UW Climate Change Video Awards: Announcing the Winners!

Last Friday, June 2, we rolled out the red carpet for the 2017 UW Climate Change Video Awards at Town Hall Seattle. And, wow, what a great show! The evening featured a keynote from Dr. Peter Kareiva, Ashley Ahearn as the emcee, lively discussion among our four judges and student finalists, and of course the main event with the screening of the top six videos from the contest!

Ashley Ahearn with the grand prize winner, Tiamo Minard from Roosevelt High School.

We had challenged high school students across the state of Washington produce a two-minute ad that could convince a climate change skeptic to take action, and all six finalists produced excellent videos. After an incredibly close vote among the judges, the $5,000 grand prize went to Tiamo Minard from Roosevelt High School in Seattle! The $1,000 prize for the runner-up went to the team of Saron Almaw, Hani Ghebrehiwet, Brittaney Hong, Kristen Nguyen and Jasmine Pel from Lynnwood High School in Bothell, and the third-place prize of $500 went to Hazel Cramer, also from Lynnwood High School. Congratulations to all of you!

In addition to the cash prizes, we are especially excited to share that TheFilmSchool Seattle generously donated scholarships to the winners for its summer 3-Week Screenwriting & Filmmaking Intensive, which runs from July 16 to August 5! First place scored a full $3,000 scholarship, and second and third place received an impressive $1,500 and $1,000 scholarship, respectively. It’s an incredible opportunity for these young filmmakers!

© Hannah Letinich

The team of Jorge Zuñiga, Dane Siegelman and Johnny Suh from Bothell High School.

We want to congratulate the other three finalists, including Annie Hager from Mount Si High School, Taylor Langager from Lynnwood High School, and the team of Dane Siegelman, Johnny Suh and Jorge Zuñiga from Bothell High School. They, and so many of the students who participated in the contest this year, poured enormous passion, effort and creativity into their videos, and we can’t thank you enough for the thought and care you put into addressing this critical issue.

We’d also like to thank everyone who joined us for the show; The Nature Conservancy for hosting an informational table at Town Hall during the event; the Northwest Film Forum for urging all the finalists to consider entering the 2018 Seattle Children’s Film Festival; our fantastic emcee and keynote; and our judges—Laura Jean Cronin, Dr. Melanie Harrison Okoro, Cody Permenter and Ethan Steinman—who shouldered the weighty task of selecting winners from such a brilliant line-up. Thank you!

With that, we encourage you to enjoy a gallery of photos from the evening, courtesy of photographer Hannah Letinich, and then grab some popcorn to watch the videos of all six finalists!

Photos © Hannah Letinich.

© Hannah Letinich

2017 UW Climate Change Video Awards: Meet the Judges!

Submissions have been rolling in during the past week, and today is the deadline for the 2017 UW Climate Change Video Contest. After we collect all the videos, we’ll turn them over to our panel of four judges to determine the finalists, which we’ll screen at the UW Climate Change Video Awards on Friday, June 2, 7 to 9 p.m. at Town Hall Seattle!

For the contest this year, we challenged high school students across the state of Washington to create a two-minute ad that will convince a climate change skeptic to take action—with a top prize of $5,000, $1,000 for second and $500 for third. We can’t wait to see how students tackled this prompt, and we’re excited to introduce the distinguished judges who’ll determine the winning videos!

Laura Jean Cronin

Laura Jean Cronin
Laura Jean Cronin has written, directed and produced an array of award-winning short films that played in festivals worldwide, including John Gill, 2000, Block Party, Leave It, Free Parking, Arthur and One Night. Laura Jean also works as a freelance 1st assistant director in the local Indie film and television industry and teaches video production skills to kids and teens at Reel Grrls, an after-school program that gives youth the tools to succeed as leaders through media production. She has recently wrapped Season Six of the Emmy Award-winning PBS show Biz Kid$, where she served as line producer. Currently, Laura Jean is a producer and director at B47 Studios in Seattle.

