Next Week (5/20): 2015 Urban Forest Symposium

Hosted by PlantAmnesty and the UW Botanic Gardens, the 7th annual Urban Forest Symposium is coming up next Wednesday, May 20, from 8:45 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Center for Urban Horticulture (with a reception to follow from 4 to 6 p.m.).

Urban Forest SymposiumFrom providing clean water and air to supporting healthier minds and bodies, trees have significant value, but they never seem to get the credit they deserve. Attend this year’s Urban Forest Symposium, themed “For What It’s Worth: Valuing the Urban Forest,” to learn the best methods for quantifying the worth of our urban forests, and how to communicate that value to decision-makers and the public. Presenters will share the latest research on stormwater benefits and tools used to quantify them, introduce a new online portal to assist in identifying areas in cities that can have the greatest health savings through expanding tree canopy, and discuss how to leverage the multitude of benefits to engage new supporters.

Presentations will be relevant to those working in the fields of urban forestry, landscape management, policy, budget analysis, natural resources, tree care, arboricultural consulting, sustainability, urban planning, landscape design, landscape architecture, municipal management and tree advocacy.

The cost to attend the symposium is $85 per person, and lunches are available for an additional $15. Learn more and register today!

Tomorrow (5/13): CUGOS Spring Fling!

Do you care about geometry-busting workflows, brain dumping academic research, parsing vertices while flying drones, code as well as content, and usability through design? Is your skin tingling just thinking about all of this geospatial madness? Then join CUGOS tomorrow, May 13, for an all-day Spring Fling focused on all things open-source geospatial!

CUGOS, or Cascadia Users of Geospatial Open Source, is a regional chapter of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo). They are a group of developers, GIS specialists, designers and geographers all gathering under one roof in the name of maps.

Their Spring Fling, held in the Forest Club Room in Anderson Hall, is an intensely educational learning session for passionate practitioners of open-source geospatial. The day will kick off at 9 a.m., when the “geo-floodgates” will open, then leads to a series of longer talks, lightning talks, free pizza, hands-on projects and then a happy hour at the end of the day. The event is free and open to anyone, and participation is highly encouraged—especially by students!

There’s no cap on how many folks can take part, so check out the full day’s program and come join the fun!

Update: Spring Fling is under way, and there's a packed house upstairs in the Forest Club Room!

Update: Spring Fling is under way, and there’s a packed house upstairs in the Forest Club Room!

2015 Recognition Event: Honorees and Auction Results!

In case you missed the SEFS Recognition Event this past Tuesday, we celebrated in style with a spirited wine tasting (featuring a record 38 donated bottles!), a delicious catered array of tapas offerings, all sorts of goodies in the Silent Auction, and, of course, our annual awards!

2015_05_Recognition ProgramWe’re still tallying the bids from the auction, but judging from the early returns, it looks like we are going to raise nearly $3,000 for the SEFS Scholarship Fund! If you won an item and didn’t pick it up on Tuesday night—or if you left early and don’t know whether you won yet—you can expect an email in the next few days. It will include instructions for how to make your donation online, as well as how to connect with a donor if you bid on a particular experience. Otherwise, you can pick up all unclaimed items in Karl Wirsing’s office in Anderson 107B.

Without further ado, the award results!

Staff Member of the Year: Sarah Geurkink
Faculty Member of the Year: Professor Jon Bakker
Graduate Student of the Year: Samantha Zwicker
Undergraduate Student of the Year: Sophia Winkler-Schor

(Each of these honorees received a certificate and will have his or her name added to the plaque display in Anderson Hall.)

The John A. Wott Fellowship in Plant Collection and Curatorship, given in recognition of outstanding research and contributions to the Washington Park Arboretum: Chris Watson

The Richard D. Taber Outstanding Wildlife Conservation Student Award, given in recognition of exemplary performance in wildlife conservation: Ghee-Hee Yang

Director’s Awards for Outstanding Service to the School
Faculty: Professor Josh Lawler
Staff: David Campbell

We hope you’ll join us in congratulating each of these deserving winners, as well as all of the fantastic nominees, for continuing to make our school such a vibrant and inspiring community.

Also, we’d like to give a special thank you to our selection committee, which had an especially challenging job this year, and to everyone who submitted a nomination letter. So many others helped pull this event together, as well, including Steve West spearheading another spectacular wine tasting (and for everyone who generously donated bottles); Greg Ettl for serving as Master of Ceremonies; Sarah Thomas for organizing the award process; Amanda Davis for managing the catering and a dozen other tasks; everyone who donated—and bid on—the wonderful prizes and experiences for the Silent Auction; and so many others. Thank you!

