Director’s Message: Summer 2013

Last December, Forbes magazine published an article on the 10 “worst” college degrees, and a sister article on the 15 “most valuable” college degrees. Even though I immediately disagreed with the reduction of “value” to a dollar figure—and noted that “most valuable” is not a direct antonym for “worst”—the message to readers was unmistakable: A college degree is valued by the employment potential and the starting wages for recent grads.

I sighed in relief as I paged through the article and didn’t find natural resource and forest management or environmental science among the ranks of their list. That said, I was surprised and dismayed to see anthropology (the study of humankind) at the top, and subjects like art, philosophy and history also considered “worst” among our college offerings.

Jennifer Perkins

Jennifer Perkins, a 2011 graduate from SEFS, now works at the UW Office of Environmental Stewardship & Sustainability.

Not long after I read the Forbes piece, a similar story on LinkedIn again pinned the value of a college degree squarely on employment and entry pay. Without question, a college education should lead to a marketable skillset and a living wage. But I couldn’t help thinking that lost in these calculations of “value” is that students might not just want to make a living—they might want to love their living.

When I think about our own programs at SEFS, it’s impossible to miss that during the last six years, our Environmental Science and Resources Management (ESRM) major and Bioresource Science and Engineering (BSE) degrees have seen steady growth. For the past few years, moreover, our BSE graduates have had a 100-percent success rate landing jobs as soon as they’re finished with school, and in many cases long before graduation.

Take Megan James, a senior BSE major who is about to graduate this June. She’s been actively involved in papermaking at SEFS, and last summer she completed an internship with Procter & Gamble. That experience led to a job offer to continue on full-time after graduation as a process engineer at a brand-new paper plant in Bear River City, Utah.

Or consider Jennifer Perkins, who graduated as an ESRM major in 2011. Shortly after she finished school, she landed a position just up the road as the program coordinator for the University of Washington Environmental Stewardship & Sustainability Office. She’s loving her job promoting sustainability projects around campus, and she credits much of her enthusiasm and environmental expertise with her time at SEFS.

I also think of Dr. Brian Kertson, a SEFS alumnus who now works with the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife. He came through all levels of our program, earning his B.S. in forest resources (wildlife science) in 2001, then an M.S. and then a Ph.D.—and now he has a dream job working with large carnivores, and especially cougars, in the state.

Megan James

Megan James, left, and other members of the student TAPPI chapter during their annual holiday papermaking project.

The list goes on and on, and the more I think about it, the more I see how flawed the metrics are in the Forbes and LinkedIn stories. Nowhere in these articles or analyses is there consideration of “quality of life,” or deep interest or devotion to the topic or craft that might become the focus of the majority of our waking hours. Reflecting on my own degrees in soil science, I know I didn’t enroll in the major for the employment opportunities or high salary potential. Rather, I pursued the natural resources because of my desire to work on something real and tangible, my love for the outdoors, love of science, my awe at the complexity of ecosystems and particularly soils, and for so many creative possibilities of study and exploration.

Passion will carry you a long way toward success, and that starts, in many cases, with enjoying the job in front of you. So as our undergraduate and graduate students head out into the world, I am confident we have not only improved their employability, but perhaps more important, we have enhanced their environmental and conservation literacy, sharpened their critical thinking skills, and prepared them for a lifetime of growth and career satisfaction. They’ll have to chance to do what they know, and in fields they love. I’m not convinced there’s a more “valuable” outcome you can hope to achieve from an education.

Photo of Jennifer Perkins © Jennifer Perkins; photo of Megan James © Megan James.

Undergrad Spotlight: Tara Wilson

“It’s amazing how much you can learn from looking at poop,” says Tara Wilson, a junior at the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences (SEFS). “It totally blew my mind. You can know everything [about the animal]—if they’re malnourished, if they’re breeding, if they’re stressed in any way, what they’re eating.”

Tara Wilson

Tara Wilson working on the Pack Forest Summer Crew in 2012.

Wilson grew up in Detroit and transferred to the University of Washington to start the Winter Quarter in January 2012. She had already earned an Associate’s Degree back home, and she moved out to Seattle with her husband, Shane Unsworth, after he found as job as a data security analyst in the city.

