SEFS Senior Seminar: Spring 2016 Schedule

This spring, Professor Bernard Bormann has organized the SEFS Senior Seminar (ESRM 429a) around the theme, “Westside forestry: What have we learned in the past 30 years from different disciplinary perspectives that could be influencing future directions?”

The intent of this seminar is to present different perspectives on sustainable forest management in the Pacific Northwest, and to show how they come together to inform forest policy as a whole. Lectures will come mostly from chapter authors in an upcoming book from Island Press, Sustaining people and nature in moist conifer-dominated human-forest ecosystems.

The seminars are held on Tuesday mornings from 8:30 to 9:20 a.m. in Anderson Hall 223.

The public is invited, so mark your calendars for the talks below!

Week 1: March 29
“Sustainability framework for integrated analysis”
Beatrice van Horne
Ecosystem Program Coordinator, USGS

Week 2: April 5
“Role of forests in regional economies”
Richard Haynes
Retired economist, U.S. Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station

Week 3: April 12
“Sustainable ecosystem services”
Robert Deal
Team Leader, Pacific Northwest Research Station

Week 4: April 19
“The development and evolution of collaboratives”
Professor Stanley Asah
SEFS

Week 5: April 26
“Silviculture for sustainability”
Paul D. Anderson
Supervisory Research Forester, Team Leader
Pacific Northwest Research Station

Week 6: May 3
“Sustainability and adaptive management”
Teodora Minkova
Natural Resource Scientist,
Washington Department of Natural Resources

Week 7: May 10
“Biodiversity and sustainability”
Dede Olson
Supervisory Research Ecologist, Team Leader
Pacific Northwest Research Station, Corvallis Forestry Sciences Lab

Week 8: May 17
“Vegetation ecology and dynamics”
Professor Jerry Franklin
SEFS

Week 9: May 24
“Synthesis and implications for plan revisions for the National Forest”
Professor Bernard Bormann
SEFS
Director, Olympic Natural Resources Center

Week 10: May 31
No Seminar

Guest Lecture (10/30): William R. Burch

Coming up on Friday, October 30, at 1:30 p.m. in the Forest Club Room, we are very pleased to host a guest lecture featuring Professor Emeritus William R. Burch from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies: “Pulaski, Passion and Participation: Looking to the Past for the Future of Natural Resource Professions.”

Professor Burch

Professor Burch

SEFS Professor Bernard Bormann arranged for this special visit from Professor Burch, a renowned forest sociologist whose work with community and social forestry has touched communities across the country and world, from the Baltimore Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) network to projects in Asia, Europe and South America—as well as an ongoing monitoring and evaluation project on the $26 million restoration of Philadelphia’s Fairmount Park system. Burch was an early pioneer in theoretical efforts to integrate ecology and community, and developing a unified ecosystem management approach that fully includes humans as part of the ecosystem. He has also been a leader in researching recreation behavior and ecotourism in wild, preserved and urban places.

We’re excited to welcome Professor Burch to campus, and we hope you’ll join us for his talk!

SEFS Seminar Series: Fall 2015 Schedule!

The schedule is set for the SEFS Seminar Series this fall, and we’ve pulled together an especially diverse line-up, ranging from a hands-on workshop about capturing great video of your field research, to talks about drones, the Northwest Forest Plan, resource management in southwest China, and much more!

Held on Wednesdays from 3:30 to 4:20 p.m. in Anderson 223, the talks are always open to the public, and the first seminar of each month will be followed by a casual reception down the hall in the Forest Club Room. Students can register for course credit under SEFS 529A.

Check out the schedule below and join us for as many talks as you can!

2015_Fall_SEFS Seminar Series PosterWeek 1: September 30
“The Trees By the Stream are Your Uncle: Traditional Knowledge and Resource Management in Southwest China”
Professor Stevan Harrell, SEFS/Anthropology

Week 2: October 7* (Distinguished Alumni Speaker)
“Integrated Pest Management Application to Future Forest Health”
Will Littke, Retired Forest Health Researcher, Weyerhaeuser

Week 3: October 14
“Constraints and Drivers of Bark Beetle Outbreaks: And How We’ve Made a Difficult Lifestyle Easier”
Professor Ken Raffa, University of Wisconsin

Week 4: October 21
“How to Shoot Usable Video of your Research”
Ethan Steinman, Producer/Director, Daltonic Films

Week 5: October 28 
“Climate Change Adaptation on Federal Lands in the Western U.S.”
Dr. Jessica Halofsky, Research Ecologist, Pacific Wildland Fire Sciences Lab

Week 6: November 4*
“What Do Faculty Know About Undergraduate Curricula? Some Insights From Faculty Leadership at UW”
Michelle Trudeau, Director, SEFS Student & Academic Services

Week 7: November 11
No Seminar (Holiday)

Week 8: November 18
“Nature’s Services: Advancing Frontiers in the Communication, Science and Practice of Ecosystem Services”
Dr. Anne Guerry, The Natural Capital Project