Already looking forward to next year!

Testing the Waters

This morning, Professor David Butman was finishing up the installation of a new dissolved carbon dioxide sensor at a site on Issaquah Creek, which drains a relatively pristine forested watershed into Lake Washington. Professor Butman is looking at carbon dynamics to understand how stream systems fit into the terrestrial carbon cycle, and he is collaborating with the U.S. Geological Survey, which is embarking on a large-scale, intensive sampling for water quality across the Pacific Northwest. They’ll pool all of this data when they pull the sensors out in late fall.

“A collaborative time series of data like this does not really exist yet,” he says, “and we are doing this at two more sites in Bellingham that cover an urban and an agricultural watershed.”

David Butman

Alumni Spotlight: Melody Mobley

A few months ago, we reconnected with Melody S. Mobley, who graduated from the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences (SEFS) in 1979. Mobley was the first black American woman to earn a bachelor’s in forest management from the University of Washington, and though the landscape has improved markedly since she graduated, the importance of diversity in natural resource fields has never been greater.

Fifty-two percent of students at SEFS are now women, and almost 30 percent represent minority populations, including Asian and Native, among others. Yet there are still many underrepresented groups, and Mobley believes the stakes are too high to leave anybody out of the decision-making process.

Melody Mobley and her rescue pooch, Raina Elise, at Great Falls Park in Virginia.

Melody Mobley and her rescue puppy, Raina Elise, at Great Falls Park in Virginia. Mobley is part Cherokee Indian, and her middle name, Starya, is derived from Cherokee words that mean “stay strong.”

For her, the value of diversity isn’t about checking boxes or political correctness. Diversity is about being inclusive of different ethnicities, ages, regions, cultures, beliefs and ideas, and bringing all those variables into the discussion. It’s about mining every mind for potential solutions to achieve a sustainable balance with a changing climate and world. “It’s so important everybody contributes their voice, their brains, their perspective to formulating alternatives to managing the natural resources on our planet,” she says. “They have to. That’s the only way we’ll formulate the best plan.”

There’s also tremendous career opportunity in these fields. Starting as an undergrad in Seattle, Mobley worked for the U.S. Forest Service for 28 years. Her assignments took her from Skykomish, Wash., to California, Florida, Nevada and Washington, D.C., Intergovernmental Personnel Act assignments in Africa and South America, the Smithsonian National Zoo and the World Wildlife Fund, and exposed her to countless experiences and a life of constant learning. “There’s really something for everyone in natural resource management,” she says. “Attorneys, teachers, accountants, foresters, range managers, fire managers, hydrologists, soil scientists. You can find your niche.”

So while Mobley retired in 2005 and now lives in Arlington, Va., she has no desire to disengage. In fact, she’ll be giving the keynote address for the SEFS commencement ceremony on Friday, June 12. With incredible positivity and sense of purpose, she wants to share her story to help others achieve what she was able to achieve, and more. She wants to remove some of the barriers that made her own education and career more challenging, and to grow the diversity of people and ideas in the environmental community. “I wanted to just be myself and still be accepted and allowed to succeed,” she says. “I know we are strongest and bring the most to the table when we can be ourselves.”

Southern (Up)Roots
“My mother wanted to make sure we had the strongest educational foundation possible, and that we weren’t bored,” says Mobley, who grew up Louisville, Ky., in the 1960s and ‘70s. Her mom enrolled her in a predominantly white middle and high school, and Mobley—who is also part Cherokee Indian—excelled in her studies at an early age. She progressed so quickly that her mom pushed her to skip a couple grades, and she still ended up graduating third in her class of more than 500 students.

Before she finished high school, though, she had learned her mother was diagnosed with terminal throat cancer. “I was crazy with grief and needed a diversion,” she says.

Mobley waiting for a bus outside of Terry Hall (in the background), her first dorm at the University of Washington. Terry Hall housed students from 1953 to 2013, and a brand-new residence hall bearing the same name is set to open this year.

Mobley waiting for a bus outside of Terry Hall, her first dorm at the University of Washington. Terry Hall housed students from 1953 to 2013, and a brand-new residence hall bearing the same name is set to open this year.

While she had initially planned to attend the University of Louisville, Mobley channeled her sadness into a more ambitious and far-flung dream. She had fallen in love with the films and martial arts of Bruce Lee, who had passed away before Mobley saw his first movie. Yet she located a martial arts instructor who had supposedly studied with Lee. With the hope of training under this instructor, she made the bold move to head west and enroll at the University of Washington.