Her adventures in scat began soon after arriving on campus when she attended a wildlife seminar about conservation canines that are specifically trained to sniff out animal droppings. For this particular talk, the dogs were snooping for orca poo. There’s only a small window to locate such scat, apparently, as it floats to the surface briefly before sinking out of reach. So the trainers would hold the dogs at the bow of the boat to locate the floaters as quickly as possible.

“You don’t often see that in a seminar,” says Wilson. “It’s just so out-of-the-box and creative to me—really innovative.”

Inspired by the science of that seminar, Wilson soon landed a weekly lab position with Professor Sam Wasser, director of the Center for Conservation Biology in the UW Biology Department. She and the other volunteer technicians are working on a host of projects, from extracting hormones to analyzing dolphin and polar bear scat.

“What’s special about the lab is that we use non-invasive techniques,” she says. “You don’t have to trap or tranquilize or stress out the animal. You can just follow them around and then collect and analyze their scat.”

Tara Wilson

It didn’t take Wilson long to get into the swing of things at SEFS, and she’s already looking ahead to a graduate degree.

The material they isolate enables scientists to explore a wide range of questions, says Wilson, and there are numerous applications for the research. In one case, an oil company in Alberta, Canada, is having the lab analyze caribou scat from oil sands to make sure the oil drilling isn’t endangering the health of the caribou population.

For Wilson, her lab and course work have quickly cultivated a strong career interest in conservation work, and she’s decided to focus on the wildlife conservation option as an Environmental Science and Resource Management (ESRM) major. Her favorite courses so far have been a class on Pacific Northwest ecosystems with Professor Emeritus Tom Hinckley, and also “Wildlife Biology and Conservation” with Professor Emeritus Dave Manuwal. “You could just tell [Professor Manuwal] is passionate about what he does, and he’s excited to get us passionate.”

She’s been so excited about school, in fact, that Wilson says she feels “like a big dork” for all the lectures and seminars she wants to attend around campus. “I’m the first one in my family to go to college, so sometimes I feel a little embarrassed because I’m very much a kid in a candy store here!”

Hard to blame her, as the pickin’s are good at SEFS when it comes to course offerings and research opportunities. Indeed Wilson is already looking ahead to potential graduate programs at UW, and she’s keeping an open mind about where her studies might lead her. “Anything I can do to help wildlife conservation,” she says. “I’d be thrilled to be part of that community in any way.”

Photos © Tara Wilson.

ESRM Students Volunteer at Beaver Pond

Beaver PondEarlier this quarter, students in Professor Rob Harrison’s “ESRM 100: Environmental Science” course volunteered at the Beaver Pond Natural Area in Seattle. Working with Ruth Williams, the volunteer organizer, the students removed invasive plants and planted some native species.

Most ESRM 100 students complete a volunteer project as part of the course requirements, which include writing up a summary of their work, including the species they worked with, why they did the work, any problems they encountered, solutions they employed, and environmental benefits of doing their particular project.

For many, says Professor Harrison, the project is the first time they’ve done anything like this kind of restoration work outside—and they enjoy it so much that it often leads to additional environmental service volunteering!

Photo © Rob Harrison.

A Friday Tour of the ONRC

ONRC

Derric Kettel, Ellen Matheny and Theresa Santman at ONRC.

This past Friday, I drove out with Professor Aaron Wirsing to visit and tour the Olympic Natural Resources Center (ONRC) in Forks, Wash. My goal was to learn more about the center and spotlight some of its facilities for research and education within the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences (SEFS). Professor Wirsing was on hand to shadow the “ESRM 351: Wildlife Research Techniques” class, which Professor Steve West was leading out to spend two days and nights conducting field research on the Olympic Peninsula—using ONRC as the perfect staging ground for lodging, dining, frog hunts, bird walks, newt and salamander searches, stream surveys and a range of other hands-on activities.

It takes about 3.5 hours to reach ONRC from the Seattle campus, depending on your luck with timing the Kingston ferry. When we arrived, the rain was lashing, so we quickly ducked indoors and met our extremely welcoming hosts: Ellen Matheny, education and outreach director; Theresa Santman, manager of program operations, and Deric Kettel, who’s overseen general maintenance of ONRC since its first days in the mid-1990s.

