Wildlife Seminar: Fall 2016 Schedule

The Fall 2016 Wildlife Science Seminar kicks off this coming Monday, October 3, and topics range from songbirds in Texas to Cooper’s hawks in Seattle. Professor John Marzluff is leading the seminar this quarter, and you can catch the talks on Mondays from 3:30 to 4:50 p.m. in Kane Hall 120. The public is always welcome, so mark your calendars and come out for some terrific seminars!

(Undergraduate students may register for credit under ESRM 455; graduate students under SEFS 554.)

Wildlife Science SeminarWeek 1: October 3
“Introduction to class and UW crow research”
Dr. John Marzluff
SEFS

Week 2: October 10
“Scavenging as a foraging strategy by peregrine falcons during the nonbreeding period in coastal Washington”
Dr. Daniel Varland
Coastal Raptors, Hoquiam, Wash.

Week 3: October 17
“Woodpeckers and other wildlife issues on a managed forest”
Amber Mount
Wildlife Scientist, Green Diamond Timber Group

Week 4: October 24
“DDT Wars”
Dr. Charlie Wurster
Department of Biology, SUNY, Stony Brook

Week 5: October 31
“Seattle’s amazing adaptable Cooper’s hawks”
Ed Deal
Seattle Cooper’s Hawk Project

Week 6: November 7
“Adventures of a working wildlife conservation biologist: stories and lessons from the field (and office) within the public, private and nonprofit sectors”
Glenn Johnson
Harris Environmental Group, Tacoma, Wash.

Week 7: November 14
“Climate-driven phenological shifts and their consequences”
Dr. John Withey
Graduate Program on the Environment, The Evergreen State College

Week 8: November 21
“Golden eagles in western Washington”
Leif Hansen
SEFS graduate student

Week 9: November 28
“White-eyes and black-caps—how two songbirds respond to the challenges of life in Texas?”
Michael Heimbuch
SEFS graduate student

Week 10: December 5
“American crow thanatology”
Kaeli Swift
SEFS doctoral student

2016 Distinguished Alumni Seminar: Professor Randy Dahlgren

On Wednesday, October 5, we are very pleased to welcome Professor Randy Dahlgren (’84, M.S.; ’87, Ph.D.) from the University of California – Davis to give our annual Distinguished Alumni Seminar: “From Subduction to Salmon: Geologic Subsidies Drive High Productivity of a Volcanic Spring-Fed River.” The talk is open to the public and will run from 3:30 to 4:20 p.m. in Anderson 223.

randy-dahlgrenAbout the Speaker
Randy is a Distinguished Professor of Soil Science and Biogeochemistry in the Department of Land, Air and Water Resources at the University of California – Davis, where he holds the Russell L. Rustici Endowed Chair in Rangeland Watershed Sciences. Randy received his Ph.D. and M.S. in forest soils from SEFS (then the College of Forest Resources), and his B.S. in soil science from North Dakota State University. His research program in biogeochemistry examines the interaction of hydrological, geochemical and biological processes in regulating nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems and surface and ground water chemistry. He is a fellow of the Soil Science Society of America, fellow of the UC Davis Agricultural Sustainability Institute, and has received several awards, including the UCD 2008 Academic Senate Distinguished Teaching Award, 2012 UC Davis Prize for Undergraduate Teaching and Scholarly Achievement (considered the UC-Davis Nobel Prize), and the West Lake Friendship Award from the Governor of Zhejiang Province, China.

About the Talk
Critical habitats necessary to support cold-water species in lotic ecosystems are anticipated to diminish as global climate change reduces summertime availability of cold water in streams. Volcanic spring-fed streams may prove an exception to this habitat loss as large aquifers with high residence times produce reliable stream flow for sustaining cold-water species. Here, we identify a hitherto overlooked exceptionally productive and resilient environment in which large groundwater springs located within volcanic arcs provide consistent cold-water stream flow and ecologically significant nitrogen and phosphorus inputs from geologic sources. In the spring-fed Shasta River of northern California, steelhead trout take advantage of abundant food and stable year-round flow and water temperature regimes to accrue a substantial growth advantage over individuals from an adjacent non-spring-fed stream, exhibiting a six-fold increase in mass and two-fold increase in length. Results demonstrate that geologically derived nutrients in spring-fed streams are driving aquatic ecosystem productivity and resiliency, making these habitats exceptionally important for conserving cold-water species impacted by global climate change.

We are thrilled to welcome Randy for the Distinguished Alumni Seminar, and we hope you’ll be able to join us!

SEFS Seminar Series: Fall 2016 Schedule!

The schedule is set for the Fall 2016 SEFS Seminar Series, and this quarter’s talks are loosely organized around a spatial theme, “Ecosystems, Ecology and Management at Scales.” We’re excited to welcome a wide range of speakers, from new faculty hire Brian Harvey, to a research fellow from Tasmania, to Professor Randy Dahlgren, who will be visiting from UC Davis to give the Distinguished Alumni Seminar.

Held on Wednesdays from 3:30 to 4:20 p.m. in Anderson 223, the talks are always open to the public, and the first seminar of each month will be followed by a casual reception down the hall in the Forest Club Room (or the Salmon BBQ, in the case of the October 5 seminar!). Students can register for course credit under SEFS 529A.

Check out the schedule below and join us for as many talks as you can!

2016_09_fall-2016-posterWeek 1: September 28
“Carbon cycling in the global forest system”
Dr. Tom Crowther
Postdoctoral Research Associate
Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies

Week 2: October 5*
“From subduction to salmon: Geologic subsidies drive high productivity of a volcanic spring-fed river”
Professor Randy Dahlgren
UC Davis

Week 3: October 12
“Putting PNW retention forestry practices into a global context”
Dr. Sue Baker
Research Fellow
University of Tasmania & Forestry Tasmania

Week 4: October 19
“A comparison of low-intensity management options for Douglas-fir dominated forests in western WA”
Professor Greg Ettl
SEFS

Week 5: October 26
“Bring on the heat: How climate change may protect eastern hemlock”
Dr. Angela Mech
Postdoctoral Research Associate
SEFS

Week 6: November 2*
“Avoided impacts on human health by recovering wood residues for bioenergy and bioproducts in the Pacific Northwest”
Professor Indroneil Ganguly
SEFS

Week 7: November 9
“Unlikely hero, or the next to fall? Causes and consequences of subalpine fir mortality in the wake of recent bark beetle outbreaks”
Dr. Brian Harvey
Smith Fellow (and future SEFS faculty member!)

Week 8: November 16
“California spotted owl habitat: New insights from a multiscale analysis from LiDAR data”
Professor Van Kane
SEFS

Week 9: November 30
“Changing fire regimes in eastern Washington: Recent large wildfire events and implications for dry forest management”
Dr. Susan Prichard
SEFS Research Scientist

Week 10: December 7*

“Exploring frequent fire forests at multiple scales”
Dr. Keala Hagmann
Postdoctoral Research Associate
SEFS

* Indicates reception after seminar