Her quest to learn from a Bruce Lee disciple didn’t last long. “He was such a pompous buffoon and a braggart,” says Mobley, “and I knew more about Bruce Lee than he did just from my reading.”

She gave up on him after one class, but there she was, alone, across the country from her family. And since she had jumped ahead in high school, Mobley felt much younger than her fellow students, and generally out of place. “I was 16, just turned 17 when I graduated from high school,” she says, “and I felt too young, too black, too Southern, too everything.”

As she tried to find her footing, Mobley ended up gravitating toward a long-time love of animals and the outdoors. “My mom got me interested in nature,” she says. “She would always take us out for rides in the country instead of being in the city so much.”

Mobley wasn’t sure how to direct that interest until she discovered the College of Forest Resources. She’d been waffling between majors from zoology to wildlife biology, but financial concerns from home—where her mother and grandmother were struggling with cancer—convinced her to be as practical as possible. A degree in forest management, she decided, would keep her active and connected to the outdoors, and also give her a strong opportunity to find permanent employment.

Even with her studies decided, Mobley still felt stranded and lonely as an undergrad. “I’m 57 years old and have never gotten married,” she says. “When you’re 17, 18, 19 years old, you would like to have a date every once in a while, but no one wanted to date me, and that was hard.”

Mobley modeling her uniform while for her first position with the Forest Service. This photo was part of a series taken for a promotional brochure.

Mobley modeling her uniform from her first position with the Forest Service. This photo was part of a series taken for a promotional brochure.

She survived through invaluable friendships with several faculty members. One of the first to help her settle into the city was Professor Stewart Pickford, who had earned his bachelor’s, master’s and Ph.D. from SEFS—the latter in 1972—before joining the faculty. She found a friend and mentor in Professor Emerita Linda Brubaker, and Mobley especially enjoyed working with Professor Kristiina Vogt, with whom she remains good friends. “My family when I was up there was Kristiina,” she says. “I worked in her lab for a few years, and she was with me on my 21st birthday. I even got flowers from her on my last birthday. I love her with all my heart.”

Mobley credits those three professors with guiding and motivating her through school. “I would never have succeeded, or been able to graduate, without Stewart and Kristiina and Linda,” she says. “They were instrumental to my success. I’m so grateful to them.”

Forestry Futures
In addition to helping Mobley feel more at home at college, Professor Pickford introduced her to his friends Diane and Al Becker, who immediately took an interest in helping her career. One night they took her to a Society of American Foresters meeting, where she made a connection with Lyle Laverty, who was a district ranger in Skykomish at the time. That night, Laverty decided he was going to recruit her into the Forest Service, he later told Mobley.

“Until I moved to Seattle, I had not even heard of the Forest Service,” says Mobley, “and I had never intended to be a forester.” Yet soon she had a job offer to join the agency in 1977, and she would end up working there for nearly three decades.

Armed with a machine gun, Mobley tracks down illegally grown marijuana—which you can see behind her—in Nevada’s Toiyable National Forest.

Armed with semiautomatic rifle, Mobley tracks down illegally grown marijuana—which you can see behind her—in Nevada’s Toiyable National Forest.

She spent her first five years in Skykomish, including the first two while still finishing up school. Those were tough years, she says, juggling her work and studies, bouncing between the extremes of a big city and a tiny community—all with no car or easy way to get around on her own. After Skykomish, though, Mobley began exploring the country through a variety of posts, from a public affairs position in San Diego with the Cleveland National Forest; to a temporary assignment as an assistant district ranger with the Klamath National Forest in northern California; to a stop with Florida’s Ocala National Forest; and then to the national headquarters in Washington, D.C.

Along the way, she spent time as a trainer, doing public speaking, working on program and performance reviews, and representing the Forest Service at a number of events. She was promoted multiple times, and during one stint in Nevada’s Toiyabe National Forest she even had the memorable opportunity to participate in helicopter marijuana raids. (Mobley was part of a team assigned to find remote, hidden sites where people were illegally growing pot on national forest lands. “Oh, they were fun,” she says, “and I got to carry a semiautomatic rifle—I couldn’t believe it.”)

Race and Role Models
Throughout her education and career, and nearly everywhere she moved or traveled, Mobley felt the weight of her identity, and how often she stuck out from her peers and surroundings. She remembers when she arrived in Skykomish for that first job with the Forest Service, and being told she was probably the only black person within 70 miles. Or several years later, when she attended a reforestation workshop in Darrington, Wash., and was informed she was probably the first black person ever to spend the night there.