They walked us through ONRC’s incredibly versatile facility, which features a host of lab and conference spaces, a library, social and dining hall with an indoor/outdoor fireplace, dormitories and larger apartments (brimming with ESRM students later that evening), classroom space for distance learning, and even a two-mile walking trail around the property, which locals in Forks use regularly—and who are sure to call in for help whenever there’s a tree or other blockage across the trail!

Depending on the type of event or activity, ONRC provides terrific space for conferences and other professional gatherings; day and overnight trips for class field study; graduate students looking for space to conduct or complete research projects; staging grounds for other projects and meetings; even social events (weddings and reunions are fairly common). The setting is a small field atop a forested hill overlooking Forks and the surrounding area. Tall hemlocks ring the clearing, which is a popular elk grazing ground, and even with the rain and typical cloud cover, huge windows keep the inside feeling bright and cozy. We left excited thinking about more ways we could integrate SEFS classes and research opportunities at ONRC.

Find out how you can get involved and take advantage of this great research and learning center—and the next time you’re in the area, make sure to stop by and visit!

Photo © Karl Wirsing/SEFS.

Undergrad Spotlight: Sarra Tekola

If you want to see fierce incarnate, just ask Sarra Tekola to recite one of her poems—particularly a recent piece about climate change—and see if you don’t get tingles. You can feel her passion burn through every word.

Sarra Tekola

Sarra Tekola has her hands in scores of activities around campus.

“I’ve been accused to being an environmental evangelist before,” says Tekola, a junior at the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences (SEFS), “but you never want to be too overbearing. It’s important not to push people away. There’s a happy medium with not being so extreme, and if we want to do something about climate change, we need to include everyone. Because it isn’t just a political agenda. It’s a global issue that every single person on this Earth needs to become involved in and do something about.”

Poetry plays into Tekola’s desire to make science more accessible and accepted. She doesn’t want to be a scientist who mostly talks to other scientists; she wants to be actively connected to her community and the public. Even when we have an abundance of evidence—as with ocean acidification and climate change, she says—there’s often a disconnect when trying to galvanize the community to accept and act on the available science. “I want to be able to relate to people and help find solutions to climate change, to be able to persuade people and politicians, to convince them.”

With verse, she gets to practice her art of persuasion when she’s reading poems at an “open mic” night on campus, where she often addresses different audiences and perspectives. “I get to talk to people I might not meet at a restoration event or seminar,” she says.

Another of her tactics for fighting climate change denial is connecting collaborators. So far, she’s set up a Facebook page called “Climate Change Crisis Council,” and she hopes to grow the page into a forum where activists, scientists and environmentalists share ideas, opportunities for environmental involvement and research, and also build networks to find solutions for climate change. (If you’re interested in joining, it’s an open group, and you can contact Tekola via that page). Her plan is to build enough momentum to form a campus club that would get students involved in environmental research, work on public outreach and complete sustainability projects at UW through the Campus Sustainability Fund.

Sarra Tekola

One of Tekola’s projects is to mitigate run-off from a gravel road into a salmon stream near her parent’s home in Maple Valley.

Organizing the Climate Change Crisis Council is only the tip of the iceberg for Tekola’s campus activities. In fact, you might be forgiven for thinking she cloned herself when you realize all the research projects she shoehorns into her schedule.

Tekola, whom you might see riding her motorcycle around campus (she drives it to reduce her carbon footprint; she gets 75 mpg!), was born in Seattle and grew up in nearby Maple Valley. She began her college career at Green River Community College in Auburn, Wash., and transferred to the University of Washington (UW) to start her junior year this past fall. She’s now working toward a major in Environmental Science and Resource Management (ESRM), and she’s been sopping up the program’s research opportunities and field trips.

“I like that it’s really hands-on here,” she says. “I had taken a number of environmental courses, but most of them were textbook-based.” It’s one thing to learn about equipment in the classroom and interpret data others have recorded. “But going out in the field and using the equipment, and being able to do it with your own hands—that’s really fun.”

A few weeks ago, Tekola got her hands plenty cold and dirty in Yellowstone National Park as part of the annual spring course, “ESRM 459: Wildlife Conservation in Northwest Ecosystems.”

With a crew of three SEFS faculty members and 15 students, and using the northern Rockies as their staging ground, Tekola’s class explored patterns of corvid distribution, elk anti-predator behavior and wolf vigilance, among other research tasks. “It was awesome,” she says. “The Yellowstone trip is something I’d want to do on my own, and to be able to do it for school was really amazing. We got to see a lot of cool things.”

