SEFS Seminar Series: Fall Schedule Announced!

If you’ve been pining for the sound of stirring voices and enthralled audiences, you’ll be excited to know the SEFS Seminar Series is booting up for the fall on Wednesday, September 24!

SEFS Seminar Schedule: Fall 2014We’ve lined up 10 weeks of fantastic talks, including presentations from two new faculty members—Professors Patrick Tobin and David Butman—as well as visiting speakers from CalPoly, Portland State University and other units on campus. Also, the final seminar will feature an alumni speaker, Stephen Hopley, to talk about his life and career in paper science and engineering.

Once again, we’re partnering with the Dead Elk Society to host a casual reception in the Forest Club Room following the seminar on November 5. Two other seminars will coincide with annual school-wide events, starting with the Salmon BBQ on October 1, and then the SEFS Holiday Party on December 3.

The seminars will be held on Wednesdays from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. in Anderson 223. (Students can enroll for credit under SEFS 529B; contact Michelle Trudeau for more information.)

So check out the full line-up below, and get ready for 10 weeks of terrific talks!

Week 1: September 24
Professor Patrick Tobin
“Allee effects and biological invasions: Exploiting an Achilles’ Heel in management strategies”

Week 2: October 1
Professor Rob Harrison
“The ‘hidden half’ of PNW forests: Understanding why our trees grow so fast”
* Salmon BBQ to follow in Anderson Hall courtyard

Week 3: October 8
Research Scientist Vane Kane
“Biophysical controls on forest structure and disturbance across landscapes”

Week 4: October 15
Professor Rebecca Neumann, Civil and Environmental Engineering
“Climate change and arsenic uptake by rice: Impact of elevated soil temperature on rhizosphere oxygen dynamics and arsenic concentrations in rice tissue”

Week 5: October 22
Professor Christian Torgersen
“The Fourth Paradigm and data-driven discovery in riverine science”

Week 6: October 29
Professor David Butman
“Fitting freshwater ecosystems into the boreal and arctic carbon cycles”

Week 7: November 5
Professor Vince Gallucci, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (and SEFS)
“Biodiversity of Arctic Ocean fauna as related to indigenous populations and climate change”
* Reception to follow in Forest Club Room

Week 8: November 12
Professor Sarah Bisbing, CalPoly
“Landscape influence on gene flow and connectivity across the range of Pinus contorta”

Week 9: November 19
Professor Todd Rosenstiel, Portland State University
“Canopies of change: Reconsidering bryophytes, biofuels and brown clouds in the PNW”

Week 10: December 3
Stephen M. Hopley, Alumni Speaker
“My life story as a paper science and engineering graduate”

SEFS Seminar Series: Spring 2014!

With the Spring Quarter now under way, we aren’t just excited for those first skin-tingling days in the 60s—like today—when the sunshine starts burning moon-sized holes in our motivation. We also can’t wait for the return of the SEFS Seminar Series, which kicks off tomorrow, April 1, at 3:30 p.m. in Anderson 223 (that’s right, Tuesdays instead of Wednesdays this quarter)!

We have to say, this quarter might feature the most diverse slate of speakers and topics yet, with talks from authors and artists mixed in with professors and agency professionals. So mark your calendars today and join us for as many Tuesdays as you can!

Also, we’ll have a casual reception in the Forest Club Room after the first seminar of each month—April 1, May 6 and June 3—and students can register for 2 course credits as ESRM 490C for undergrads or SEFS 550C for grads. (Contact Michelle Trudeau or Amanda Davis is you have any questions about registering.)

Spring 2014 SEFS Seminar SeriesApril 1
“The trouble with murrelets: Discovering and recovering a rare bird”
Maria Mudd Ruth
Author, Rare Bird
*Reception to follow in Forest Club Room

April 8
“More to crow about”
Professor John Marzluff, SEFS

April 15
“Climate change adaptation in forest ecosystems: Principles and paradigm shifts”
Dave Peterson, USFS

April 22
“Reforestation and the role of meadows in preserving biodiversity in China”
Professor Steve Harrell, SEFS/Anthropology

April 29
“Diversifying finance mechanisms for protected areas in the developing world”
Nabin Baral, SEFS

May 6
“Spatial optimization of forest roads, edges and harvest scheduling on WA DNR lands”
Professor Sándor Tóth, SEFS
*Reception to follow in Forest Club Room

May 13
“Burnscapes: An artist observes fire ecology”
Suze Woolf, artist

May 20
“Clear-cutting and even-age silviculture and its relevance today for public land management”
Angus Brody, WA DNR

May 27
“Assessing the impact of domestic wood”
Professor Ivan Eastin, SEFS

June 3
“Differential life stage niche modeling: Can we construct species fitness landscapes from SDMs?”
Tom Edwards, Utah State University
*Reception to follow in Forest Club Room

Winter SEFS Seminar Schedule Announced!

As soon as finals are done tomorrow, things are going to get eerily quiet around here for a couple weeks as folks scatter for the holiday break. But just about as soon as the calendar turns to 2014, we’ll start firing up the academic boilers once again, and that includes the return of the SEFS Seminar Series!

SEFS Seminar ScheduleFor the Winter Quarter, we’re moving the seminars back to Wednesdays, but the hour and place remain the same: 3:30-4:20 p.m. in Anderson 223. We’ll be hosting a casual reception after the first seminar of each month—January 8, February 5 and March 5—and all students, staff and faculty are welcome to attend.

