University of Washington

Reproductive, Perinatal and Pediatric Epidemiology Training Program

 
RPPE Core Faculty and Advisory Board Members

Gayle Reiber, PhD

Daniel A. Enquobahrie, MD, MPH, PhD

Beth Mueller, DrPH, MPH

Victoria L. Holt, PhD, MPH

Susan Astley, PhD

Colleen Huebner, PhD

Melissa A. Schiff, MD, MPH

David Yanez, PhD

RPPE Faculty Members

Reproductive Health Faculty Mentors

Shirley Beresford, PhD

Scott Davis, PhD

Jacqueline Gardner, PhD

Victoria L. Holt, PhD, MPH

Mary Anne Mercer, DrPH, MPH

Beth Mueller, DrPH, MPH

Katherine M. Newton, PhD

Melissa A. Schiff, MD, MPH

Delia Scholes, PhD, MS

Kirk Shy,MD,MPH

Pediatric Health Faculty Mentors

Susan Astley, PhD

Elaine Faustman, PhD

Therese M. Grant, PhD

Christine Gleason, MD

Colleen Huebner, PhD

Catherine Karr, MD, PhD, MS

Jane Q. Koenig,PhD

Charlotte Lewis, MD, MPH

Lisa Manhart, PhD, MPH

Mary Anne Mercer, DrPH, MPH

Jane M. Rees, PhD, RD, CD

Frederick Rivara, MD, MPH

Ann Vander Stoep PhD, MS

Melissa A. Schiff, MD, MPH

Jacqueline Starr, PhD, MS, MPH

Marcia Williams, PhD, MPH

Health Services Faculty Mentors

Ann Marie Kimball, MD, MPH

Diane P. Martin, PhD

Mary Anne Mercer, DrPH, MPH


Perinatal Health Faculty Mentors

Shirley Beresford, PhD

Daniel Enquobahrie, PhD, MPH, MD

Therese M. Grant, PhD

Beth Mueller, DrPH, MPH

Epidemiology, Genetics, Biostatistics, and Nutrition Faculty Mentors

Melissa A. Austin, PhD

Shirley Beresford, PhD

Harvey Checkoway, PhD

Karen Edwards, PhD

Daniel Enquobahrie, PhD, MPH, MD

Annette Fitzpatrick, PhD

Nancy Haigwood, PhD

Patrick Heagerty, PhD

Richard E. Hoskins, PhD, MPH

Ann Marie Kimball, MD, MPH

Irena King, PhD

Thomas D. Koepsell, MD, MPH

Andrea Z. LaCroix, PhD, MPH

Thomas Lumley, PhD

Diane P. Martin, PhD

Jane M. Rees, PhD, RD, CD

Gayle Reiber, PhD, MPH

Bruce Psaty, MD, PhD

David Siscovick, MD,MPH

Andreas Stergachis, PhD, MS

Noel S. Weiss, MD, DPH

David Yanez, PhD









Susan Astley, PhD

Dr. Astley is Professor of Epidemiology, and PI of 4 research projects that may provide applied research training experiences for reproductive, perinatal, pediatric research fellows. Dr. Astley's major professional goals are the primary and secondary prevention of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) through screening, diagnosis, training and research. Her past and present research activities include documentation of the lifetime profile of birth mothers of children with FAS and identification of factors that enhanced and hindered their ability to achieve sobriety; identification of neurochemical alterations associated with prenatal alcohol exposure using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS); identification of the diagnostic facial features of FAS and their corrrelation with underlying brain damage; assessment of the diagnostic utility of MRI, MRS and functional MRI in children with FASD; assessment of the efficacy of behavioral consultation intervention and social communication intervention targeted at children with FAS, their parents and teachers; documentation of significant declines in maternal drinking during pregnancy and prevalence of FAS among population-based samples in Washington State. Clinical programs and diagnostic tools developed by Astley and colleagues include the Washington State FAS Diagnostic and Prevention Network, the FAS Facial Photographic Analysis software, the Diagnostic Guide for FASD, the national FASD Interdisciplinary Diagnostic Training Program, and the Foster Care FAS Screening/Diagnostic/Surveillance Program. A brief synopsis of each research project is provided below. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Database / Registry - (The FAS DPN) Dr. Astley and others at the University of Washington maintain a comprehensive, confidential database on all patients evaluated at the FAS DPN with patient consent and University of Washington and WA State Human Subjects Review Board approval. The data allows the FAS DPN to: (1) Track regional demand for services and diagnostic outcomes over time. (2) Develop new state-of-the-art screening and diagnostic tools. And (3) Support intervention research that could directly benefit patients and their families. FASD Facial Photographic Analysis - The FAS DPN Photographic Image Analysis Laboratory provides computerized facial photographic analysis for research teams around the world. The photographic archive contains over 10,000 digital facial photographs. FASD MRI / MRS/ fMRI Research - The FAS DPN is funded by NIAAA to conduct MRI/MRS/fMRI studies on children with prenatal alcohol exposure and the full continuum of mild to severe central nervous system dysfunction. This project uses magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and functional MRI (fMRI)) to determine if prenatally alcohol-exposed children, with and without FAS, who present along the full continuum of mild to severe CNS dysfunction, have irrefutable evidence of organic brain damage in the form of chemical and structural alterations. FASD Intervention Research - The FAS DPN is currently funded by the CDC to evaluate the effectiveness of two interventions targeted to children with the full spectrum of disorders associated with prenatal alcohol exposure, and