This Friday (6/3): Dead Elk Spring Party!

Come celebrate the end of classes this Friday, June 3, at the Dead Elk Society’s annual spring party! “Fin de Año” starts at 5 p.m. at the Center for Urban Horticulture Headhouse, which is around the back side of the Douglas Research Conservatory greenhouse. There will be games, free food and plenty of free beer, and also live music from Mariachi Quinto Sol de UW.

All are welcome—students, staff, faculty, friends and family—so head over to CUH for a fun-filled fiesta!

2016 Dead Elk Spring Party

Director’s Message: Winter 2016

While I was biking into work this past Monday, the air was incredibly cool and crisp, and the sky was actually somewhat blue for a change. I remember thinking, “What a perfect way to start another work week in January.” Then, as I walked into Anderson Hall I heard the sound of someone playing piano up in the Forest Club Room. Those notes reinforced my optimistic feeling for the week and made me think of our wonderful community at SEFS—and, in many ways, how much of it revolves around that room.

The 26-foot noble fir, brought up from Pack Forest for the SEFS Holiday Party this year, soars toward the ceiling of the Forest Club Room.

The 26-foot noble fir, brought up from Pack Forest for the SEFS Holiday Party this year, soars toward the ceiling of the Forest Club Room.

When Agnes Anderson donated the financial support to build Anderson Hall in the early 1920s, she stipulated that the large room on the second floor was to be known as the Forest Club Room, and that it would forever be dedicated to students within our School. Her intent was to create a reading room and a common space where students could gather, discuss, study, invent, reflect, forecast and celebrate. The room also happens to be visually impressive, as it has a vaulted gabled ceiling with chandelier lights, a balcony, a large fireplace that we use at annual events, and tall multi-paneled windows that create a cozy, naturally lit atmosphere. It has picked up a few other more eclectic features over the years—such as the elk head mounted on the balcony railing—yet is has remained a warm and inviting space.

For us, as well, it means so much more. Since coming to the University of Washington in 2012, I have emphasized the importance of community within the School, and the Forest Club Room plays a key role in uniting us as friends and colleagues. Sure, the couches are a bit tattered and the tables wobbly—and the carpet seems to attract a remarkable assortment of crumbs—but the room represents so much that is great about our programs, our history, our integrity, our enthusiasm and dedication to our science. It’s the staging ground for scores of meetings and social events, and a catalyst for interdisciplinary activities. Just in the past few months, the room has hosted receptions after SEFS graduate seminars; it was the site of the SEFS Holiday party, a Pecha Kucha night with the International Forestry Students’ Association, and a couple Dead Elk parties that echoed laughter through Anderson Hall late into the evening. In the next few months, the room will be home to a Natural Resources Career Fair, the Graduate Student Symposium and prospective graduate student weekend, a Capstone Poster Session to showcase undergraduate research, thesis and dissertation defenses, and so many other solo and group work sessions. The secret is out, too, as just last year the UW Daily ranked the room as one of the best study spots on campus.

Even as we plan for Anderson Hall to get a major refurbishment in the next several years, we will make sure the Forest Club Room remains almost exactly as it is today, just with updated lighting, insulation and windows. After all, the room is like so much of what we offer in our School—unpretentious, welcoming and enriching. On chilly and rainy winter days, especially, it is both a place of retreat and the platform for an advance. It is part of the very fabric that makes us such a special and cohesive program. So, as the piano softly plays in the Forest Club Room, I welcome you as students, colleagues, alumni and friends to come and enjoy this warm and wonderful space during the cold, dark months of winter—and any other time you find yourself in these halls.

Tom DeLuca
School of Environmental and Forest Sciences

Next Friday (12/5): Dead Elk Holiday Party!

No word on holly, but you should expect plenty of jolly at the Dead Elk Society’s annual Holiday Party next Friday, December 5!

The fun starts at 5:30 p.m. in the Forest Club Room, where you will find beer, singing, mulled wine, food and a cracklin’ fire in the fireplace. All SEFS students, staff and faculty are warmly invited, so bring your friends and family—and, if you have the time and inclination, a food item to share!