Week 9: November 25
No Seminar (Thanksgiving)

Week 10: December 2 *
“To Drone or Not to Drone: UAS for Ecological Applications”
Professor Monika Moskal, SEFS

Week 11: December 9
“Real Changes? 20-year Interpretation of the Northwest Forest Plan”
Professor Bernard Bormann, SEFS

* Indicates reception after seminar

Director’s Message: Spring 2015

While I was out running at 5 a.m. the other morning, I was thrilled to see the sky beginning to lighten on the horizon. Getting up and out the door at that hour is pretty brutal any time of year, but it’s particularly discouraging during the darkest, dampest months. So that faint glow offered a wonderful promise of lengthening days throughout April and into the summer.

We’re starting to see a similar horizon in our school, and it comes on the heels of an extended ‘winter’ of retirements. Each quarter, it seems, we’ve had to say goodbye to another round of great friends and colleagues, including some of our longest-tenured professors—from Dave Manuwal, Tom Hinckley and Bob Edmonds to Steve West, then David Ford and Kevin Hodgson, and now Frank Greulich, Bruce Bare and Gordon Bradley.

2015_04_Spring 2015These farewells have been sad and profound, and it’s hard to quantify just how much their absence will affect our community. The personality of a school or university, after all, is never static. It’s always shifting and evolving with the people who work here, and you can never exactly replace the experience—let alone the institutional memory and character—of one faculty member with another.

Yet these departures have also signaled a period of opportunity and new beginnings for the school. We’ve already added three new professors this year, and I’m excited to welcome their energy and ideas. Professor David Butman is a watershed biogeochemist who has joined us from Yale University as a joint appointment with Civil and Environmental Engineering. David studies carbon and nitrogen flux in whole watershed studies, and he provides our programs with an increasingly important perspective in freshwater ecosystems. Professor Patrick Tobin is our new disturbance ecologist who joined us from the U.S. Forest Service in Morgantown, W.Va. Patrick is an entomologist and forest health specialist who primarily focuses on large-scale insect infestations of forest ecosystems, and his work has broad applications for forest management. Through some internal shuffling, we were then able to hire Professor Peter Kahn in a half-time capacity. Peter is an eco-psychologist who works on evaluating the human relationship with nature, and he holds a joint appointment with the Department of Psychology.

As our new faculty members have gotten settled, we have also hosted several additional searches this winter and spring. We have now hired—or are in the process of hiring—three more professors, with the possibility of a fourth coming soon. On April 1, Dr. Bernard Bormann took over as the new director of our Olympic Natural Resources Center in Forks, Wash. Bernard joins us after 34 years with the Forest Service, and his research focuses on forest ecology and physiology. Dr. Anthony Dichiara is a chemical engineer who comes to us from the Rochester Institute of Technology. Anthony will join our bioresource science and engineering group this fall, providing new expertise in bioproducts. By then, we’ll also be welcoming at least one new quantitative wildlife ecologist, and it now looks like we’ll be able to hire two.

These faculty members bring a wealth of new strengths and capacities. They’ll greatly enhance our ability to address the complexities of land management, and the potential for new and dynamic products both here and abroad. And they give me hope for what we’ll be able to accomplish in the coming years—in the lab and in the classroom, and in all of the environments around us.

So while it would be easy to dwell on all we’re losing, I’ll also hold onto the feeling of that sunrise, and the promise of new beginnings.

Tom DeLuca
School of Environmental and Forest Sciences

New Faculty Intro: Bernard Bormann

We are extremely pleased to welcome Dr. Bernard Bormann as the new director of the Olympic Natural Resources Center (ONRC) in Forks, Wash., and as a professor of forest ecology and physiology for SEFS! His first official day in the office was April 1, and we hope you’ll join us in welcoming him to our community.

Bernard BormannProfessor Bormann spent most of his childhood in New England, including Hanover, N.H., and near New Haven, Conn., and he joins ONRC after a 34-year career as a scientist with the U.S. Forest Service. Since 1989, he has led the Long-Term Ecosystem Productivity Program for the Pacific Northwest Research Station, and he brings a strong interest in adaptive management. He is looking forward to upholding the original intent of ONRC to serve as a hub of collaborative research—a neutral forum that unites researchers, students, professionals and the public to solve critical issues in forestry and marine management throughout the Olympic Peninsula. He is also excited to develop and study multiple creative, win-win solutions that can reverse declines in both ecological resilience and rural community well-being across the region.

Professor Bormann has a long history in the Puget Sound region. He received his B.S. in plant ecology from Evergreen State College in 1976, his M.S. in plant ecology from the University of Washington in 1978, and then his Ph.D. in forest physiology from Oregon State University in 1981.

You can reach him at his ONRC office at 206.685.9477 and by email at bormann@uw.edu.

Welcome, Bernard!

Photo © Bernard Bormann.