their families. The research addresses an important clinical need by refining and testing two promising intervention models for school-aged children with FAS/ARND that are built on published "clinical wisdom," nine years of FAS diagnostic clinic experience, pilot intervention studies, and selected empirically-supported child treatment techniques: (1) An individualized, supportive, behavioral consultation intervention for parents and school staff of children with FAS/ARND; and (2) A school-based social communication intervention provided directly to children with FAS/ARND that targets critical deficits in social communication and peer relations. These interventions will be assessed through two randomized control trials on a total of 128 children with FAS/ARND.Dr. Astley is lead instructor of a course entitled “Methods of Applied Community Research”

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Colleen Huebner, PhD

Dr. Huebner is Associate Professor of Health Services and Director of the MCHB-sponsored Maternal and Child Health Training Grant. As a developmental psychologist and epidemiologist, Dr. Huebner's research concerns pediatric health issues, including prevention of childhood disabilities such a language and intellectual delays and maternal health promotion. Dr. Huebner's research centers on prevention of childhood morbidities associated with social and economic disadvantage through studies designed to elucidate the social bases of language, cognitive development and emotional development in typically developing and at-risk children. The primary focus of her work is the design and evaluation of home and clinic-based interventions that promote development in the infant and preschool years, and programs to reduce the incidence of child maltreatment. A second area of research includes devising and testing epidemiological methods and measures to monitor the health and well-being of school-age children and adolescents, with and without disabilities. A pending project involves an analysis of one year of Medicaid claims data for oral health services provided to pregnant and non-pregnant female residents of the State of Oregon. Dr. Huebner is lead instructor of the required topic course in the MCH program.

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Victoria L. Holt, PhD, MPH

Dr. Holt is Professor of Epidemiology and Member at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Her research and teaching interests span the range of topics that are highly relevant to the RPPE Training Program. Dr. Holt's primary research interests are in the areas of reproductive epidemiology and intimate partner violence. Recent reproductive epidemiology research projects include the impact of oral contraceptive use on ovarian cyst formation, the epidemiology of adenomyosis and endometriosis (with emphasis on reproductive and contraceptive risk factors), and the association between body mass index and oral contraceptive failure. Dr. Holt participates in several research projects concerning intimate partner violence through the Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center. Recent violence-related projects concern the associations between violence during pregnancy and adverse infant outcomes, the effect of protection orders on future intimate partner violence, and the impact of the justice system response to partner violence on the risk of subsequent violence and injury. Dr. Holt is the lead instructor for a course entitled “Reproductive Epidemiology”.

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Beth Mueller, DrPH, MPH

Dr. Mueller is Professor of Epidemiology and Member at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Her research and teaching interests span the range of topics that are highly relevant to the proposed training program, including the epidemiology of perinatal and reproductive diseases; cancer; and injury research. The health of women and their offspring are uniquely linked, and this relationship has served as the focus for most of the work Dr. Mueller’s work. A woman's general health status, and in particular, her exposures during pregnancy, may result in in-utero conditions that are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, malformations, or cancer in her offspring. This association works in both directions, however, in that a woman's own reproductive and childbearing experiences impact her future health in ways we are just beginning to understand. Dr. Mueller is currently studying risk factors for pedestrian-automobile collision injuries to children, factors associated with motor vehicle collisions, evaluating the effects of alcohol intoxication on outcome of head injury, and methods-based research evaluating some of the tools used in injury research such as data linkages, clinical protocols for diagnosis of injury, and tools used to conduct assessments of driver sobriety. Dr. Mueller is also engaged in studies evaluating pregnancy exposures and maternal characteristics and various pregnancy and birth outcomes including malformations, prematurity, and low birthweight. She teaches data analysis techniques for epidemiologic studies to graduate students as part of the core epidemiology curriculum (EPI 514) annually.