Follow the Dead Elk Society on Facebook if you’d like to stay updated on activities, and contact Melissa Pingree if you have any questions about the party.

Dead Elk Holiday Party

SEFS Seminar Series: Fall Schedule Announced!

If you’ve been pining for the sound of stirring voices and enthralled audiences, you’ll be excited to know the SEFS Seminar Series is booting up for the fall on Wednesday, September 24!

SEFS Seminar Schedule: Fall 2014We’ve lined up 10 weeks of fantastic talks, including presentations from two new faculty members—Professors Patrick Tobin and David Butman—as well as visiting speakers from CalPoly, Portland State University and other units on campus. Also, the final seminar will feature an alumni speaker, Stephen Hopley, to talk about his life and career in paper science and engineering.

Once again, we’re partnering with the Dead Elk Society to host a casual reception in the Forest Club Room following the seminar on November 5. Two other seminars will coincide with annual school-wide events, starting with the Salmon BBQ on October 1, and then the SEFS Holiday Party on December 3.

The seminars will be held on Wednesdays from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. in Anderson 223. (Students can enroll for credit under SEFS 529B; contact Michelle Trudeau for more information.)

So check out the full line-up below, and get ready for 10 weeks of terrific talks!

Week 1: September 24
Professor Patrick Tobin
“Allee effects and biological invasions: Exploiting an Achilles’ Heel in management strategies”

Week 2: October 1
Professor Rob Harrison
“The ‘hidden half’ of PNW forests: Understanding why our trees grow so fast”
* Salmon BBQ to follow in Anderson Hall courtyard

Week 3: October 8
Research Scientist Vane Kane
“Biophysical controls on forest structure and disturbance across landscapes”

Week 4: October 15
Professor Rebecca Neumann, Civil and Environmental Engineering
“Climate change and arsenic uptake by rice: Impact of elevated soil temperature on rhizosphere oxygen dynamics and arsenic concentrations in rice tissue”

Week 5: October 22
Professor Christian Torgersen
“The Fourth Paradigm and data-driven discovery in riverine science”

Week 6: October 29
Professor David Butman
“Fitting freshwater ecosystems into the boreal and arctic carbon cycles”

Week 7: November 5
Professor Vince Gallucci, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (and SEFS)
“Biodiversity of Arctic Ocean fauna as related to indigenous populations and climate change”
* Reception to follow in Forest Club Room

Week 8: November 12
Professor Sarah Bisbing, CalPoly
“Landscape influence on gene flow and connectivity across the range of Pinus contorta”

Week 9: November 19
Professor Todd Rosenstiel, Portland State University
“Canopies of change: Reconsidering bryophytes, biofuels and brown clouds in the PNW”

Week 10: December 3
Stephen M. Hopley, Alumni Speaker
“My life story as a paper science and engineering graduate”

The Annual Christmas Tree Sale is Back!

With eggnog muscling onto grocery shelves around the city, and holiday jingles taking over the airwaves, it could mean only one thing: Time for the UW Forest Club’s Annual Christmas Tree Sale!

Xmas Tree Sale

Community members pick up their trees from the Center for Urban Horticulture.

The Forest Club is proud to keep up this popular tradition, and they’re offering Noble Firs for $45.

The deadline to order your tree is Friday, December 6. Members of the Forest Club will be cutting the firs on Saturday, December 7, and then you can pick up your tree on Sunday, December 8, between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. at the Center for Urban Horticulture.

The trees generally range in size from 6-8 feet tall, though some can be a bit shorter—so come early if you’re hoping for the biggest of the bunch!

As in previous years, all you have to do is print out and mail in the order form to the UW Forest Club (at the address listed on the form). You can also pick up or drop off completed forms—along with payment; cash and checks are accepted—from Amanda Davis in the Student & Academic Services Office, Anderson 130. Your order must be received by December 6 at the latest.

All proceeds greatly benefit the UW Forest Club, the Society of American Foresters UW Chapter, and the Dead Elk Society. So order your Noble Fir for a noble cause today!

If you have any questions, contact Forest Club President Justine Andreychuk at 425.802.6158 or justinea@uw.edu.

Happy holidays!

Photo of Forest Club members harvesting firs below © Matt Davis.

Matt Davis