2016 Climate Change Video Awards: Announcing the Winners!

We hosted our second UW Climate Change Video Awards last Saturday, May 14, at Town Hall in Seattle, and it was quite a show!

From our emcee, stand-up economist Yoram Bauman, to our fantastic judges—Dean Lisa J. Graumlich, Paul D. Miller (aka DJ Spooky) and Ethan Steinman—to all of the students, families and friends who came out to watch, we couldn’t have asked for a more positive and inspiring evening. Also, one of the team members on the second-place winner for the undergraduate category, Ben Jensen, is a student in our Environmental Science and Resource Management program!

Yuna Shin, from Henry M. Jackson High School in Bothell, won first prize in the high school category—good for $5,000!

Yuna Shin, from Henry M. Jackson High School in Bothell, won first prize in the high school category—good for $5,000!

Hannah Letinich, our photographer for the show, captured a wonderful range of shots from the evening, so we encourage you to take a look at her gallery (download any images you’d like for free, but please give Hannah credit if you post or share them online anywhere). We’ll be working on getting the winning videos up online to share soon, as well, and in the meantime, below are this year’s finalists and winners.

A huge congratulations to all of them, and to everyone who submitted a video for this year’s contest. These students poured so much time and creativity into these films, and they give us tremendous hope for the future of environmental leadership.

High School

First Place: Yuna Shin, Henry M. Jackson High School, Bothell – $5,000
Second Place: Suraj Buddhavarapu, Naveen Sahi, Allison Tran and Vibha Vadlamani, Tesla STEM High School, Redmond – $1,000
Third Place: Luke Brodersen, Shorewood High School, Shoreline – $500

Other finalists: Julci Areza, Chloe Birney and Tanaya Sardesai from Redmond High School in Redmond, and Aria Ching, Jesselynn Noland, Emily Riley and Emily Weaver from Lynnwood High School in Bothell.

Undergraduate

First Place: Audrey Seda and Tommy Tang, Eastern Washington University and University of Washington – Bothell – $5,000
Second Place: Ben Jensen, Charles Johnson and Anthony Whitfield, University of Washington – $1,000
Third Place: Aaron Hecker, University of Washington – $500

Other finalists: Kennedy McGahan from Gonzaga University, and Malea Saul, Madeline Savage and Bethany Shepler from the University of Washington.

***

Special thanks to the Denman Endowment for Student Excellence in Forest Resources for funding the contest.

Photos © Hannah Letinich.

Aaron Hecker, who won third place in the undergraduate category.

Aaron Hecker, who won third place in the undergraduate category, is a student at the University of Washington.

2016 UW Climate Change Video Awards: Meet the Judges!

Last year, our first-ever UW Climate Change Video Contest was such a success that we decided we had to do it again. So this winter and spring, we once again challenged high school and undergraduate students in the state of Washington to grab a camera and show us what climate change means to them in three minutes or less. The submissions are in, the finalists reviewed and selected—and now the reel fun begins!

Join us at Town Hall on Saturday, May 14, from 7 to 9 p.m. for a public screening of the top five video entries in each category—high school and undergraduate—and see who takes home the grand prize of $5,000, as well as $1,000 for second and $500 for third. A renowned panel of judges will be on hand to announce the winners and discuss the student’s work, and it’s going to be a great show!

We hope you’ll join us in recognizing these incredibly talented students. The screening and award ceremony is free and open to the public, and doors open at 6 p.m. Register now!

Meet the Judges

2016_05_Yoram for blogYoram Bauman (Judge and emcee)
An environmental economist, writer and comedian, Yoram Bauman earned a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Washington in 2003 and now performs as the “world’s first and only stand-up economist.” He’s shared the stage with everyone from the late Robin Williams to Paul Krugman, and he has appeared in TIME Magazine and on PBS and NPR. He’s the founder and co-chair of Carbon Washington, a grassroots campaign to bring a revenue-neutral carbon tax (I-732) to Washington, and he is also the co-author of The Cartoon Introduction to Climate Change.

2016_05_DJ Spooky for blogPaul D. Miller, aka DJ Spooky
Paul D. Miller is a composer, multimedia artist and writer. He has created many works based on his travels to the Arctic and Antarctic, including multimedia stage works: “Arctic Rhythms,” “Check Your Math,” “Terra Nova: Sinfonia Antarctica”; art exhibition “Ice Music”; and The Book of Ice, a graphic book that explores the impact of climate change on Antarctica through the prism of digital media and contemporary music.

Some of his recent projects include “Heart of a River,” a composition that looks at water, cities, climate change and music in India, and “Heart of a Forest,” a symphony about forests and the future (premiering May 18 at Oregon State University). You can follow him on Twitter at @djspooky.

2016_05_Lisa Graumlich for blogDean Lisa Graumlich
Dr. Lisa J. Graumlich, Virginia and Prentice Bloedel Professor, is the inaugural dean of the College of the Environment at the University of Washington. As dean, she leads a college with unparalleled depth and breadth in environmental systems: from the forests to the seas, and from the depths of the Earth to the edges of the solar system. As a scholar, Graumlich pioneered the use of tree-ring data to understand long-term trends in climate, focusing on the mountains of western North America. She is actively engaged with a broad range of stakeholders to understand the impacts of climate change on wilderness and natural areas.