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Melissa A. Schiff, MD, MPH

Dr. Schiff is Professor of Epidemiology. Dr. Schiff has several ongoing projects primarily focusing on maternal health and injury. One project is evaluating the effects of unintentional injury on pregnancy using linked databases. The project assesses the pattern of injuries from motor vehicle crashes and falls and their effects on pregnancy outcomes. A second project is evaluating postpartum suicide risk factors including obstetric and psychiatric factors. A third project assesses risk factors for sports injuries in girls with a focus on soccer and gymnastics.

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David Yanez, PhD

Dr. Yanez is Associate Professor of Biostatistics, his research projects primarily focus on analytical methods for randomized clinical trials and longitudinal epidemiological studies. Dr. Yanez teaches several Biostatistics courses in the core curriculum for doctoral and masters degree students in the Epidemiology and Biostatisitcs. He is a committee member on thesis and doctoral dissertation committees for students in the Epidemiology Department. He is also the Director of the Graduate Program in the Department of Biostatistics

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Melissa A. Austin, PhD

Dr. Austin is a Professor of Epidemiology, Associate Dean of the Graduate School, Adjunct Professor of Department of Medicine and Medical History & Ethics. Dr. Austin's research program focuses on the genetic epidemiology of cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and familial forms of cancer. Her current, NIH-funded projects include two large-scale family studies investigating the familial forms of hyperlipidemia and genetics of risk factors for coronary heart disease and diabetes in the Japanese American Community. Her laboratory-based collaborations involve examining lipoprotein subfractions as risk factors for these diseases. She also serves as Director of the Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) core of the Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health. In her role as director of the Institute for Public Health Genetics, Dr. Austin leads a multidisciplinary team of faculty members from seven different schools and colleges that form the IPHG, funded by the University Initiative Fund at the UW. She oversees academic affairs for IPHG, including the MPH in Public Health Genetics, the new M.S. in Genetic Epidemiology, and the new Ph.D. in Public Health Genetics; and partnerships with public health agencies including the Washington State Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dr. Austin was on a sabbatical in England during 2001 with support from the International Atherosclerosis Society and the Department of Epidemiology. During that time, she was an Honorary Visiting Fellow at the University of Cambridge attached to the Public Health Genetics Unit, and was a Visiting Professor at the Centre for Cardiovascular Genetics at University College London. Dr. Austin teaches EPI517/PHG511, Genetic Epidemiology during Winter Quarter.

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Shirley Beresford, PhD

Dr. Beresford is co-Principal Investigator and Project Director on an active R01 grant from NIDDK. The specific aims of this project are to 1) evaluate whether an endurance exercise program is associated with lower risk of gallbladder disease in overweight pregnant women; 2) evaluate whether an endurance exercise intervention program changes leptin levels in pregnancy among overweight women; and 3) use statistical methods to examine the associations between gallbladder disease incidence and levels of leptin, HDL, insulin levels, and BMI in this prospective trial. This study builds on the previous grant by the same team, that explored the incidence, risk factors and natural history of sludge and gallstones during pregnancy. Gallbladder sludge and stones are common in pregnancy, particularly among those women with high body mass index, high leptin levels, high insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. This funded study involves a randomized trial of pregnant women recruited from Madigan Army Hospital in Tacoma early in their first trimester of pregnancy. The intervention program, given to participants randomized to that group, starts at about week 15 of pregnancy and runs through the third trimester. The participants randomized to the comparison group are provided an exercise program post-partum. Interview data include information on diet and physical activity. Sonographic evaluation of the gallbladder and biliary system is performed at 10-12 weeks, 18 weeks, and 26-28 weeks gestation. Serum glucose, lipid, insulin and leptin levels are obtained at 10-12 weeks, 26-28 weeks and 34-36 weeks. Planned extensions of this line of research include comparisons of maternal and fetal adiposity in the intervention and comparison groups, and additional exploration of the relationship between dyslipidemia in pregnancy and pre-eclampsia, obesity-metabolic syndrome and possible predictors of future obesity among children. Research opportunities for pre- and post-doctoral fellows could include evaluation of: (1) Maternal medical complications, disease prevention, and health promotion; (2) Maternal diet and physical activity in relation to maternal health and fetal outcomes; (3) Pregnancy outcomes related to maternal biological markers; and (4) Fetal and neonatal health and disease.

