Willapa Bay, Washington

UW Sediment Dynamics Group

People

Faculty

Chuck Nittrouer

Chuck Nittrouer

Chuck's research interests include the modern and ancient formation of sedimentary strata in continental margin environments, and the effects of physical and biological oceanic processes on sedimentary characteristics. He obtained his Ph.D in Geological Oceanography at the University of Washington in 1978 and returned to join the UW faculty in 1998.

Contact: nittroue@ocean.washington.edu

Andrea Ogston

Andrea Ogston

Andrea Ogston was drawn to the study of sediment transport while driving past mud flats, walking along beaches with crashing waves, and sailing across river plumes laden with sediment. She obtained her undergraduate degree in Civil Engineering at Oregon State University, and after a few years in environmental consulting she returned to academia for graduate study in Oceanography. Since joining the faculty in the School of Oceanography in 2000, she has focused her research on the interaction between geological and physical oceanography of the coastal ocean, using observational techniques to study the dispersal of sediment from river to deep sea.

CV; Publications

Contact: ogston@ocean.washington.edu

 

Graduate Students

Dan Nowacki

Dan Nowacki

Dan came to the UW in 2008 after a stint at the U.S. Geological Survey's National Research Program, where he studied flow and transport in the Florida Everglades. His undergraduate degree is from Syracuse University, and he completed his M.S.E. in Civil & Environmental Engineering at the UW in 2010, where he investigated sediment transport in and removal from the Columbia River plume. He's now pursuing his Ph.D. in Oceanography, studying sediment transport and fluid mechanics in various tidally influenced environments, including tidal flats and large tidal rivers. Apart from research, he enjoys traveling to South America, hiking the North Cascades, and working on his 22-year-old Toyota Land Cruiser.

CV; Website

Contact: nowacki@uw.edu

Aaron Fricke

Aaron Fricke

Aaron graduated from Carleton College in 2009 with a degree in Geology. After a year spent living and working in Chile, Aaron joined the School of Oceanography at UW in 2010. He is interested in understanding modern sedimentary processes and deposits in order to better understand ancient sedimentary systems. Aaron's master's work focuses on sedimentation in Lake Chelan, in the North Cascades of Washington state. His work on Lake Chelan examines deltaic dynamics and coupled fluvial-lacustrine sedimentation associated with the Stehekin River. In his free time Aaron enjoys hiking, B&W photography, travel, and working on old (<$1000) cars.

Contact: atfricke@uw.edu

Emily Eidam

Emily Eidam

Emily became interested in marine sediment transport while completing degrees in Geology and Civil Engineering at the University of Alaska Anchorage, and while hiking around the tidal flats of Cook Inlet near Anchorage. She joined the University of Washington School of Oceanography in 2011 and is studying fine-grained sediment motion and seabed formation offshore of the Elwha River following dam removal, and also offshore of the Mekong River. Outside of school Emily enjoys hiking and photography.

Contact: efe@uw.edu

Robin Banner

Robin Banner

Robin Banner received her BS in Geology from the College of Charleston in South Carolina, a coastal university that facilitated her interests in human-ocean interactions. Her undergraduate research and thesis focused on the coastal sediment dynamics of Folly Beach, SC in response to beach renourishment and groin installation. After graduating from the College of Charleston, Robin worked for the South Carolina Geological Survey. There, she worked on the Broad River Basin Project and studied sediment transport and erosion mitigation efforts in many small rivers. In 2014, Robin came to the University of Washington to continue her research in coastal sediment dynamics, particularly in response to anthropogenic alteration and climate change. She is currently studying sediment dynamics of the Mekong Delta in Vietnam. In her free time, Robin enjoys being outside, scuba diving, hiking, and reading.

Contact: efe@uw.edu

 

Research Scientists

Daniel Culling

Daniel Culling

Profile coming soon

 

Visiting Students

Suzan Pequeño

Suzan Pequeño

Suzan is a PhD student at the Federal University of Para (UFPA) in Brazil in the Marine Geology and Geochemistry Graduate Program. She is currently participating in the PDSE program as a visiting student at the UW School of Oceanography. Her current work includes processing mud samples from the Coreau estuary in northeastern Brazil, in order to determine accumulation rate and particle size. Her graduate work is entitled "Recognizing coastal environments by remote sensing," and focuses on the morphologic estuary evolution of the Coreau River estuary in northeastern Brazil over three time scales. In her free time, she loves reading, hiking, rowing, and boxing.