Mobley with F. Dale Robertson, chief of the Forest Service from 1987 to 1993

Mobley with F. Dale Robertson, chief of the Forest Service from 1987 to 1993

Those memories are hard to shake, she says. They make you acutely aware of your skin color, and what it feels like to be singled out and in the overwhelming minority. As a result, she felt a constant pressure to push herself to succeed, and to give no one an excuse to doubt or deter her. “I moved nine times in 11 years, because I wanted to learn a lot,” says Mobley. “I didn’t want anybody to honestly be able to say I got promoted because I was a black female. I got promoted because I knew my science.”

Now, she wants to encourage and inspire more women and diverse students to pursue careers like hers. One of the biggest hurdles to expanding diversity, after all, is drawing students into a field where they might not have recognizable role models. Mobley wants to make it easier for them, to give them confidence and let them know there’s a place in natural resource fields for everyone—and for everyone to make a real impact. “I didn’t have a lot of black people or people of color who helped me, because there weren’t many black people or people of color in a position to help me,” she says. “My goal is to make a difference so there are 1,000 Melodys.”

Photos © Melody Mobley.

Melody Mobley

“Don’t ever try to get by on being a unique gender, race or ethnicity,” says Mobley. “Have the strongest work ethic, and be the best student you can possibly be.”

 

UW Climate Change Video Awards: Meet the Judges!

This winter and spring, we challenged high school and undergraduate students in the state of Washington to grab a camera and show us what climate change means to them in three minutes or less for the first-ever UW Climate Change Video Contest. For months, the entries trickled in, but the pace really picked up during the last week, with a flood of submissions nearly crashing our system in the final hours!

And now the reel fun begins…

Join us at Town Hall on Friday, May 15, from 7 to 9 p.m. for a screening of the top 10 video entries, and see who snags the $5,000 grand prize—one for both the high school and college categories. A renowned panel of judges will be on hand to select the winners and discuss the students’ work.

It’s going to be a great show, and we hope you’ll join us in recognizing these incredibly talented students. The screening and award ceremony is free and open to the public, and doors open at 6:30 p.m. Register now!

Meet the Judges

Annie LeonardAnnie Leonard (Judge and emcee)
Annie Leonard was born and raised in Seattle and is now the executive director of Greenpeace USA. She is also the author and host of The Story of Stuff, an online film series that has been viewed more than 50 million times around the world.

She has visited more than 40 countries investigating the hidden environmental, social and health impacts of all the stuff in our lives, and she has worked for a number of environmental organizations, ranging from Ralph Nader’s office to Health Care Without Harm.

DJ SpookyPaul D. Miller, aka DJ Spooky
Paul D. Miller is a composer, multimedia artist and writer. He has created many works based on his travels to the Arctic and Antarctic, including multimedia stage works: “Arctic Rhythms,” “Check Your Math,” “Terra Nova: Sinfonia Antarctica”; art exhibition “Ice Music”; and The Book of Ice, a graphic book that explores the impact of climate change on Antarctica through the prism of digital media and contemporary music.

Miller’s film credits include “Rebirth of a Nation” (2007), a remixing of DW Griffith’s “Birth of a Nation”; original film score for “Downloaded” (2013), a musical documentary about the rise of NAPSTER; and original film score for “Traceable” (2014), a documentary that explores the sustainability of the fashion industry. National Geographic named Miller an Emerging Explorer (2014-2015), and he is currently touring in support of his new book, The Imaginary App.

Randy OlsonRandy Olson
Scientist-turned-filmmaker Randy Olson realized that after 15 years of telling stories OF science he had grown more interested in telling stories ABOUT science. Despite his Harvard Ph.D., four years of post-doctoral research in Australia and Florida, and years of diving around the world from the Great Barrier Reef to Antarctica, he tossed it all in, resigned from his tenured professorship at the University of New Hampshire, and moved to Hollywood to explore film as a medium for communicating science.

In addition to writing and directing his own feature films about major issues in science, Olson has worked with a variety of clients to assist them with the use of visual media in communicating science to the general public. Through his writings he has both related his journey, and continues his exploration into the role of storytelling in the mass communication of science.