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Harvey Checkoway, PhD

Dr. Checkoway is Professor of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, Occupational & Environmental Medicine and Epidemiology. Dr. Checkoway is Director of the UW Superfund Basic Research Program Project. His main areas of research and teaching are occupational and environmental risk factors for chronic diseases. Recent examples of research projects for which he is principal investigator are studies of: silica, silicosis, and lung cancer among diatomaceous earth industry workers; semen quality among lead smelter workers; environmental and genetic risk factors for Parkinson's disease; parkinsonism in relation to pesticide exposures among orchardists; and cancer risks among textile workers in Shanghai. Dr. Checkoway teaches a course in Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology (ENVH/EPI 570).

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Scott Davis, PhD

Dr. Davis is Professor and Chairman of the Department of Epidemiology in the School of Public Health and Community Medicine at the University of Washington and a Full Member in the Program in Epidemiology of the Division of Public Health Sciences at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. His primary research focus is radiation epidemiology. For more than a decade he has directed two major research activities investigating the effects of ionizing radiation on human health. One is a series of studies in the Russian Federation of the effects of radiation exposure from the Chernobyl Power Station. These studies have focused on the risk of thyroid cancer and leukemia among children in the Bryansk Oblast, and recently have expanded to include the molecular characterization of thyroid cancer cases. Efforts are underway to further expand these studies to investigate the occurrence of stillbirths and congenital malformations. The second is a long-term follow up study of thyroid disease in persons exposed to atmospheric releases of radiation from the Hanford Nuclear Site in eastern Washington State (the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study). He has conducted several epidemiologic studies of the possible health effects associated with exposure to power frequency magnetic fields, focusing on the risk of leukemia and breast cancer. Recently this work has expanded to include investigations of the effects of exposure to light-at-night and circadian disruption, including night shift work, on melatonin and reproductive hormones important in the etiology of breast and other hormone-related cancer.

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Karen Edwards, PhD

Dr. Edwards is Associate Professor of Epidemiology. Dr. Karen Edwards is a member of the core faculty in the Institute of Public Health Genetics. She is also the Director of the UW Center for Genomics and Public Health, one of only three Centers in the U.S. The goals of the new Center are to integrate advances in genetic technology into public health practice and to offer research and educational opportunities for public health students and professionals. Dr. Edwards also coordinates the new degree track in genetic epidemiology, as a joint effort between the Institute for Public Health Genetics and the Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics. Her primary research interest is in the area of genetic epidemiology, particularly diabetes and the insulin resistance syndrome (IRS). Her work currently involves defining multivariate phenotypes for complex diseases and then using these phenotypes for mapping studies of diabetes and the IRS. She is also interested in interactions between environmental factors (diet) and genetic susceptibility to complex disease. Dr. Edwards currently teaches EPI518/PHG518 "Computer Applications in Genetic Epidemiology" offered in the Spring Quarter, and is a co-instructor for EPI517/PHG511 "Genetic Epidemiology" offered in the Winter Quarter.

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Daniel Enquobahrie, PHD, MPH, MD

Dr. Enquobahrie is Assistant Professor of Epidemiology and Associate Director of the Center for Perinatal Studies, Swedish Medical Center. He is also an investigator with the Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, University of Washington. His primary research interests are cardiovascular and perinatal epidemiology, developmental origins, genetic and molecular epidemiology (transcription and post-transcription regulation) and international research. Dr. Enquobahrie currently teaches EPI521/HSERV 542 "Epidemiology of Maternal and Child Health Problems" offered in the Winter Quarter.

Elaine Faustman, PhD

Dr. Faustman is Professor of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences; Toxicology Program Director, Institute for Risk Analysis and Risk Communication; UW Director , Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research, UW; UW Co-Principal Investigator, Pacific Northwest Center for Human Health and Ocean Studies; UW Principal Investigator, Center for the Study and Improvement of Regulation (CSIR). Dr. Faustman’s current research projects include neurodevelopmental toxicity of metals and pesticides, pesticide exposure and toxicity in children, risk management and regulation, and risk management and risk communication. She teaches ENVH 532 Reproductive & Development Toxicology, ENVH 577 Risk Assessment for Environmental Hazards, and ENVH 593 Current Topics in Risk Assessment.

