Seeb Lab People

Principal Investigators

Jim Seeb

Jim Seeb

Research Professor
jseeb@uw.edu
http://fish.washington.edu/jimseeb

Lisa Seeb

Lisa Seeb

Research Professor
lseeb@uw.edu
http://fish.washington.edu/lisaseeb

Affiliated Faculty

Fred Utter

Fred Utter

I am pleased to be included as an active participant in the Seeb Lab.  This represents another "failure" towards full retirement since leaving NOAA Fisheries employment early in 1988.  Maybe I'll reconsider in another five years, but for the present things are fine.  I serve on committees and mentor population genetics and writing. There's just too much potential for satisfying interactions with you good people, particularly in serving as a catalyst towards getting research published in peer-reviewed outlets.

Ken Warheit

Ken Warheit

I direct the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Molecular Genetics Laboratory in Olympia, Washington. We have many collaborative projects with the Seeb Lab, including transcriptome and RAD sequencing for SNP discovery and for genotyping-by sequencing, in Chinook, Chum, and Pink salmon and steelhead trout. One of our interests is to help develop 96-SNP arrays for fishery and hatchery management for commercially and recreationally important species in the Pacific Northwest. I sit on graduate committees and am available for guest lectures.

Post-Docs

Meredith Everett

Meredith Everett

My research interests are in how organisms interact with and adapt to their environments on a genomic scale, and how knowledge of these interactions can be applied to conservation and management solutions. My initial SNP discovery research (Everett et al. 2011) transformed to now focus on developing novel genomic maps for Pacific salmonids and using these maps to discover the genomic regions associated with ecological traits through QTL and association mapping. I am also involved in a project using SNPs to track sockeye salmon in Bristol Bay, Alaska.

Research Staff

Carita Pascal

Carita Pascal

My main interest is discovery and validation of new single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in non-model organisms.  I oversee the laboratory operations including SNP genotyping, Sanger sequencing, library preparation for next-generation sequencing, and sample and data archiving.

Ryan Waples

Ryan Waples

Ryan is a Research Scientist focusing with bioinformatics and statistical applications of RAD data. He is currently working paired populations of even- and odd-year pink salmon. Ryan splits his time between the UW and the NOAA Northwest Center Conservation Biology Division.

Graduate Students

Eleni Petrou

Eleni Petrou

I am currently researching the different historical and biological factors influencing the population structure of chum salmon in the Alaska Peninsula and Kodiak Island. More broadly, I am interested in research applicable to conservation or natural resource management and sustainability.

Sewell Young

Sewall Young

I am interested in the genomics of adaptation with an immediate focus on domestication in hatchery steelhead populations.  We are using massively parallel sequencing and analytical methods that are scaled to the data flow to study genome structure and functional expression in wild populations and hatchery populations derived from them.  We hope our results will help us to understand the dynamics of hatchery and wild components of integrated populations and develop informed strategies to improve management.

youngsfy@dfw.wa.gov

Caroline Storer

Caroline Storer

With hundreds or thousands of SNPs potentially available, there is interest in comparing and developing methods for evaluating SNPs to create panels of high-throughput assays that are customized for performance, research questions, and resources. My research in the Seeb lab has included both the development of new high-throughput SNP assays for sockeye salmon and an evaluation of different ranking methods based on SNP performance. To learn more about me and my research please visit my website at http://students.washington.edu/cgs5.

cgs5@uw.edu

Wes Larson

Wes Larson

My graduate research is focused on the use of genotyping by sequencing to acquire data from Chinook salmon populations in western Alaska; these data will provide conservation options and new insights into local adaptation. I am also interested processes influencing variation in the genes of the major histocompatibility complex.

wlarson1@uw.edu

Marissa Jones

Marissa Jones

My research focuses on genetic and ecological interactions between hatchery and wild steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Washington State. My current interests include exploring the genomic signature of adaptive evolution, adaptive trade-offs, and human-mediated evolution.

mhjones2@uw.edu

Alumni

Daniel Uchida-Gomez

Daniel Gomez–Uchida

My research goals revolve around the use of genetic and genomic data in ecology, evolution, and conservation of natural populations.  During my tenure at the Seeb lab I gathered and analyzed SNP and transcriptome data in species of Pacific salmon to elucidate how populations diverge and adapt among many discrete environments (Gomez-Uchida et al. 2011, 2012). Currently I am an assistant professor in the Department of Zoology at Universidad de Concepcion, Chile (http://www2.udec.cl/~dgomezu/).

Mortan Limborg

Morten Limborg

My research interests are within the fields of population genetics/genomics, evolution and processes of local adaptation in the wild. I have experience with salmonids and marine fishes and development of both microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genetic markers. As part of my PhD from the Technical University of Denmark I spend four inspirational months in the Seeb lab during 2010 working on a project looking at describing patterns of local adaptation in rainbow trout and steelhead (Limborg et al. 2012). I have also been an active partner in several international projects including the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme FishPopTrace (2008-2012). I plan to return to the Seeb lab to continue working on state of the art genomic projects describing key evolutionary patterns in salmonids.

Matt Smith

Matt Smith

I received an MS degree in 2010 working on a 45-year retrospective study of the sockeye salmon fishery in Bristol Bay (Smith et al. 2010; Smith et al. 2011).  I am currently a Geneticist in the Conservation Genetics Lab for the US Fish and Wildlife Service at the Abernathy Fish Technology Center.

Molly McGlauflin

Molly McGlauflin

Molly received a MS in 2010 and accepted a position as a Geneticist at the Conservation Genetics Lab, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Abernathy Fish Technology Center. She studied the influence of habitat and geography on the population structure and juvenile migration timing of sockeye salmon in Wood River Lakes in Alaska (McGlauflin et al. 2011). She also developed SNP markers for rainbow and cutthroat trout (McGlauflin et al. 2010).

Michael Ackerman

Michael Ackerman

I received my MS in 2010 focusing on a landscape genetic analysis of sockeye salmon from the Copper River, Alaska. I also examined how SNPs under diversifying selection can provide increased accuracy for  mixed-stock analysis (Ackerman et al. 2011). I currently work for the Pacific States Marine Fish Commission and am stationed at Idaho Fish and Game's Fish Genetics Lab in Eagle, Idaho. My primary project is genetic monitoring of wild steelhead and Chinook salmon at Lower Granite Dam (http://www.cbfish.org/Project.mvc/Display/2010-026-00). I'm also involved in IDFG's parental-based-tagging program that currently 'genetically tags' nearly all hatchery steelhead and Chinook salmon smolts released in the Snake River (http://www.cbfish.org/Project.mvc/Display/2010-031-00).  I am an active participant in the Snake River Basin Steelhead Run Reconstruction Team.

Lisa Creelman

Lisa Creelman Fox

Longtime Alaskan, Lisa Creelman Fox, currently works for the Gene Conservation Laboratory of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game in Anchorage.  In her 2010 Master's Thesis, she studied the population structure and outmigration timing of sockeye salmon in the Chignik River Drainage on the Alaska Peninsula (Creelman et al. 2011).