Melanie HarrisonDr. Melanie Harrison Okoro
Melanie is a water quality specialist and the aquatic invasive species coordinator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Fisheries, West Coast Region. She earned her doctorate in environmental science from the University of Maryland Baltimore County, and her research focuses on water quality impacts to federally listed threatened and endangered species. Her passions include mentoring youth as a Big Sister in the San Francisco Bay Big Brothers Big Sister Program, and being an advocate for increasing diversity in STEM fields through her involvement with the American Association of University Women in Davis, Calif.

Cody PermenterCody Permenter
Cody is the social media manager at Seattle-based Grist.org, a nonprofit environmental news organization for people who want “a planet that doesn’t burn and a future that doesn’t suck.” Before joining Grist, Cody helped lead the social media efforts at viral news site Cheezburger.com and has been published in publications like Thrillist, The Daily Dot and USA Today. He has served on the nominating board for the Shorty Awards for the past three years, an awards program honoring the best of social media in the entertainment industry, and he studied multimedia journalism at the University of Texas at Austin.

Ethan SteinmanEthan Steinman
Ethan is an Emmy-nominated filmmaker and owner of the Seattle-based media production company, Daltonic Films. As a producer and director, he has worked over the past two decades on programming for a wide range of media outlets, including NBC, FOX, Comedy Central, Discovery Channel and A&E. During the past several years, he has produced original content for Al Jazeera English, FOX Sports, CNN, Adidas and Major League Soccer, and he directed two award-winning feature-length documentaries, including Glacial Balance, which explores the effects of climate change on Andean glaciers and the people who depend on them for survival.

***

The award show and screening is free and open to the public, and we hope you’ll join us to celebrate these talented students!

2016 Climate Change Video Awards: Announcing the Winners!

We hosted our second UW Climate Change Video Awards last Saturday, May 14, at Town Hall in Seattle, and it was quite a show!

From our emcee, stand-up economist Yoram Bauman, to our fantastic judges—Dean Lisa J. Graumlich, Paul D. Miller (aka DJ Spooky) and Ethan Steinman—to all of the students, families and friends who came out to watch, we couldn’t have asked for a more positive and inspiring evening. Also, one of the team members on the second-place winner for the undergraduate category, Ben Jensen, is a student in our Environmental Science and Resource Management program!

Yuna Shin, from Henry M. Jackson High School in Bothell, won first prize in the high school category—good for $5,000!

Yuna Shin, from Henry M. Jackson High School in Bothell, won first prize in the high school category—good for $5,000!

Hannah Letinich, our photographer for the show, captured a wonderful range of shots from the evening, so we encourage you to take a look at her gallery (download any images you’d like for free, but please give Hannah credit if you post or share them online anywhere). We’ll be working on getting the winning videos up online to share soon, as well, and in the meantime, below are this year’s finalists and winners.

A huge congratulations to all of them, and to everyone who submitted a video for this year’s contest. These students poured so much time and creativity into these films, and they give us tremendous hope for the future of environmental leadership.

High School

First Place: Yuna Shin, Henry M. Jackson High School, Bothell – $5,000
Second Place: Suraj Buddhavarapu, Naveen Sahi, Allison Tran and Vibha Vadlamani, Tesla STEM High School, Redmond – $1,000
Third Place: Luke Brodersen, Shorewood High School, Shoreline – $500

Other finalists: Julci Areza, Chloe Birney and Tanaya Sardesai from Redmond High School in Redmond, and Aria Ching, Jesselynn Noland, Emily Riley and Emily Weaver from Lynnwood High School in Bothell.

Undergraduate

First Place: Audrey Seda and Tommy Tang, Eastern Washington University and University of Washington – Bothell – $5,000
Second Place: Ben Jensen, Charles Johnson and Anthony Whitfield, University of Washington – $1,000
Third Place: Aaron Hecker, University of Washington – $500

Other finalists: Kennedy McGahan from Gonzaga University, and Malea Saul, Madeline Savage and Bethany Shepler from the University of Washington.

***

Special thanks to the Denman Endowment for Student Excellence in Forest Resources for funding the contest.