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Annette Fitzpatrick, PhD

Dr. Fitzpatrick has worked in the field of epidemiologic research for over 16 years at the University of Washington, initially as a Research Scientist for the Department of Biostatistics, and now as Research Faculty in the Epidemiology Department. Although her work has focused primarily on studies of aging, she considers Epidemiology to be a multidisciplinary field. Over the years, she has been involved in studies in the areas of cancer, health services, genetics and infectious disease as well as in reproductive health. Dr. Fitzpatrick has worked with Dr. Williams for several years as a core faculty in the Multidisciplinary International Research Training Program. She offers a seminar to fellows each year introducing them to epidemiological concepts and data analyses.

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Jacqueline Gardner , PhD

Dr. Gardner is a Professor of Pharmacy. She is currently PI of a Community Pharmacy Program that seeks to assess the feasibility of community pharmacists directly initiating and managing hormonal contraceptive methods for women through use of collaborative drug therapy agreements (CDTA)

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Christine Gleason, PhD

Dr. Gleason's research focuses on the effects of drugs on the developing brain. She is currently using a fetal sheep model to study the effects of fetal alcohol exposure on regulation of brain blood flow. Most research on fetal alcohol syndrome has focused on alcohol's many neurotoxic effects. However, heavy alcohol use in adults increases the risk for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases (such as stroke). Gleason theorizes that alcohol may affect developing brain blood vessels as well. The goal of her research is to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms for alcohol's detrimental effects on the developing brain. She has also embarked on a new series of studies, using developing rats, on the cerebrovascular effects of chronic neonatal narcotic exposure later in life. Critically ill newborn infants are often treated with narcotics such as morphine for pain management and sedation. While the short-term benefits of this therapy may be clear, the potential long-term side effects are not known. The overall goal of these new studies is to provide a better rationale for neonatal therapeutics-weighing both the risks and the benefits, short- and long-term-in order to optimize neonatal outcomes.

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Therese Grant, PhD

Dr. Grant is principal investigator of the Parent-Child Assistance Program (P-CAP), an award-winning intervention model working with high-risk mothers who abuse alcohol and drugs during pregnancy. The Parent-Child Assistance Program (PCAP), originally known as the Seattle Birth to 3 Project, began in 1991 as a 5-year federally funded research demonstration project designed to test the efficacy of a model of intensive, long-term paraprofessional advocacy with high-risk mothers who abuse alcohol or drugs heavily during pregnancy and are estranged from community service providers. The primary goal of the program is a straightforward one -- to prevent alcohol and drug exposure among the future children of these mothers. Dr. Grant's research focuses on perinatal substance abuse and the effects of prenatal exposure to drugs and alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome, development of assessment instruments and intervention strategies, as well as the challenges of community intervention and prevention with high-risk mothers and their children.

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Nancy L. Haigwood, PhD

Dr. Haigwood has been and continues to be an important faculty for Epidemiology students seeking to increase their knowledge in the areas of immunology and pathobiology. The research in the Haigwood laboratory aims to understand the role of antiviral immunity in controlling and ultimately preventing infection and disease. Her focus in recent years has shifted to infants and the role that maternal neutralizing antibodies, acquired transplacentally and via breastmilk, could play in limiting infection in the newborns. In all of the three grants listed below, the emphasis is on developing novel approaches to limit infection by vaccination or therapy. The R01 is most applicable to projects that seek to understand the role of infectious diseases (HIV in particular) on maternal and child health disease prevention and health promotion and on determinants of pregnancy outcomes. The R01 and R21 are both applicable to novel vaccine approaches that can be used in adolescents, pregnancy, and newborns and infants.

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Patrick Heagerty, PhD

Dr. Heagerty is Professor of Biostatistics with research interests in regression techniques for dependent data, including marginal models and random effects models for longitudinal data, methods for categorical time series, and hierarchical models for categorical spatial data, statistical computing and applications in epidemiology and ecology. His teaching interests include longitudinal data, introductory biostatistics, and advanced methods.