Dean Lisa GraumlichDean Lisa J. Graumlich
Dr. Lisa J. Graumlich, Virginia and Prentice Bloedel Professor, is the inaugural dean of the College of the Environment at the University of Washington. As dean, she leads a college with unparalleled depth and breadth in environmental systems: from the forests to the seas, and from the depths of the Earth to the edges of the solar system. As a scholar, Graumlich pioneered the use of tree-ring data to understand long-term trends in climate, focusing on the mountains of western North America. She is actively engaged with a broad range of stakeholders to understand the impacts of climate change on wilderness and natural areas.

Summer Field Assistants Needed for Wolf-Deer-Plant Research

Looking for some hands-on field research experience this summer? Precisely the sort of the training that employers and graduate programs are eager to find on your resume?!

Well, SEFS doctoral student Apryle Craig is recruiting student volunteers to assist with installing deer exclosures as part of a research study investigating the impacts of recolonizing wolves on deer herbivory in northeast Washington. Volunteers may also have the opportunity to practice radio telemetry, install trail cameras, review camera footage, and more. Independent study credit may be available, as well.

Deer grazing cage.

Deer grazing cage.

Volunteers should be comfortable working long days, usually in teams of two, and will be moving rolls of fencing and cutting wire. You’ll be camping most nights of the week, working Monday through Friday, and then have weekends off (and you’re of course allowed to stay at the camp if you choose). Experience with plant identification is a plus but not required—and please indicate if you feel comfortable identifying plants of northeast Washington to species-level. Safety is a priority, too, so please also indicate if you have CPR and/or first aid training.

Volunteers should be willing to commit a minimum of two weeks, but you can also extend your stay from mid-June through mid-September (to coincide with the UW summer session).

Positions are open until filled, and you can contact Apryle at apryle@uw.edu for more details or to apply!

Photo © Apryle Craig.

Director’s Message: Spring 2015

While I was out running at 5 a.m. the other morning, I was thrilled to see the sky beginning to lighten on the horizon. Getting up and out the door at that hour is pretty brutal any time of year, but it’s particularly discouraging during the darkest, dampest months. So that faint glow offered a wonderful promise of lengthening days throughout April and into the summer.

We’re starting to see a similar horizon in our school, and it comes on the heels of an extended ‘winter’ of retirements. Each quarter, it seems, we’ve had to say goodbye to another round of great friends and colleagues, including some of our longest-tenured professors—from Dave Manuwal, Tom Hinckley and Bob Edmonds to Steve West, then David Ford and Kevin Hodgson, and now Frank Greulich, Bruce Bare and Gordon Bradley.

2015_04_Spring 2015These farewells have been sad and profound, and it’s hard to quantify just how much their absence will affect our community. The personality of a school or university, after all, is never static. It’s always shifting and evolving with the people who work here, and you can never exactly replace the experience—let alone the institutional memory and character—of one faculty member with another.

Yet these departures have also signaled a period of opportunity and new beginnings for the school. We’ve already added three new professors this year, and I’m excited to welcome their energy and ideas. Professor David Butman is a watershed biogeochemist who has joined us from Yale University as a joint appointment with Civil and Environmental Engineering. David studies carbon and nitrogen flux in whole watershed studies, and he provides our programs with an increasingly important perspective in freshwater ecosystems. Professor Patrick Tobin is our new disturbance ecologist who joined us from the U.S. Forest Service in Morgantown, W.Va. Patrick is an entomologist and forest health specialist who primarily focuses on large-scale insect infestations of forest ecosystems, and his work has broad applications for forest management. Through some internal shuffling, we were then able to hire Professor Peter Kahn in a half-time capacity. Peter is an eco-psychologist who works on evaluating the human relationship with nature, and he holds a joint appointment with the Department of Psychology.

As our new faculty members have gotten settled, we have also hosted several additional searches this winter and spring. We have now hired—or are in the process of hiring—three more professors, with the possibility of a fourth coming soon. On April 1, Dr. Bernard Bormann took over as the new director of our Olympic Natural Resources Center in Forks, Wash. Bernard joins us after 34 years with the Forest Service, and his research focuses on forest ecology and physiology. Dr. Anthony Dichiara is a chemical engineer who comes to us from the Rochester Institute of Technology. Anthony will join our bioresource science and engineering group this fall, providing new expertise in bioproducts. By then, we’ll also be welcoming at least one new quantitative wildlife ecologist, and it now looks like we’ll be able to hire two.

These faculty members bring a wealth of new strengths and capacities. They’ll greatly enhance our ability to address the complexities of land management, and the potential for new and dynamic products both here and abroad. And they give me hope for what we’ll be able to accomplish in the coming years—in the lab and in the classroom, and in all of the environments around us.

