SEFS Seminar (10/21): How to Shoot Usable Video of Your Research

Among the challenges of field research, particularly when you’re operating alone or on a limited budget, is finding a way to capture your work visually—not just as a record, but as a vehicle of science communication to help convey the value and nature of your project to broader audiences. Most of our students and faculty are not trained videographers, after all, and few of us have the time or equipment to set up sophisticated filming operations on the go. So even if you don’t have high-end tools or training, can you still collect powerful footage of your work?

Ethan Steinman

Ethan Steinman

Absolutely, says Producer/Director Ethan Steinman of Daltonic Films, who will be giving a special workshop next Wednesday, October 21, as part of the SEFS Seminar Series: “Documenting Science: How to Shoot Usable Video of Your Research.”

Steinman’s talk is designed for student and faculty researchers and will run from 3:30 to 4:20 p.m. in Anderson 223. He has offered to stick around afterward, as well, to help with questions about specific equipment or projects (in case you need tips about recording on your smartphone with a mini-tripod, for instance). The seminar is free and open to all students, staff and faculty at the University of Washington, so bring your gear and take advantage of this great workshop!

About the Talk
The workshop’s focus is to teach scientists the inexpensive and effective methods of recording their own quality media in the field. Rather than fighting for high budgets or hiring someone to film, Steinman will talk about the methods a filmmaker uses to key in on a subject and shoot an array of footage that can be edited after research is complete to complement research papers and assist in public outreach.

About the Speaker
Steinman launched his career in film and television in 1995. Over the years, he has worked on programming for NBC, FOX and Comedy Central, commercial projects for clients including Dodge, Burger King, Capri Sun, Mercedes, Nike, Ford, Nissan, Pepsi, BMW, Novartis and Unilever, and produced series for Discovery Channel, Discovery Health and A&E.

From 2002 to 2011, Steinman lived between Paris, France, and Buenos Aires and Mendoza in Argentina to broaden his vision and to present himself with new challenges. During the past several years, he has directed the award-winning documentaries, Tesoros Descartados and Glacial Balance, as well as original content for Al Jazeera English, CNN, Adidas and Major League Soccer.

He now resides in Seattle.

Wildlife Seminar: Fall 2015 Schedule!

The long-running Wildlife Science Seminar (ESRM 455 & SEFS 554) gets rolling this coming Monday, October 5, and as always the line-up features an incredible range of subjects, from conserving seabirds to coexisting with wolves and cougars in Washington (as well as two speakers yet to be announced). Professor John Marzluff is leading the seminar this fall, and he’ll be kicking off the quarter with the first talk on Monday.

You can catch the action weekly from 3:30 to 4:50 p.m. in Kane Hall 120. The public is welcome, so mark your calendars and come out for some animal intrigue!

Wildlife Science SeminarWeek 1: October 5
“Hot topics in wildlife science”
Professor John Marzluff, Wildlife Science Group, SEFS

Week 2: October 12
“DDT Wars”
Affiliate Professor Charlie Wurster, Wildlife Science Group, SEFS

Week 3: October 19
“A helping hand to nature: humans and cavity-nesting birds along the urban-to-wildland gradient of the Seattle area”
Jorge Tomasevic, doctoral candidate, Wildlife Science Group, SEFS

Week 4: October 26
“Interactions between wolves and deer in a managed landscape in Washington”
Justin Dellinger, doctoral candidate, Wildlife Science Group, SEFS

Week 5: November 2
“Streaked horned lark: The role of research in listing and recovery of an endangered species”
Dr. Scott Pearson, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Week 6: November 9
“Coping in a human-dominated environment: good, bad, or indifferent?”
Dr. Chris Whelan, Illinois Natural History Survey, Champaign, Ill.

Week 7: November 16
“Coexisting with wolves and cougars in Washington”
Carol Bogezi, doctoral candidate, Wildlife Science Group, SEFS

Week 8: November 23
“Conserving seabirds: from islands to hemispheres”
Professor Peter Hodum, University of Puget Sound

Week 9: November 30
Talk TBD

Week 10: December 7
Talk TBD

SEFS Seminar Series: Fall 2015 Schedule!

The schedule is set for the SEFS Seminar Series this fall, and we’ve pulled together an especially diverse line-up, ranging from a hands-on workshop about capturing great video of your field research, to talks about drones, the Northwest Forest Plan, resource management in southwest China, and much more!

Held on Wednesdays from 3:30 to 4:20 p.m. in Anderson 223, the talks are always open to the public, and the first seminar of each month will be followed by a casual reception down the hall in the Forest Club Room. Students can register for course credit under SEFS 529A.

Check out the schedule below and join us for as many talks as you can!

2015_Fall_SEFS Seminar Series PosterWeek 1: September 30
“The Trees By the Stream are Your Uncle: Traditional Knowledge and Resource Management in Southwest China”
Professor Stevan Harrell, SEFS/Anthropology

Week 2: October 7* (Distinguished Alumni Speaker)
“Integrated Pest Management Application to Future Forest Health”
Will Littke, Retired Forest Health Researcher, Weyerhaeuser

Week 3: October 14
“Constraints and Drivers of Bark Beetle Outbreaks: And How We’ve Made a Difficult Lifestyle Easier”
Professor Ken Raffa, University of Wisconsin

Week 4: October 21
“How to Shoot Usable Video of your Research”
Ethan Steinman, Producer/Director, Daltonic Films

Week 5: October 28 
“Climate Change Adaptation on Federal Lands in the Western U.S.”
Dr. Jessica Halofsky, Research Ecologist, Pacific Wildland Fire Sciences Lab

Week 6: November 4*
“What Do Faculty Know About Undergraduate Curricula? Some Insights From Faculty Leadership at UW”
Michelle Trudeau, Director, SEFS Student & Academic Services

Week 7: November 11
No Seminar (Holiday)

Week 8: November 18
“Nature’s Services: Advancing Frontiers in the Communication, Science and Practice of Ecosystem Services”
Dr. Anne Guerry, The Natural Capital Project

Week 9: November 25
No Seminar (Thanksgiving)

Week 10: December 2 *
“To Drone or Not to Drone: UAS for Ecological Applications”
Professor Monika Moskal, SEFS

Week 11: December 9
“Real Changes? 20-year Interpretation of the Northwest Forest Plan”
Professor Bernard Bormann, SEFS

* Indicates reception after seminar