The “coolest,” she says, was when they got to watch—from a safe distance—a wolf pack attacking four bull elk. Three of the elk still had their antlers, but one didn’t, and the wolves had separated him from the others. One wolf ran out ahead and tried to bring down the elk, drawing blood on the run, and Tekola was sure the elk was going to fall. Yet the wounded bull stayed on its feet and staggered into the freezing Lamar River with two other elk, where the three lined up, rump to rump, staring at the wolves on the banks (the wolves wouldn’t enter the icy water, apparently, to avoid water freezing in their paws and injuring them; the warmer months are a different story). The fourth elk had turned to face the wolves, which feinted in and out at him, but the bull managed to ward them off with antlers brandished for about 20 minutes. The wolves ultimately gave up and retreated. It was an incredible display of survival tactics that worked—this time—and the class had front-row seats to the show.

Sarra Tekola

Tekola and other ESRM students investigate an elk kill site in Yellowstone National Park.

On another afternoon, they were heading out to investigate a recent wolf kill site. The elk carcass was only two days old, and Tekola remembers several students asking if they might be disturbing the site—or risk interrupting wolves at meal time. Their answer came right on cue: When they walked within 300 or 400 meters of the kill, a wolf was gnawing on the carcass, and binocular range was as close as they got to the carnage.

These field experiences have been a feast for Tekola, a research hound who’s been devouring every opportunity since she transferred from Green River Community College. “I always try to tell my friends and peers and people in the field what a great opportunity we have here at UW,” she says, “and how they should get involved in research as much as they can.”

Thanks to that hunger, her list of involvements is long and varied.

As part of Professor Tim Essington’s lab at the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Tekola is studying hypoxia in the Hood Canal in Puget Sound. Her research includes seeing how fish are adapting to naturally occurring hypoxia. “It’s been a really fun project, especially dissecting stomachs and trying to identify the contents,” she says.

Tekola is also interning with Friends of the Cedar River Watershed, a nonprofit whose work impacts her hometown. The Cedar River forms in North Bend, eventually flows through Maple Valley and out into the bottom of Lake Washington in Renton. “I sometimes help them write grants or lead restoration projects,” says Tekola, and she especially enjoys sharing how the river contributes to the larger Lake Washington watershed, and also salmon spawning and habitat. “It’s my connection to the community.”

Sarra Tekola

“If time wasn’t such a limiting factor,” says Tekola, “I’d be involved in more stuff!”

For another project she’s spearheading close to home, Tekola recently scored a prestigious scholarship to help complete her research and final year at UW.

In Maple Valley, her parents live on a gravel hill in a rural area. Anytime it rains heavily, the run-off washes into a nearby salmon stream. Tekola’s plan is to create a rain garden to reduce the run-off and protect the stream, and in her spare moments she’s already started monitoring sediment and run-off in her test zone. But the project got a major boost recently when Tekola was awarded a one-year scholarship from the United Negro College Fund and the Merck Company Foundation for the 2013-14 academic year.

The 2013 UNCF-Merck Undergraduate Science Research Scholarship Award will provide Tekola up to $30,000 in funding to cover her independent research expenses, a summer internship and tuition for her senior year. It’s big honor—one of only 15 nationally!—and helps ensure that Tekola can keep pursuing her many ideas and inspirations.

About the only thing slowing her down, in fact, is the turn of a minute hand.

“If time wasn’t such a limiting factor,” she says, “I’d be involved in more stuff!”

Photos of Sarra Tekola © Sarra Tekola; photo of elk kill site © Professor Aaron Wirsing/SEFS. 

SEFS Students Descend on Yellowstone

Yellowstone

Clear blue skies greeted the research crew on a morning snowshoe hike to a wolf kill site in the Lamar Valley.

Before the crack of dawn this past Saturday morning, March 23, a caravan set off on the long, long drive to Gardiner, Mont., at the edge of Yellowstone National Park. On board were 15 students and three faculty members from the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences (SEFS), all heading out to spend roughly a week of field study in the northern Rockies as part of a spring course, “ESRM 459: Wildlife Conservation in Northwest Ecosystems.”

