Team Seagrass


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Sandy Wyllie-Echeverria, Ph.D.

Research Scientist at UW Friday Harbor Labs and College of Forest Resources, UW Botanic Gardens, Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Victoria, and Part-time faculty at the University of the Virgin Islands, Dr. Sandy Wyllie-Echeverria’s strong interest in the connection between botanical observation and evolutionary development fuels his research projects in seagrass ecology, reproductive ecology and ethnobotany. For nearly three decades this interest has taken him to sites throughout the Northeastern Pacific, Northern Atlantic and Mediterranean.

 
 

Michael Hannam, Ph.D.

Michael completed his Ph.D. in June 2013 and is now working as a Postdoctoral Research Associate for the School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences and the Washington Department of Natural Resources. His dissertation work focused on how Z. marina and Z. japonica interactions were influenced by different scales of environmental context, and his current postdoctoral work addresses different aspects of adaptive management of seagrass in the Puget Sound.

 
 
 

Frederick (Ricky) Dooley – Ph.D. Student

Ricky Dooley is investigating the processes of breaking dormancy in Zostera marina, i.e. what causes germination, and what physiological mechanisms are involved (hormones, permeability, environmental factors, etc.) He is also interested in the physiological responses of Z. marina to different stresses, particularly exposure to hydrogen sulfide.

 
 
 

Ginger Shoemaker, Ph.D.

Ginger graduated from UW with her PhD in Dec 2010. She currently works for the Washington State Department of Natural Resources as an aquatic botanist. For the DNR, she is participating in a state-wide Zostera marina monitoring project designed to measure the natural interannual variability in eelgrass shoot density, shoot length and areal coverage along the upper edge of its distribution throughout Puget Sound and the outer coast estuaries. She is also interested in kelp distributions in Washington.

 

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Kristy Kull

Kristy Kull worked for the Seagrass Lab on projects with the National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey. These investigations included monitoring water conditions at the National Parks on either end of San Juan Island and in marine lagoons, as well as tracking seasonal growth rates in experimental seagrass plants. She now works at FHL in other capacities.

 
 
 

Nobuharu Inaba

Nobuharu Inaba – Ph.D. Student

Nobuharu Inaba is Ph.D. candidate in Marine Biology and Environmental Science in the Graduate School of Fisheries Sciences at Hokkaido University,Japan. He has been working on bio-control of harmful algal blooms, using bacteria associated with seagrass beds. His main field of study for his M.S and Ph.D focuses on seagrass beds in Puget Sound. He has also been invited to participate in joint research funded by the United States Department of Agriculture.

 
 
 

Graham Crawbuck – Spring Street International School

Graham Crawbuck is a student at the George Washington University in Washington, DC, studying Spanish and Public Health with a pre-medical concentration. He graduated from Spring Street International School in Friday Harbor, WA in 2013 after traveling to India, Thailand, Morocco, and Spain through school provided programming. During his time in Friday Harbor, he started working at the UW Friday Harbor Labs with Dr. Wyllie-Echeverria, focusing on the study of Zostera marina and the pathogen Labyrinthula. His work in the Seagrass Lab inspired him to continue pursuing scientific research, and he hopes to go onto medical school, focusing on studying emerging infectious diseases and epidemiology.

 
 
 

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Katie Harrington – Lab Assistant

Katie Harrington is contributing a bibliometric report on the state of literature regarding algicidal bacterias associated with seagrasses in the Salish Sea waters. In partnership with the National Park Service, she’s also contributing to an ongoing, long-term water quality analysis of five sites in the San Juan Archipelago, analyzing seasonal changes in the water column environments. As a part of this lab, she’s enjoyed learning how ethnobotanical and cultural values can significantly improve conservation efforts.