Wildlife Science Seminar: Spring 2014

Starting on Monday, March 31, we kick off enough another quarter of terrific talks as part of the Wildlife Science Seminar! Professor Chris Grue of the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences will be leading the course this spring, and topics range widely from killer whales to bats in the Peruvian Amazon to birds in suburban Seattle.

The Wildlife Seminar will meet on Mondays from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. in Architecture (ARC) Hall, Room 147. Undergraduate students may register for credit under ESRM 455; graduate students under ESRM 554.

The public is invited to attend, so check out the full line-up below and mark your calendars!

Wildlife Science SeminarMarch 31
“Mercury Contamination from Gold Mining in Bats within Different Feeding Guilds in the Peruvian Amazon”
Anjali Kumar, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

April 7
“Amphibian Life History in the Arid Southwest”
Meryl Mims, Ph.D. Candidate, School of Aquatic & Fisheries Sciences

April 14
“I May Like the Suburbs After All: The Case of Cavity-Nesting Birds in the Greater Seattle Area”
Jorge Tomasevic, Ph.D. Candidate, Wildlife Science Program, School of Environmental and Forest Sciences

April 21
“Reducing the Hazards Powerlines Pose to Birds”
Melvin Walters, Puget Sound Energy

April 28
“A Grizzly Answer for Obesity”
Kevin Corbit, Senior Scientist, Amgen Inc., Seattle

May 5
“Are We Loving Sea Pandas to Death? The Relationship Between Boats and Noise in Endangered Killer Whale Habitat”
Juliana Houghton, MS Candidate, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences

May 12
“Post-release Movements, Survival and Landscape-Scale Resource Selection of Fishers Reintroduced into Olympic National Park”
Jeff Lewis, Ph.D. Defense, Wildlife Science Program, School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, UW; and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

May 19
“Laughter and Well-Being in Animals”
Jaak Panksepp, Baily Endowed Chair of Animal Well-Being Science and Professor, Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience, Washington State University

May 26
No seminar (Memorial Day)

June 2
“Aquatic Herbicides and Amphibians: Applying Phenology to Toxicity Testing”
Amy Yahnke, Ph.D. Defense, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences

Pileated Woodpeckers in Suburban Seattle?

This Friday, October 18, the Olympic Natural Resources Center (ONRC) in Forks, Wash., will be hosting the second presentation as part of its new monthly speaker series, “Evening Talks at ONRC.”

Jorge Tomasevic

Jorge Tomasevic

Each month, a graduate student or other regional expert will give a public talk to engage members of the Forks and surrounding communities in exciting research projects throughout the state. SEFS graduate student Laurel Peelle kicked off the speaker series on Saturday, September 21, to great success—and an enthusiastic round of questions afterward!

This next event, which will begin at the ONRC campus at 7 p.m., features Jorge Tomasevic for his talk, “A New Neighbor on the Block: Pileated Woodpeckers in Seattle’s Suburban Areas.”

Part of the Wildlife Science Group at SEFS—and currently working toward his Ph.D.—Tomasevic originally came to the United States as a Fulbright Fellow from Chile. From the cold forests of Patagonia to the arid desert of Atacama, from the native forests and struggling exotic pine plantations to the heights of an island in the Pacific Ocean or up high in the Andes, Tomasevic has participated in several research projects dealing with the ecology and conservation of forest birds and endangered species in Chile—and now in the Pacific Northwest.

“Most of us think of the Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) as a mature or even old-growth forest species, right?” says Tomasevic. “That’s why we use them as indicators of forest health. However, they are also using suburban areas in the Greater Seattle region. Why is this? How are they doing? Are they successful, or it is just the remains of a past population that are using what is left of the forest not taken over by housing development?”

Come out this Friday to learn more about what this woodpecker is doing in such an unusual environment!

“Evening Talks at ONRC” is open to the public and is supported by the Rosmond Forestry Education Fund endowment. For more information about the program, contact Ellen Matheny at ematheny@uw.edu or 360.374.4556.

About the Speaker Series
In addition to bringing speakers and interesting research out to ONRC, the speaker series also provides a great opportunity for graduate students to gain experience presenting their research to the public, and to a generally non-scientific audience. For participating speakers, ONRC will cover travel expenses and provide lodging for the night, as well as a stipend of $200. The specific days of the events are flexible, and there will be openings coming up for January, March and May. If you are interested in giving a talk or know someone who would be a great fit for this series, please contact Karl Wirsing!

Photo © Ross Furbush.