Photos © Hannah Letinich.

Aaron Hecker, who won third place in the undergraduate category.

Aaron Hecker, who won third place in the undergraduate category, is a student at the University of Washington.

2016 UW Climate Change Video Awards: Meet the Judges!

Last year, our first-ever UW Climate Change Video Contest was such a success that we decided we had to do it again. So this winter and spring, we once again challenged high school and undergraduate students in the state of Washington to grab a camera and show us what climate change means to them in three minutes or less. The submissions are in, the finalists reviewed and selected—and now the reel fun begins!

Join us at Town Hall on Saturday, May 14, from 7 to 9 p.m. for a public screening of the top five video entries in each category—high school and undergraduate—and see who takes home the grand prize of $5,000, as well as $1,000 for second and $500 for third. A renowned panel of judges will be on hand to announce the winners and discuss the student’s work, and it’s going to be a great show!

We hope you’ll join us in recognizing these incredibly talented students. The screening and award ceremony is free and open to the public, and doors open at 6 p.m. Register now!

Meet the Judges

2016_05_Yoram for blogYoram Bauman (Judge and emcee)
An environmental economist, writer and comedian, Yoram Bauman earned a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Washington in 2003 and now performs as the “world’s first and only stand-up economist.” He’s shared the stage with everyone from the late Robin Williams to Paul Krugman, and he has appeared in TIME Magazine and on PBS and NPR. He’s the founder and co-chair of Carbon Washington, a grassroots campaign to bring a revenue-neutral carbon tax (I-732) to Washington, and he is also the co-author of The Cartoon Introduction to Climate Change.

2016_05_DJ Spooky for blogPaul D. Miller, aka DJ Spooky
Paul D. Miller is a composer, multimedia artist and writer. He has created many works based on his travels to the Arctic and Antarctic, including multimedia stage works: “Arctic Rhythms,” “Check Your Math,” “Terra Nova: Sinfonia Antarctica”; art exhibition “Ice Music”; and The Book of Ice, a graphic book that explores the impact of climate change on Antarctica through the prism of digital media and contemporary music.

Some of his recent projects include “Heart of a River,” a composition that looks at water, cities, climate change and music in India, and “Heart of a Forest,” a symphony about forests and the future (premiering May 18 at Oregon State University). You can follow him on Twitter at @djspooky.

2016_05_Lisa Graumlich for blogDean Lisa Graumlich
Dr. Lisa J. Graumlich, Virginia and Prentice Bloedel Professor, is the inaugural dean of the College of the Environment at the University of Washington. As dean, she leads a college with unparalleled depth and breadth in environmental systems: from the forests to the seas, and from the depths of the Earth to the edges of the solar system. As a scholar, Graumlich pioneered the use of tree-ring data to understand long-term trends in climate, focusing on the mountains of western North America. She is actively engaged with a broad range of stakeholders to understand the impacts of climate change on wilderness and natural areas.

2016_05_Ethan for blogEthan Steinman
Ethan Steinman launched his career in film and television in 1995, and the Emmy-nominated filmmaker opened his Seattle-based media production company, Daltonic Films, in 2013. As a producer and director, he has worked on programming for a wide range of stations, including NBC, FOX, Comedy Central, Discovery Channel and A&E. During the past several years, he has produced original content for Al Jazeera English, FOX Sports, CNN, Adidas and Major League Soccer, and he directed two award-winning documentaries, including Glacial Balance, which explores the effects of climate change on Andean glaciers and the people who depend on them for survival.

SEFS Seminar (10/21): How to Shoot Usable Video of Your Research

Among the challenges of field research, particularly when you’re operating alone or on a limited budget, is finding a way to capture your work visually—not just as a record, but as a vehicle of science communication to help convey the value and nature of your project to broader audiences. Most of our students and faculty are not trained videographers, after all, and few of us have the time or equipment to set up sophisticated filming operations on the go. So even if you don’t have high-end tools or training, can you still collect powerful footage of your work?