Contact: suzan@ufpa.br

Wenhua Gao

Wenhua Gao

Wenhua is from Nanjing University in China and came to the UW as a visiting student for one year, from September 2013 to September 2014. She is now pursuing her Ph.D. in Marine Geology, studying sediment sources and transport in ocean. Wenhua has already carried out research on sediment and dissolved solids in alpine glacier catchments, and their relationship with climate change in northwest China, which helped her discover her interest in sediment dynamic processes. Now, her research focuses on the quantitative analysis of marine sediment sources and sediment transport rates in the southern Yellow Sea in China, using tracer methods and models. Apart from research, she enjoys traveling, photography and climbing.

Contact: gaowenhua-666@163.com

 

Undergraduate Lab Assistants

Julia Marks

Julia Marks

Julia Marks is an undergraduate student in the School of Oceanography at the University of Washington. Her interests are based in Marine Geology and Geophysics and she has had the opportunity to participate in research focusing on sediment-transport processes of various environments. Julia has worked closely with Andrea Ogston and Chuck Nittrouer for much of her undergraduate career.

Kevin Simans

Profile coming soon

Brianna Sweeney

Profile coming soon

 

 

Former Graduate Students

Kristen Lee Webster

Kristen Lee Webster

Kristen’s PhD research includes the sediment dispersal and accumulation of small deltas in Puget Sound, specifically the Elwha and Skagit River deltas. She traces sediment through the water to the seabed, using time series instruments and sediment cores. Kristen came to UW Oceanography to learn more about sediment transport after finishing her M.S. in Earth Science at the University of Maine, there she studied post glacial sea-level change in the Gulf of Maine, using seabed techniques (long cores, multibeam, seismic, and side scan) to date drowned shoreline deposits at -60 m water depth. She received her B.A. in Geosciences from Williams College and after graduating worked at the US Geological Survey in the Coastal Marine Geology Program in Menlo Park, CA. Kristen is also interested in new ways to get undergrads and GK-12 students excited about geology.

Contact: kml01@uw.edu

Katie Boldt

Katie Boldt

Katie graduated from Dartmouth College in 2008 with a degree in Earth Sciences. While there, she spent a semester with the Sea Education Association (SEA) and discovered her interest in the oceans. For her undergraduate thesis, she helped calibrate a 2000-year record of major hurricane events along the northeastern coast based on preserved layers in the sedimentary record. After a summer working for SEA, Katie headed to UW to continue studying coastal sedimentary processes and archives. Her master’s work involved relating sediment transport processes to short-and long-term sediment deposition patterns and rates in Willapa Bay, WA. For her PhD, she is working in Alaska, Patagonia, and western Antarctic Peninsula fjords to study the processes controlling the erosion, transfer and accumulation of sediment in glacial-marine environments. Besides glaciers and the ocean, Katie loves outdoor sports, running and throwing pottery.

CV; Website

Contact: kboldt@uw.edu

Rip Hale

Rip Hale

Rip graduated from Brown University in 2006, receiving a BS with Honors in Geology/Biology. His senior thesis employed coastal sediment cores to reconstruct the record of major hurricanes in the northeast US over the past 5000 years. After working as a coastal geologist for a Boston-area environmental consulting firm, Rip returned to academia in the fall of 2008 in pursuit of a masters and PhD at the UW. Rip is interested in nearshore sediment transport; specifically, linking instrument data with data from sediment cores to understand transport processes and deposition. For his masters degree, Rip used cores to study the effects of a major typhoon on sedimentation in a submarine canyon off the SW coast of Taiwan. For his PhD, Rip is studying the fate of sediment exiting the Waipaoa river in New Zealand, and what processes are responsible for transporting it along, across, and off the continental shelf. Outside of his research, Rip enjoys all-things outdoors, especially cycling, rock climbing, snowboarding, and camping.

CV

Contact: rhale@uw.edu