So while it would be easy to dwell on all we’re losing, I’ll also hold onto the feeling of that sunrise, and the promise of new beginnings.

Tom DeLuca
School of Environmental and Forest Sciences

Taking Flight: Lisa Hannon Heads South for Research Trip to Costa Rica, Argentina

This past February and March, SEFS doctoral student Lisa Hannon took advantage of a rare opportunity to combine a research visit to Costa Rica with an intensive field course in Argentina studying hymenopterans, the third largest order of insects, including wasps, bees and ants.

Hannon, left, with with fellow HYM Course students from Alaska and Taiwan.

Hannon, left, with with fellow HYM Course students from Alaska and Taiwan.

An NSF Graduate Fellow, Hannon works with SEFS Professor Sharon Doty in the Plant Microbiology Lab, and some of her research involves studying agriculturally important microbes associated with sustainable Coffea arabica production. She also is researching how landscape and farmer practices in coffee plantations impact parasitoid wasp communities, which is important for integrated pest management.

Improving the sustainability of coffee production is a huge research area—whether through reducing the reliance on chemical inputs (e.g. fertilizers, fungicides, herbicides or pesticides), or by maintaining natural areas to provide habitat for native pollinators or parasitoid wasps. Globally, more than 100 million people depend on coffee production for subsistence; in Mexico and Central America alone, the production and processing of coffee employs approximately 8.5 million people.

So for the first leg of her trip in Costa Rica, Hannon spent a week meeting with research collaborators and visiting her coffee plantation field sites. “Usually, I am in the Tarrazú Valley during the rainy season, when there is greater biodiversity of bees and wasps,” says Hannon. “My field sites are located in the cloud forests on Costa Rica’s Pacific slope, so we typically receive three meters of rain while I’m there sampling. So traveling this year during the dry season to see the coffee harvest was a nice change of pace for me.”

Argentine micro-hymenoptera (4 mm)

Argentine micro-hymenoptera (4 mm)

For the second leg, Hannon then continued south to the highlands of northwest Argentina to participate in a professional hymenopteran course, known as HYM Course, sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution. She joined a group of 20 researchers selected to attend; most were from North, Central and South America, but some traveled from as far away as Australia and Angola. Course participants included other graduate students, university professors, laboratory technicians and even two curators from the American Natural History Museum in New York. They received highly specialized training in identifying parasitic and predatory wasps, sawflies, wood wasps, bees and ants—all in a novel and unfamiliar location—and they learned taxonomic identification, advanced field collection methods and specialized preservation techniques.

“This course was a wonderful opportunity not only to receive individualized instruction from expert researchers, but also to meet potential collaborators for future projects,” says Hannon. “I feel very fortunate for being selected to attend.”

Photos © Lisa Hannon.

Hannon sampling in the Sierra Velasco mountains at the former Argentine president’s private hunting lodge.

Hannon sampling in the Sierra Velasco mountains at the former Argentine president’s private hunting lodge.

 

Xi Sigma Pi Research Grants: Apply Now!

This spring, the Xi Sigma Pi forestry honor society is offering two $1,000 research grant awards for SEFS undergraduate and graduate students!

Xi Sigma Pi Research Grants $2,000All students currently enrolled in SEFS are eligible to apply, and the grants will be awarded based on merit and financial need for research activities and equipment. It’s a great way to boost your research program, and also to gain experience with the proposal process!

All applications are due by 5 p.m. on May 8, and grant recipients will be notified later that month. You can upload your application online via catalyst or drop off a completed packet to David Campbell or Lisa Nordlund in Anderson 116/130.

Email xsp@uw.edu if you have any questions, and good luck!

Proposal Instructions
Please include the following items in the grant application packet:

  1. A resume no longer than 2 pages, single-spaced, and which includes the following information:
    a. Education history
    b. Work history
    c. Achievements
    d. Volunteer work
    e. Do not include references
  2. Letter of recommendation from advisor, committee member or influential faculty member. The author must email this document separately to xsp@uw.edu before 5 p.m. on May 8.
  3. Current transcript (unofficial or official).
  4. Proposal for Research Grant that does not exceed 3 pages, double-spaced (excluding works cited)
    a. Title
    b. PI and Co-PI with contact information
    c. Project description:
    i. Objectives and significance of project
    ii. Methods to be employed
    iii. Anticipated outcome and effect of project fulfillment
    iv. Timeline of the project completion and deliverables
    d. Statement of financial need with budget of the specific proposed project
    e. Other funding sources or scholarships received
    f. Works cited