Ethan Steinman

Ethan Steinman

Absolutely, says Producer/Director Ethan Steinman of Daltonic Films, who will be giving a special workshop next Wednesday, October 21, as part of the SEFS Seminar Series: “Documenting Science: How to Shoot Usable Video of Your Research.”

Steinman’s talk is designed for student and faculty researchers and will run from 3:30 to 4:20 p.m. in Anderson 223. He has offered to stick around afterward, as well, to help with questions about specific equipment or projects (in case you need tips about recording on your smartphone with a mini-tripod, for instance). The seminar is free and open to all students, staff and faculty at the University of Washington, so bring your gear and take advantage of this great workshop!

About the Talk
The workshop’s focus is to teach scientists the inexpensive and effective methods of recording their own quality media in the field. Rather than fighting for high budgets or hiring someone to film, Steinman will talk about the methods a filmmaker uses to key in on a subject and shoot an array of footage that can be edited after research is complete to complement research papers and assist in public outreach.

About the Speaker
Steinman launched his career in film and television in 1995. Over the years, he has worked on programming for NBC, FOX and Comedy Central, commercial projects for clients including Dodge, Burger King, Capri Sun, Mercedes, Nike, Ford, Nissan, Pepsi, BMW, Novartis and Unilever, and produced series for Discovery Channel, Discovery Health and A&E.

From 2002 to 2011, Steinman lived between Paris, France, and Buenos Aires and Mendoza in Argentina to broaden his vision and to present himself with new challenges. During the past several years, he has directed the award-winning documentaries, Tesoros Descartados and Glacial Balance, as well as original content for Al Jazeera English, CNN, Adidas and Major League Soccer.

He now resides in Seattle.

SEFS Seminar Series: Fall 2015 Schedule!

The schedule is set for the SEFS Seminar Series this fall, and we’ve pulled together an especially diverse line-up, ranging from a hands-on workshop about capturing great video of your field research, to talks about drones, the Northwest Forest Plan, resource management in southwest China, and much more!

Held on Wednesdays from 3:30 to 4:20 p.m. in Anderson 223, the talks are always open to the public, and the first seminar of each month will be followed by a casual reception down the hall in the Forest Club Room. Students can register for course credit under SEFS 529A.

Check out the schedule below and join us for as many talks as you can!

2015_Fall_SEFS Seminar Series PosterWeek 1: September 30
“The Trees By the Stream are Your Uncle: Traditional Knowledge and Resource Management in Southwest China”
Professor Stevan Harrell, SEFS/Anthropology

Week 2: October 7* (Distinguished Alumni Speaker)
“Integrated Pest Management Application to Future Forest Health”
Will Littke, Retired Forest Health Researcher, Weyerhaeuser

Week 3: October 14
“Constraints and Drivers of Bark Beetle Outbreaks: And How We’ve Made a Difficult Lifestyle Easier”
Professor Ken Raffa, University of Wisconsin

Week 4: October 21
“How to Shoot Usable Video of your Research”
Ethan Steinman, Producer/Director, Daltonic Films

Week 5: October 28 
“Climate Change Adaptation on Federal Lands in the Western U.S.”
Dr. Jessica Halofsky, Research Ecologist, Pacific Wildland Fire Sciences Lab

Week 6: November 4*
“What Do Faculty Know About Undergraduate Curricula? Some Insights From Faculty Leadership at UW”
Michelle Trudeau, Director, SEFS Student & Academic Services

Week 7: November 11
No Seminar (Holiday)

Week 8: November 18
“Nature’s Services: Advancing Frontiers in the Communication, Science and Practice of Ecosystem Services”
Dr. Anne Guerry, The Natural Capital Project

Week 9: November 25
No Seminar (Thanksgiving)

Week 10: December 2 *
“To Drone or Not to Drone: UAS for Ecological Applications”
Professor Monika Moskal, SEFS

Week 11: December 9
“Real Changes? 20-year Interpretation of the Northwest Forest Plan”
Professor Bernard Bormann, SEFS

* Indicates reception after seminar