Social Movements in Global Health

REGISTER NOW for the 11th Annual
Western Regional International Health Conference (WRIHC)

April 4-6, 2014
University of Washington | Seattle, WA 
WRIHC Student Committee | UW Chapter of GlobeMed | UW Department of Global Health

Dear Friends of Global Health:

A team of 30 students from across the University schools and departments have organized a conference around powerful topics in the margins of most discussions in global health — a deeper understanding of social and political movements, diverse sexualities and sexual health, gender-based violence, reproductive rights, global discrimination against the LGBTQ community, income inequality, and universal access to health care. With over 20 sponsors, and an additional 11 co-sponsors, the conference will feature perspectives from multiple disciplines, cultures and communities. The Western Regional Health Conference is for anyone interested in deepening their knowledge base about global health, and the impact of movements to improve health globally!

The keynote speaker is Stella Nyanzi, PhD, with the Makerere Institute of Social Research at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda. Her current research is focused on the politicization of sexuality in contemporary Uganda – with an emphasis particularly on unpacking mainstream religious framing of and contestations about sexual citizenship. Dr. Nyanzi is also conducting research about the vulnerability and resilience of young refugee and displaced women in Uganda towards HIV/AIDS. She is a featured author in the book, African Sexualities, which features many scholars from Sub-Saharan Africa.

We are offering a special registration rate through January 31:

Special Deal through January 31: Students $40 | Non-students $75.
Early Bird February 1-March 20: Students $50 | Non-students $100.
Regular Rates after March 21: Students $75 | Non-students $150.
Register now to get this rate before it goes up! Your registration includes attendance at any and all events on a first come, first served basis including 18 dynamic and thought-provoking breakout sessions in six categories; continental breakfast; admission to an evening film screening; poster sessions; and coffee breaks where you can network with colleagues and prominent organizations in the field!

If you have any questions, please write us at info@wrihc.org.

We look forward to a great conference!

 

Best regards on behalf of the Student Planning Committee,

Mariel Boyarsky, MPHc
Western Regional International Health Conference (WRIHC) Coordinator

 

 


NEW Support Group: Lavender Circle

The Lavender Circle is an open, affirming place to explore our identities and experiences, and have questions answered amongst a supportive group of peers.

Join us for discussions framed around gender identity, gender expression, sexual identity development, and more.  This group is not framed around ally development.

 

When: Wednesdays, 4:30 – 5:30 PM*
Where: Q Center (HUB 315)

 

*The Q Center will be closed to the public during this group.  Participants should arrive within 10 minutes of the start time.

 


NEW Trans* & Gender Queer Support Group

Looking for camaraderie and support around gender identity and/or expression? Look no further! Ready, get set, GENDER! Every Tuesday from 12:30-1:30 p.m. in the Q Center you too can meet with others who wish to explore the continuum of gender identity and expression through discussion, support of one another, and connection. This support group is facilitated by two master of social work students interning at the Q Center. Lor and Liz bring to the group years of experience in facilitation, community organizing, and expertise in gender and sexuality.

 

 

When: Tuesdays 12:30-1:30 p.m.—Starting January 21, 2014

Where: Q Center (HUB 315)

What: Trans* & Gender Queer Support Group

Why: Because we like you!

 


Creating a Safe Sex Space

Dear Queer, I’m interested in sex–particularly, “s**king and f**king.” It’s hard to find safe spaces in the area, though. What can *I* do to create a safe space for others to s**k and f**k?

I’m sorry for taking so long with this question, I was just really having a hard time trying to answer it. This is by no means my area of expertise, and I wanted to make sure I had something of value to get back to you with! Logistically speaking, I have no idea how you would go about creating your own space. However, I’ve been given a resource that I think you would find a lot of use in. The Center for Sex Positive Culture is “a nonprofit, membership-based community center” that aims “to inspire and assist volunteers to produce experiential events where members can explore their sexual interests in a physically and emotionally safe environment.” It caters to a lot of different sexual interests, from what I’ve seen on their website they are very conscious and respectful of interpersonal differences, and they put a HUGE stress on consent and safety (which are the two things I would have been talking about if I hadn’t found out about the CSPC). It looks like a pretty intense place and I don’t know if it would align with your interests but if what they offer isn’t up your alley they still do hold non-sexual socials that are open to anyone, are free, and exist to answer all of your questions. You can also email them at dropin@thecspc.org for more information. I wish I could give you something more concrete, but I think this organization is at the very least far better suited to answer any questions you have than I am, and I’m positive that you could make some really good connections there. Let me know if you have more questions, and good luck!


Winter Social Events!

Q Center Winter Dawg Daze Social

The Q Center is a fierce primarily student-run resource center dedicated to serving anyone with a gender or sexuality. Come by on Thursday, January 9th at 3:30 to learn more about the Q Center, eat sweets, meet new people, and play video games!

oSTEM Meeting

oSTEM is back and ready for our first meeting of the quarter! The point of this meeting is to welcome you into the new quarter and introduce yourself to the oSTEM community. So come around to say hi to new friends or greet old ones. There will be food!

When and Where: Thursday January 9th 4:30-5:30pm @ the Q Center***

oSTEM stands for Out in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. We aim to unite the LGBTQQIA students studying science, technology, engineering, and math to foster a strong professional and social network and to promote LGBTQQIA awareness within the academic and professional communities.

***- oSTEM’s meeting will be held along with the Q Center’s Social