Led by SEFS Professors John Marzluff, Monika Moskal and Aaron Wirsing, the group will be using the Northern Range of Yellowstone National Park, between Gardiner and Cooke City, as a staging area to explore patterns of corvid, and especially raven, distribution; elk anti-predator behavior (vigilance); and wolf predation. The class also addresses regional management issues, including wolves and bison leaving the park.

It’s a glorious time to be trekking through the Yellowstone backcountry. The group has special access to remote research areas, tourists are few and far between, scores of bison are out hoofing through the snow, and students occasionally catch glimpses of wolves, grizzlies and other wilderness gems.

Yellowstone

Professor John Marzluff helps orient students during their first full day in the park.

Of course, it’s a working research visit, and students spend long days trudging through the park—often at the mercy of the elements, which at this time of year can be ornery, if not downright savage. Then, after they return to campus on March 30, they begin working on group projects based on data collected. They will present their findings to the public at the end of spring quarter.

But even in the worst weather conditions, when even your expedition thermals can feel threadbare and drafty, how could you say no to this kind of hands-on experience in the wilds of Yellowstone?

Photos of Yellowstone trip © Monika Moskal/SEFS.

Join the Pack Forest Summer Crew!

2012 Pack Forest Summer Crew

The 2012 Pack Forest Summer Crew. See all those smiling faces? That could be you!

Every summer, several SEFS students head down to Pack Forest for two months of hands-on, bareknuckle field training in forest management. Well, “bareknuckle” might be overstating the labor, but summer crew members definitely get their fingernails grubby and get to spend hours in the woods on a beautiful plot of land!

As an intern, your weekends are generally free, so you can venture to a number of local attractions, including nearby Mount Rainier. On top of that, you’ll receive 5 ESRM credit hours to go with a $200 weekly stipend and free housing.

For the 2013 Summer Quarter, which runs from June 24 to August 23, there are five internship positions available.

Four spots are open for Forest Resource Management Interns, who will assist with the management and stewardship of Pack Forest’s timber resources, research installations, roads and trails. These students will develop forest mensuration skills, practice species identification, participate in research programs, and learn about sustainable forest management.

One additional position is available for an Outreach & Education Intern, who will actively participate in public outreach, environmental education and natural resource management. This student will develop skills in communications, public outreach and curriculum development, as well as gain exposure to natural resource management.

To apply, send your resume and a cover letter describing how the internship will fit into your program of study to Professor Greg Ettl.

Applications must be received by April 9, so act fast!

Undergrad Spotlight: Max Sugarman

Max Sugarman

Max Sugarman sizes up the local wildlife in South Africa.

This past fall, Max Sugarman, who grew up in Issaquah, Wash., strayed far from the familiarity of the forested Pacific Northwest and spent a semester studying abroad on the sprawling grasslands of the South African savanna.

“Coming from a forestry-focused program [at UW], it was incredibly different,” says Sugarman, a junior Environmental Science and Resource Management major at the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences. “The savanna is much more vast, it’s a different climate with different ecosystem drivers and forces, and there’s a lot of megafauna and biodiversity you don’t really encounter here.”

The study abroad program Sugarman chose, “South Africa Semester: African Ecology & Conservation,” is run through Duke University and the Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS). Founded in 1963, OTS is a nonprofit consortium dedicated to the study of tropical biology and ecosystems. It has grown to include 63 universities, including the University of Washington, and research institutions from Australia, Latin America and the United States.

As part of the Duke program, Sugarman joined a group of 25 students from August to December for 100 days of research in different savanna ecosystems. Their group was based in Kruger National Park, but they ventured to a number of other sites around the country, including Cape Town and some small villages. “We covered a whole swath of South Africa,” he says.

Baboons

Baboons!

And they didn’t go about their work leisurely. Sugarman says the program was highly intensive, often with eight hours of lecture followed by several full days in the field—rising at 5:30 a.m.—to learn through inquiry and observation. Their primary work during the semester included two projects where they’d develop a question and then carry out the research and analysis in the field. “It was almost entirely hands-on,” he says, “and there was a lot of time to embrace the savanna.”

When they weren’t in the classroom or in the field working, the students occasionally got to go on game drives through the national parks. They’d regularly see baboons, elephants, rhinos and all sorts of incredible creatures, and Sugarman says the savanna landscape actually turned him into a birder.