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Dick Hoskins, PhD, MPH

Dr. Hoskins is Senior Epidemiologist, Washington, State Department of Health and Clinical Associate Professor in Epidemiology, UWSPHCM. He is currently pursuing a geographic distribution and cluster study of infant death, low birth weight, and fetal death throughout Washington State between 1989 through 2003. He is characterizing neighborhoods with the aim of assessing what socioeconomic factors in neighborhoods may contribute to untoward birth and perinatal outcomes. Additionally, he is conducting a statewide study of clustering and geographic distribution of childhood cancers. Dr. Hoskins has been an important resource to those students and faculty who have worked to integrate GIS methodologies in their research. He is currently teaching a course on the basic principles of GIS that would be of interest to RPPE trainees.

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Catherine Karr, MD, PhD, MS

Catherine Karr is a board certified pediatrician with a doctorate degree in Epidemiology and Masters in Environmental Health/Toxicology. Her research activities address environmental contaminants and pediatric respiratory health including asthma, farmworker child health, and health of children in lower resourced countries. She is a co-investigator with the Pacific Northwest Center of the National Children's Study and the UW based Center for Children's Environmental Health Research. She leads a global children's environmental health training initiative with trainees in South East Asia. As Director of the UW based NW Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit, she sets the direction of the Unit for outreach and education as well as responding to queries from health care providers, government officials and families regarding health risks associated with environmental exposures. She also continues to practice primary care pediatrics in the UW Medicine system.

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Ann Marie Kimball, MD, MPH

Dr. Kimball is Professor of Epidemiology and Health Services. Dr. Kimball also directs the APEC Emerging Infections Network, and the Fogarty International Scholars program in Health Informatics. She serves on the International Faculty Council of the University. Her research interests include Epidemiology; HIV/AIDS; Emerging Infections, Maternal and Child Health; County and local public health; Surveillance and control of emerging infections; International Trade and Public Health Policy; and Global Health. Dr. Kimball teaches HSERV 536 Emerging Infections of International Public Health Importance and HSERV 536 (Extended MPH Program) Emerging Infections of International Public Health Importance.

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Irena King, PhD

Dr. King is Staff Scientist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and Lecturer of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Nutritional Sciences. Her research interests include fatty acids, antioxidants, DNA damage, and biomarkers.

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Jane Koenig , PhD

Dr. Koenig's main research interest is the respiratory and cardiac health effects of air pollution and especially the responses of individuals judged to be susceptible, such as persons with asthma or other chronic respiratory diseases. She has studied associations between wood smoke and lung function in young children and associations between emergency room visits for asthma and particulate matter air pollution in Seattle. Dr. Koenig is the director of a new EPA Northwest Research Center for Particulate Air Pollution and Health as of June 1999. The objective for the Center is to evaluate unique components of particulate matter in Western States and to test for association with health outcomes. Dr. Koenig's current research activities fall into three general areas which are designed to address the respiratory risks of air pollutants: (1) Controlled laboratory studies using human subjects; (2) Field or epidemiological studies evaluating respiratory health in populations exposed to fine particulate matter from wood smoke or other sources in their neighborhoods; and (3) assessment of physiologic, biochemical or morphological changes in cultured human epithelial cells after air pollutant exposure.

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Thomas Koepsell, MD, MPH

Dr. Koepsell is Professor of Epidemiology and Health Services, and Adjunct Professor of the Department of Medicine. Dr. Koepsell's research interests include the epidemiology of non-infectious diseases, principally those of the nervous, cardiovascular, and musculoskeletal systems; injury epidemiology; applications of epidemiologic study designs in health services and clinical research; and epidemiologic methods. Research currently in progress includes studies on the prevention of firearm injuries in rural Alaska, risk factors for narcolepsy, etiology and prognosis of Alzheimer’ disease, developing the VA health care system as a resource for epidemiologic research, prevention of falls in older adults. Dr. Koepsell is a reviewer for a number of professional journals including Epidemiology, JAMA, American Journal of Epidemiology, New England Journal of Medicine, Injury Prevention, and Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. His teaching interests include epidemiologic methods (EPI 512, Epidemiologic Methods I and EPI 513, Epidemiologic Methods II), and thesis and dissertation advising.

