Evening Talks at ONRC: Tom Rosmond

This coming Friday, January 17, at 6:30 p.m., the Olympic Natural Resources Center in Forks, Wash., will be hosting the fourth installment of its new speaker series, Evening Talks at ONRC.

Evening Talks at ONRC

The ONRC campus just outside of Forks, Wash.

This month, ONRC is pleased to welcome Tom Rosmond, a consultant for the Naval Research Laboratory, Marine Meteorology Division. In his talk, “An Introduction to Modern Weather Prediction: Is it going to rain or maybe snow?” Rosmond will discuss how modern weather prediction tries to answer this age-old question, and he’ll show some of the science and technology used to support weather predictions. He’ll also discuss the accuracy of today’s weather predictions and suggest ways it could be enhanced and improved.

Rosmond grew up in Forks and graduated from Forks High School. During school breaks, he worked in his family-owned business, Rosmond Brothers Lumber Company, a prolific lumber mill for 38 years that operated on the current site of the 101 Business Park. He later attended the University of Washington, graduating with a bachelor’s and master’s in Oceanography, and a doctoral degree Atmospheric Sciences.

The talk is open to the public, and you are welcome to bring a favorite snack to share—or just eat up the presentation this Friday at 6:30 p.m.!

Evening Talks at ONRC is supported by the Rosmond Forestry Education Fund, an endowment that honors the contributions of Fred Rosmond and his family to forestry and the Forks community. For more information about ONRC or the speaker series, contact Ellen Matheny.

Pileated Woodpeckers in Suburban Seattle?

This Friday, October 18, the Olympic Natural Resources Center (ONRC) in Forks, Wash., will be hosting the second presentation as part of its new monthly speaker series, “Evening Talks at ONRC.”

Jorge Tomasevic

Jorge Tomasevic

Each month, a graduate student or other regional expert will give a public talk to engage members of the Forks and surrounding communities in exciting research projects throughout the state. SEFS graduate student Laurel Peelle kicked off the speaker series on Saturday, September 21, to great success—and an enthusiastic round of questions afterward!

This next event, which will begin at the ONRC campus at 7 p.m., features Jorge Tomasevic for his talk, “A New Neighbor on the Block: Pileated Woodpeckers in Seattle’s Suburban Areas.”

Part of the Wildlife Science Group at SEFS—and currently working toward his Ph.D.—Tomasevic originally came to the United States as a Fulbright Fellow from Chile. From the cold forests of Patagonia to the arid desert of Atacama, from the native forests and struggling exotic pine plantations to the heights of an island in the Pacific Ocean or up high in the Andes, Tomasevic has participated in several research projects dealing with the ecology and conservation of forest birds and endangered species in Chile—and now in the Pacific Northwest.

“Most of us think of the Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) as a mature or even old-growth forest species, right?” says Tomasevic. “That’s why we use them as indicators of forest health. However, they are also using suburban areas in the Greater Seattle region. Why is this? How are they doing? Are they successful, or it is just the remains of a past population that are using what is left of the forest not taken over by housing development?”

Come out this Friday to learn more about what this woodpecker is doing in such an unusual environment!

“Evening Talks at ONRC” is open to the public and is supported by the Rosmond Forestry Education Fund endowment. For more information about the program, contact Ellen Matheny at ematheny@uw.edu or 360.374.4556.

About the Speaker Series
In addition to bringing speakers and interesting research out to ONRC, the speaker series also provides a great opportunity for graduate students to gain experience presenting their research to the public, and to a generally non-scientific audience. For participating speakers, ONRC will cover travel expenses and provide lodging for the night, as well as a stipend of $200. The specific days of the events are flexible, and there will be openings coming up for January, March and May. If you are interested in giving a talk or know someone who would be a great fit for this series, please contact Karl Wirsing!

Photo © Ross Furbush.