2016 Graduate Student Symposium: Submit Your Abstracts!

The 2016 Graduate Student Symposium (GSS) is coming up on Friday, March 4, and the abstract submission period is now open! Students will be able to submit an abstract, via the online form, from Friday, January 29, through Friday, February 12, at 5 p.m. As always, there are a limited number of presentation spots available, so submit your abstract ASAP!

This year’s GSS, which will be held in the Forest Club Room (AND 207), is built around the theme, “The Interface Between Scientific Research and Management.” Many SEFS students seek to build careers in land management or other applied fields, yet we receive most of our formal training in an academic setting. Is our research responding to on-the-ground priorities? How can we improve the dialogue between science, management and other stakeholders? How can we best communicate our results—including variability and uncertainty? A stellar panel of experts will kick off the day to help us grapple with these questions.

Open to the public and everyone in the SEFS community, GSS is a friendly gathering to share your work and hone your presentation skills. You can present a preliminary proposal, your results from a completed project, or anything in between. Presentations last 10 minutes and are followed by 2-3 minutes of Q&A. Undergraduate capstone students will be showing off their research during poster sessions throughout the day. As is tradition, the symposium will be followed by a Dead Elk party—the perfect opportunity to discuss the presentations and posters over food and drinks.

Again, don’t forget to get your abstract submissions in as soon as possible during the next two weeks. And if you have any questions, please email clittlef@uw.edu.

Graduate Student Symposium: March 6!

The 12th annual Graduate Student Symposium (GSS) is set for Friday, March 6, and as always the schedule is packed with great presentations and a panel discussion!

Graduate Student SymposiumOrganized by and for SEFS graduate students, the day-long symposium—held from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. in the Forest Club Room—highlights the research of our graduate students through presentations and a poster session. This year’s theme is “Clear as Mud: Interpreting a Changing Environment,” and presenters will grapple with complex challenges that cross scales, cross boundaries and cross ecosystems—and that cross into the political sphere, too. How do we, as scientists, make sense of it all?

In addition to several poster and presentation sessions, there will be a panel discussion featuring Dr. Dan Donato from the Washington Department of Natural Resources, Dr. Karen Bennett from the U.S. Forest Service, and John Squires from the Pinchot Partners collaborative. And as is tradition, the symposium will be immediately followed by a Dead Elk party, which is perfect for unwinding and rehashing the day’s presentations and posters over food and drinks!

The GSS is an excellent opportunity for students to present to their colleagues and professors, gain valuable experience and feedback, network with professional contacts and alumni, and also learn more about the work other students are doing at SEFS. You can present a preliminary proposal, your results from a completed project, or anything in-between. Presentations should last no more than 10 minutes, with 2-3 minutes for Q&A afterward. Undergraduate capstone students are encouraged to present a poster, too!

If you’d like to take part, abstracts must be submitted online by 5 p.m. on Friday, February 20, so get moving!

Check out the full day’s schedule, and email Caitlin Littlefield if you have any questions.

Graduate Student Symposium Set for March 14!

Coming up on Friday, March 14, is the 11th annual Graduate Student Symposium at the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences (SEFS)! (The original date was moved back two weeks from Feb. 14 due to a scheduling conflict.)

Organized by and for SEFS graduates students, the day-long symposium—held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Forest Club Room—highlights the research of our graduate students through presentations and a poster session. It’s an excellent opportunity for our students to present to their colleagues and professors, gain valuable experience and feedback, network with professional contacts and alumni, and also learn more about the work other students are doing at SEFS. Undergraduates are also encouraged to participate in the poster presentation.

Graduate Student SymposiumThe day’s schedule and full line-up of speakers haven’t been finalized yet, but the symposium usually kicks off with keynote presentations from leaders in the field, followed by graduate student talks and then poster presentations. The Forest Club Room will be a hive of activity and energy all day, and it’s a terrific showcase of the SEFS student community. So get involved and come out and join us on March 14!

If you’d like to submit an abstract for a presentation (graduate students) or a poster (undergraduates), email Brooke Cassell with your abstract by March 1 to ensure your space in the symposium. There will be awards recognizing the best presenters and posters.

For more information, check out the great poster (at left, created by Anna Simpson!) or visit the Graduate Student Symposium site. You can also contact two of the organizers, Luke Dow and Lisa Hannon, with any questions. They’ll be updating the schedule, speakers and other activities as we get closer to the event!

This Friday: Graduate Student Symposium!

Graduate Student SymposiumThe 10th Annual Graduate Student Symposium (GSS) begins bright and early this Friday morning, March 8! It’s an all-day affair from 9 a.m to 5 p.m. in the Forest Club Room, so come early and stick around if you can.

The event kicks off with breakfast and presentations from this year’s panelists, and we are excited to welcome Dale Blahna, a research social scientist with the U.S. Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station; Phil Rigdon, deputy director of natural resources with the Yakama Nation; and Laura Six, a plant ecologist working in international environmental research with Weyerhaeuser.

Following the panel discussions, we will have the main event: our graduate student presentations, along with some special activities this year to celebrate 10 years of GSS. The theme is The Future of Forestry (which of course includes natural resource management, environmental science and the full range of the work we do here at SEFS).

We invite you to join us, relax, enjoy yourself and catch as many sessions as you can. We will be serving a pizza lunch at noon along with the poster presentations. Check out a tentative schedule of events, and we hope to see on Friday!

Graduate Student Symposium: Save the Date!

Graduate Student SymposiumThe date is set—Friday, March 8, 2013—and final details are coming together for the 10th Annual Graduate Student Symposium at the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences (SEFS)!

Held in the Forest Club Room, the annual symposium is a day dedicated to graduate students and their research. It is organized by and for graduate students, with the support of the Xi Sigma Pi Forestry Honor Society.

At this day-long event, we highlight the work of our graduate students through presentations and a poster session. We also invite outside panelists, often SEFS alumni, to present on a topic of interest. Ultimately, the symposium provides graduate students with the opportunity to present to their colleagues and professors, and gain valuable experience and feedback. This year’s theme is the Future of Forestry, so we will be asking panelists questions about what the future holds for the field, and we will hear from our future foresters and researchers at SEFS.

The Graduate Student Symposium runs from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and a tentative schedule of events is now available online. If you are still interested in submitting an abstract for a poster or presentation, please contact Ellen Weir. There will be an award ceremony recognizing the best presenters and posters at the symposium.

So join us on March 8 and celebrate your colleagues’ projects and research, and the success of our field today and for years to come!

For more information, contact Maria Sandercock or Miku Lenentine.