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Andrea LaCroix, PhD, MPH

Dr. LaCroix's principal research interests are in older women's health focusing specifically on prevention of osteoporosis, fractures, disability, falls, and cardiovascular disease. Areas of current emphasis include randomized trials testing the ability of several medications (thiazide diuretics, alendronate, HRT) to reduce risk of osteoporosis and fractures, and designing and evaluating state-of-the-art preventive services programs for older women in managed care settings. In addition, she is Co-Project Director of the Clinical Coordinating Center for the Women's Health Initiative and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

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Charlotte W. Lewis, MD, MPH

Dr. Lewis is attending physician at Seattle Children's Hospital, Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine and adjunct faculty of the Division of Craniofacial Medicine. Her primary research interest is disparities in health and health care access, with a specific focus on oral health and access to dental care. Her research has involved documenting disparities in access to oral health services for low-income and special needs children as well as developing and evaluating strategies to improve pediatric oral health through expanded pediatrician and family physician involvement in these areas.

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Thomas Lumley, PhD

Dr. Lumley is Associate Professor of Biostatistics. His research interests include correlated data regression, clinical trials, statistical computing and graphics, while his teaching interests are data analysis, regression methods, data visualization, design-based analysis, and mathematical statistics.

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Lisa E. Manhart, PhD, MPH

Dr. Manhart is Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology. Currently she is collaborating with the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. She has a contract for data management and analysis for Waves I, I, and III of this nationally representative sample of adolescents and young adults in the United States. The Add Health data represent a wealth of epidemiologic information on reproductive and adolescent health, and could serve as the basis for several analytic training experiences for Reproductive, Perinatal and Pediatric Epidemiology Fellows.

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Diane P. Martin, PhD

Dr. Martin is a Professor of Health Services and Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology. Her research interests are health insurance and delivery systems, changing behavior of patients and providers to improve quality of care and outcomes, research methods, and health services organization and financing. She teaches research methods in health services and dissemination of research results.

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Mary Anne Mercer, DrPH, MPH

Dr. Mercer is a Senior Lecturer of Health Services and has been a member of the faculty since 1996 and is affiliated with the International Health Track, (MPH program) and the Maternal and Child Health Track, (MPH program). She specializes in maternal and child health in developing countries. Dr. Mercer was on the faculty of the International Health Department at Johns Hopkins University from 1981- 1994 where she directed a technical support program for HIV/AIDS prevention in Africa, and later was Deputy Director of the PVO Child Survival NGO Support Program. Dr. Mercer is also Deputy Director of Health Alliance International, an international health non-profit organization based in Seattle. She is involved in projects in Mozambique and East Timor. Dr. Mercer teaches Maternal and Child Health in Developing Countries at the University of Washington.

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Katherine Newton, PhD

Dr. Newton is Affiliate Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Associate Scientific Investigator of Group Health Cooperative, Center for Health Studies. Dr. Newton is a chronic disease epidemiologist, whose research program is focused on mid-life women's health issues, including menopause, hormone replacement therapy, cardiovascular disease in women, and diabetes.

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Bruce Psaty, MD, PhD

Dr. Psaty is a Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology, and Adjunct Professor of Health Services. His research interests include cardiovascular epidemiology, pharmacoepidemiology epidemiologic methods, patient-physician interaction, and pharmacogenetics. Dr. Psaty currently co-teaches EPI 519 Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Disease.

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Gayle Reiber, PhD, MPH

Dr. Reiber is Professor of Epidemiology and Health Services. Her research includes prevention and treatment of diabetes and lower extremity complications and diabetes self-care and enhancement programs. Dr. Reiber is a VA Career Scientist and is active in VA pre and postdoctoral training programs. The two courses taught by Dr. Reiber are Health Services Research Methods and Grantwriting. Dr. Reiber actively mentors students in epidemiology and health services, and has also been involved in State, National and International Diabetes Program Planning initiatives.

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Jane Rees, PhD, RD, CD

Dr. Rees is a Lecturer in Pediatrics and Adjunct Lecturer in Health Services. Her research interests include nutrition in maternal and child health, adolescent health, eating disorders and pregnancy in adolescents. Dr. Rees teaches courses in nutrition health.

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Frederick Rivara, MD, MPH

Dr. Rivara is Director of the Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center (HIPRC). Dr. Rivara's research is currently focused on childhood precursors to adult disease and prevention of the major causes of death in the United States through interventions in childhood and adolescence. These include problems of smoking, violence, alcohol related mortality, obesity and physical inactivity. There are many opportunities for trainees interested in pediatric epidemiological research to work with Dr. Rivera and colleagues at the HIPRC.