2016_05_Ethan for blogEthan Steinman
Ethan Steinman launched his career in film and television in 1995, and the Emmy-nominated filmmaker opened his Seattle-based media production company, Daltonic Films, in 2013. As a producer and director, he has worked on programming for a wide range of stations, including NBC, FOX, Comedy Central, Discovery Channel and A&E. During the past several years, he has produced original content for Al Jazeera English, FOX Sports, CNN, Adidas and Major League Soccer, and he directed two award-winning documentaries, including Glacial Balance, which explores the effects of climate change on Andean glaciers and the people who depend on them for survival.

And the 2015 UW Climate Change Video Contest Winners are…

The first-ever UW Climate Change Video Contest culminated with a smashing awards show at Town Hall last Friday, May 15. We screened the top 10 videos to a great crowd, and our panel of judges— Annie Leonard (also the emcee), Dean Lisa Graumlich, Paul D. Miller (aka DJ Spooky) and Randy Olson—provided some lively feedback and discussion. We’ll post the 10 finalists’ videos on our website shortly, as well as more photos and information about the students, so stay tuned!

And, now, for the moment you’ve all been waiting for—

HIGH SCHOOL CATEGORY

First Place
Leo Pfeifer and Meagen Tajalle
Ballard High School, Seattle, WA

Second Place
Teri Guo, Caeli MacLennan, Kevin Nakahara,
Ethan Perrin and Nivida Thomas
Tesla STEM High School, Redmond, WA

UNDERGRADUATE CATEGORY

First Place
Michael Moynihan and Sarra Tekola
University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Second Place
Erfan Dastournejad
Shoreline Community College, Shoreline, WA

Congratulations to all of our finalists and winners, and to all of the talented students who submitted so many fantastic videos!

UW Climate Change Video Awards: Meet the Judges!

This winter and spring, we challenged high school and undergraduate students in the state of Washington to grab a camera and show us what climate change means to them in three minutes or less for the first-ever UW Climate Change Video Contest. For months, the entries trickled in, but the pace really picked up during the last week, with a flood of submissions nearly crashing our system in the final hours!

And now the reel fun begins…

Join us at Town Hall on Friday, May 15, from 7 to 9 p.m. for a screening of the top 10 video entries, and see who snags the $5,000 grand prize—one for both the high school and college categories. A renowned panel of judges will be on hand to select the winners and discuss the students’ work.

It’s going to be a great show, and we hope you’ll join us in recognizing these incredibly talented students. The screening and award ceremony is free and open to the public, and doors open at 6:30 p.m. Register now!

Meet the Judges

Annie LeonardAnnie Leonard (Judge and emcee)
Annie Leonard was born and raised in Seattle and is now the executive director of Greenpeace USA. She is also the author and host of The Story of Stuff, an online film series that has been viewed more than 50 million times around the world.

She has visited more than 40 countries investigating the hidden environmental, social and health impacts of all the stuff in our lives, and she has worked for a number of environmental organizations, ranging from Ralph Nader’s office to Health Care Without Harm.

DJ SpookyPaul D. Miller, aka DJ Spooky
Paul D. Miller is a composer, multimedia artist and writer. He has created many works based on his travels to the Arctic and Antarctic, including multimedia stage works: “Arctic Rhythms,” “Check Your Math,” “Terra Nova: Sinfonia Antarctica”; art exhibition “Ice Music”; and The Book of Ice, a graphic book that explores the impact of climate change on Antarctica through the prism of digital media and contemporary music.

Miller’s film credits include “Rebirth of a Nation” (2007), a remixing of DW Griffith’s “Birth of a Nation”; original film score for “Downloaded” (2013), a musical documentary about the rise of NAPSTER; and original film score for “Traceable” (2014), a documentary that explores the sustainability of the fashion industry. National Geographic named Miller an Emerging Explorer (2014-2015), and he is currently touring in support of his new book, The Imaginary App.

Randy OlsonRandy Olson
Scientist-turned-filmmaker Randy Olson realized that after 15 years of telling stories OF science he had grown more interested in telling stories ABOUT science. Despite his Harvard Ph.D., four years of post-doctoral research in Australia and Florida, and years of diving around the world from the Great Barrier Reef to Antarctica, he tossed it all in, resigned from his tenured professorship at the University of New Hampshire, and moved to Hollywood to explore film as a medium for communicating science.

In addition to writing and directing his own feature films about major issues in science, Olson has worked with a variety of clients to assist them with the use of visual media in communicating science to the general public. Through his writings he has both related his journey, and continues his exploration into the role of storytelling in the mass communication of science.

Dean Lisa GraumlichDean Lisa J. Graumlich
Dr. Lisa J. Graumlich, Virginia and Prentice Bloedel Professor, is the inaugural dean of the College of the Environment at the University of Washington. As dean, she leads a college with unparalleled depth and breadth in environmental systems: from the forests to the seas, and from the depths of the Earth to the edges of the solar system. As a scholar, Graumlich pioneered the use of tree-ring data to understand long-term trends in climate, focusing on the mountains of western North America. She is actively engaged with a broad range of stakeholders to understand the impacts of climate change on wilderness and natural areas.