QERM: An Interdisciplinary Graduate Program


Research

Alumni Research

You are encouraged to review the collection of theses and dissertations submitted by QERM graduates.

The following QERM theses and dissertations can be found on the QERM Wikipedia site:

  • Li, Ting 2011. Visualize the intrinsic and the extrinsic processes that determine the patterns of human mortality. Ph.D., University of Washington
  • Bracis, Chloe 2010. A model of the ocean migration of Pacific salmon. M.S., University of Washington.

  • Nesse, Hans 2009. Correlates of the decline of the Steller sea lion in the North Pacific. M.S., University of Washington.

  • Parsons, Amber 2009. Estimating Pacific Northwest Salmon Escapement: A Methods Review Based on Statistical First Principles. M.S., University of Washington.

  • Broms, Kristin 2008. Small game population reconstruction: model development and applications. M.S., University of Washington.

  • See, Kevin 2007. Modeling Carcinus maenas settlement patterns on the west coast of North America. M.S., University of Washington.

  • Gurarie, Eli 2008. Models and analysis of animal movements: From individual tracks to mass dispersal. Ph.D., University of Washington.

  • Taylor, Ian 2008. Modeling spiny dogfish population dynamics in the Northeast Pacific. Ph.D., University of Washington.

Theses and dissertations completed by the following QERM students completing their research with the Columbia Basin Research Project can be found online.

  • Beer, W. Nicholas. 1996. A growth model for larval salmon with application to field and laboratory observations of chinook salmon. M.S., University of Washington.

  • Bracis, Chloe 2010. A model of the ocean migration of Pacific salmon. M.S., University of Washington.

  • Brinck, Kevin W. 2002. Comparing methods for inferring site biological condition from a sample of site biota. M.S., University of Washington.

  • Gurarie, Eli. 2008. Models and analysis of animal movements: From individual tracks to mass dispersal. Ph.D., University of Washington.

  • Hamel, Owen S. 2001. The Dynamics and Effects of Bacterial Kidney Disease in Snake River Spring Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).
    Ph.D. University of Washington.

  • Hinrichsen, Richard A. 1994. Optimization Models For Understanding Migration Patterns of Juvenile Chinook Salmon. Ph.D., University of Washington.

  • Hyun, Saang-Yoon. 2002. Inseason Forecasts of Sockeye Salmon Returns to the Bristol Bay Districts of Alaska. Ph.D., University of Washington.

  • Li, Ting. 2008. Extension of the Vitality Model and Its Application. M.S., University of Washington.

  • Li, Ting 2011. Visualize the intrinsic and the extrinsic processes that determine the patterns of human mortality. Ph.D., University of Washington.

  • Passolt, Gregor 2012. A Predator Susceptibility Model of Juvenile Salmon Survival and a Voronoi Tessellation-based Approach for Generating Hypothetical Forest Landscapes. M.S., University of Washington.

  • Steel, E. Ashley. 1999. In-stream factors affecting juvenile salmonid migration, Ph.D., University of Washington.

  • Steele-Feldman, Abran M. 2006. Learning and animal behavior: exploring the dynamics of simple models. M.S., University of Washington.

  • Zabel, Richard W. 1994. Spatial and Temporal Models of Migrating Juvenile Salmon with Applications. Ph.D., University of Washington.
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