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Delia Scholes, PhD, MS

Dr. Scholes is a Senior Investigator at the Group Health Cooperative, Center for Health Studies and Affiliate Professor of Epidemiology. Her research interests focus principally on the health issues of young women, including STD/HIV prevention and contraceptive options. She is currently the principal investigator for an NIH-funded prospective study of the effects of Depo-provera and other risk factors on bone density in adolescent and young adult women.

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Kirkwood Shy, MD,MPH

Dr. Shy is a Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology. His research interests include women's health care, general obstetrics and gynecology and gynecologic surgery.

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David Siscovick, MD,MPH

Dr. Siscovick is Professor of Epidemiology and Co-Director of the Center for Cardiovascular Research Unit. He is also Director of the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Training Program. His research, although primarily focused on cardiovascular disorder in adults, dove-tails well with epidemiological, endocrinological and immunological disciplines that are pertinent to understanding vascular and other metabolic disorders of pregnancy. Drs. Siscovick has been working with Dr. Williams and others in reproductive epidemiology (e.g., Susan Harlap and Matthew Gillman) to expand the Jerusalem Cohort for study of perinatal antecedents to adult disorders including metabolic syndrome and atherosclerotic disease. Dr. Siscovick and Psaty are instructors of the Cardiovascular Epidemiology course which all RPPE trainees with an interest in maternal medical complications of pregnancy (e.g., preeclampsia and gestational diabetes) will be encouraged to take.

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Jacqueline R. Starr, PhD, MS, MPH

Dr. Starr is a Research Assistant Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Epidemiology. Her research interests include craniofacial malformations, maternal genetics in relation to offspring disease risk, molecular epidemiology, epidemiologic methods, testicular cancer.

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Andreas Stergachis, PhD

Dr. Stergachis is Professor of Epidemiology and Adjunct Professor of Pharmacy. His research interests are pharmacoepidemiology and the epidemiology of biological and chemical hazards. Through his affiliation with the Northwest Center for Public Health Practice, he focuses on education, training and research in emergency preparedness with the public health and clinical practice community. He is also affiliated with the Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research and Policy program. His current research includes studies of adverse events associated with biologics and other types of pharmaceuticals. He has served on NIH's Epidemiology and Disease Control Study Section, AHRQ Health Systems Research Study Section and the Institute of Medicine's Committee on Poison Prevention and Control. Dr. Stergachis teaches courses in pharmacoepidemiology and the epidemiology of biological and chemical hazards

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Ann Vander Stoep, PhD, MS

Dr. Stoep is a child psychiatric epidemiologist and is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and of Epidemiology. Her research interests include: developmental epidemiology of adolescent depression, mental health status of children in the juvenile justice system, transition to adulthood for adolescents with psychiatric disorders, development of children’s mental health interventions, and participatory action research. Dr. Vander Stoep, is PI on the Developmental Pathways Program, a collaborative effort with the Seattle Public Schools, whose goals are to understand the etiology of childhood depression and to develop effective strategies for preventing this prevalent and debilitating illness and its sequelea. Dr. Vander Stoep teaches a course in Psychosocial Epidemiology in the School of Public Health each spring and provides research mentorship to epidemiology graduate students and junior scientists in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.

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Noel Weiss, MD, DrPH

Dr. Weiss is Professor of Epidemiology. His research interest is primarily in the area of cancer epidemiology. Part of his time is devoted to the study of epidemiologic methods and of the application of these methods to the understanding of the determinants of the outcome of illness. Dr. Weiss currently co-teaches the introductory series EPI 512 Epidemiologic Methods I in Autumn Quarter and EPI 513 Epidemiologic Methods II in Winter Quarter, and teaches EPI 542 Clinical Epidemiology offered in Summer Quarter.

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Marcia Williams, PhD, MPH

Dr. Williams is Senior Lecturer of Epidemiology and Adjunct Senior Lecturer of Rehabilitation Medicine. She is a pediatric physical therapist. Her research focuses on early identification of neuromotor abnormalities in preterm infants, as well as the developmental consequences of in utero cocaine exposure. Specific projects include etiology of cerebral palsy in low birth weight infants, effects of prenatal exposure to methamphetamine on the developmental outcome of children, and risk factors for clubfoot deformity in infants. Dr. Williams has been a guest lecturer in both the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and the Department of Epidemiology. She has taught Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology and co-teaches Epidemiology 592C (Maternal and Child Health Research Seminar) and Epidemiology 521S (Epidemiology of Material and Child Health Problems).

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Last modified: December 15, 2011