The fast pace of the program was a challenge, however, as was living in close quarters with his classmates, comprised of 22 Americans and three South Africans. Sometimes they’d stay in upscale quarters; other times they’d be in dorms with 12 to a room; and rarely were there idle moments.

Sugarman

A leopard lounges in Kruger National Park.

At the same time, Sugarman says the small group size and close contact with professors were also some of the program’s greatest strengths.  They had four faculty members for 25 students, as well as a logistics manager and several other support staff. “The really cool thing about the program,” says Sugarman, “is that because you have such a good connection with the faculty, you’re able to mold the program to whatever you want it to be. People there are trying to help you learn and succeed, and you’ll have these professors as long-time supporters.”

Sound like something you’d like to try? Sugarman says the price can look a little daunting on paper, but the program was generous with funding aid and assistance—and he will be the first to recommend it.

“On a personal growth level, it was really invigorating and motivated me to come back to the U.S. and lead a vibrant life,” he says. “On the professional side, going out and doing field research, working with cool faculty, meeting leaders in the field in South Africa and around the world—it has me thinking of doing graduate work in landscape ecology.”

Photos © Max Sugarman.

The Water Seminar: Water, Soils and Watersheds

Water Seminar 2013We’re already four weeks into the Water Seminar and Environmental Science and Resource Management Seminar series (ESRM 429), but there are still six presentations remaining, starting this Tuesday, February 5! The focus this Winter Quarter is “Water, Soils and Watersheds,” and the presenters represent outside partners as well as several schools within the College of the Environment and broader university community.

The seminars are open to the public and are held Tuesday mornings from 8:30 to 9:20 a.m. in Anderson 223. So mark your calendars for the dates below!

(Contact SEFS Professor Darlene Zabowski or Lynn Khuat with questions about the seminars.)

February 5
How Watershed Complexity Promotes Sustainability of Freshwater Resources to People and Wildlife
Daniel Schindler, SAFS/Department of Biology

February 12
Serving Multiple Ends: Water and Urban Design
Nancy Rottle, Landscape Architecture

February 19
Sustained Productivity Along Subarctic River Systems Explained by Biological Nitrogen Fixation
Tom DeLuca, SEFS Director

February 26
What New Learning Tells Us About the Efficacy of Riparian Forest Practice Regulations
Kevin Ceder and Mark Teply, Cramer Fish Sciences

March 5
Tsunami Impacts Past and Present: Water Where It isn’t Wanted
Jody Bourgeois, Earth & Space Sciences

March 12
Brightwater: A Wastewater Treatment System for the Future
Stan Hummel, King County

Korena Mafune Receives Dean’s Award for Undergraduate Innovation

Korena Mafune

Korena Mafune collecting canopy soil samples last spring along the Queets River.

On December 18, 2012, Korena Mafune was officially named the very first recipient of the Dean’s Award for Undergraduate Innovation. Selected by the University of Washington College of the Environment Scholarship Committee, Mafune will receive $1,000 for research materials and supplies, and a $1,500 scholarship for tuition and fees, for a $2,500 total award.

Mafune, a senior Environmental Science and Resource Management major in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences (SEFS), says the award will allow her to continue exploring her growing fascination with soil and plant ecology.

“While collecting and analyzing samples and data on my current capstone project—analyzing microbial communities in prairie restoration plots—I developed a strong interest for fungal associations, specifically mycorrhizal associations,” she says. “Thanks to the great opportunity provided by the Dean’s award, I will now be able to further my interests and expand the scope of my capstone project. It is an honor to be granted the award. Not only will it allow me to enhance my knowledge in the field, but it will allow us to become familiar with the (mostly) unknown mycorrhizal fungal communities on the prairie restoration plots.”

The Dean’s Award for Undergraduate Innovation funds are competitively awarded to support College of the Environment undergraduates engaged in research, as well as community-based projects or experiential learning, combining academic content and skillset learning with innovative applications to particular issues or problems within an environmental context. These funds are designed to support students not just in completing the level of projects they might already be required to complete for their degree programs, but also in taking their projects to a higher level, significantly adding to the depth, quality, creativity and impact of their work.

The research funding, to be administered by Professor John Bakker, Mafune’s faculty advisor at SEFS, will be dispersed in Winter Quarter 2013.

Congratulations, Korena, on this terrific achievement!

Photo © Korena Mafune.