We have a terrific line-up, starting on January 8 with Teodora Minkova from the Washington Department of Natural Resources, so mark your calendars and join us each Wednesday!

(Students: To receive course credit, you may enroll in ESRM 490F or SEFS 550C as a 2-credit course. Contact Michelle Trudeau or Amanda Davis with any questions.)

Week 1: January 8
Teodora Minkova, WA DNR: “Monitoring riparian and aquatic habitat in the Olympic Experimental State Forest—first results and research opportunities”

Week 2: January 15
Martin Nie, University of Montana: “Decision-making triggers, adaptive management, and natural resources law and planning”

Week 3: January 22
Bruce Lippke, SEFS: “Life-cycle analysis of green and conventional buildings”

Week 4: January 29
Steve Sillett, Humboldt State: “A tree-level approach to understanding growth potential of the six tallest species”

Week 5: February 5
Don McKenzie, U.S. Forest Service: “Climate change and wildfire: Why we need ecology”

Week 6: February 12           
Indroneil Ganguly, SEFS: “Modeling the role of carbon sequestration in Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA)”

Week 7: February 19
Marnie Route, University of North Texas: “The role of the plant microbiome in invasion ecology—a case study”

Week 8: February 26
Kathy Wolf, SEFS: “Ecosystem services in the city? The evidence for expanded definitions and values”

Week 9: March 5
Joe Mayo, Mahlum Architects: “Wood architecture: Innovation, technology and re-connecting with a culture of wood”

Week 10: March 12
Derek Churchill, SEFS: “Managing for resilience at multiple scales: applying landscape ecology principles to silviculture”

SEFS Seminar Series: Week 4 Preview

Increasing albedo through leaf pubescence has long been recognized as an effective morphological adaptation for plants in hot and dry environments, says Professor Soo-Hyung Kim. Will breeding crops for high albedo be an effective adaptation strategy for climate change?

Find out this Tuesday, October 22, in Week 4 of the SEFS Seminar Series when Professor Kim gives his talk, “Is Increasing Leaf Albedo an Effective Crop Improvement Strategy for Climate Change Adaptation?”

Soo-Hyung Kim

Encelia farinosa, which you’ll learn more about in Professor Kim’s talk!

Professor Kim received his Ph.D. in ecology, with an emphasis on agroecology, from the University of California at Davis, and his BS and MS degrees from the Department of Agronomy at Seoul National University in South Korea. He joined SEFS in September 2006 after working as a plant physiologist in the Crop Systems and Global Change Laboratory at Beltsville Agricultural Research Center in Maryland, where he investigated field crop responses to climate change.

Today, Kim’s research is centered on the physiology and ecology of plant responses to environmental stress. An important aspect of his research is to apply ecophysiological principles to modeling crop growth and yield for evaluating climate impacts and climate adaptation strategies in agroecosystems. He is also interested in examining the connections between crops, climate change and human health.

You’ll get a great look at some of that research in his talk tomorrow, so come out and join us!

The seminars are held on Tuesdays from 3:30-4:20 p.m. in Anderson 223, and all students, staff and faculty are encouraged to attend. Make sure to mark your calendars for the rest of the seminars this fall!

Photo © G. Wagner, calphotos.berkeley.edu.

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SEFS Seminar Series: Week 2 Preview

Fernando Resende

Professor Fernando Resende

After a great presentation and terrific turnout for Mary Ruckelshaus of the Natural Capital Project in Week 1 of the SEFS Seminar Series, we’re excited to build on that energy this Tuesday with Professor Fernando Resende!

In his talk tomorrow (Oct. 8), “Thermochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass into Fuels and Chemicals,” Resende will explain how we can make fuels and high-value products from wood, grass and agricultural residues—and how his work specifically uses high-temperature engineering processes.

The seminars are held on Tuesdays from 3:30-4:20 p.m. in Anderson 223, and all students, staff and faculty are encouraged to attend. Make sure to mark your calendars for the rest of the seminars this fall!

(A special thank you, as well, to the Dead Elk Society for their help organizing the reception after the seminar. The next reception is scheduled after Professor Stanley Asah’s talk on November 5.)

Photo © Fernando Resende.

SEFS Seminar Series: Fall Schedule Announced!

It’s been a long, quiet summer in Anderson Hall, but the start of Fall Quarter is just around the corner—which means the return of footsteps clomping through the hallways, rabid jostling for coffee in the kitchen, and a Forest Room revived from eerie dormancy. It also means the return of the SEFS Seminar Series beginning on Tuesday, October 1!

SEFS Seminar SeriesThe day and start time of the seminars is changing—they will now be held on Tuesdays from 3:30 to 4:20 p.m.—but you can still catch the action in Anderson 223 with 10 weeks of presentations from your colleagues and other experts in the field. (Graduate students and undergraduates can receive 2 credits: ESRM490F or SEFS550C).

This fall, the series includes four weeks devoted to aspects of alternative energy generation from forest products, including a three-week segment on forest residue-based biofuel research. Other topical areas include plant physiology, endophyte microbiology, fire ecology and human dimensions of fire management, and brown bear behavior along salmon-spawning streams in Alaska. In short, one heck of a line-up!

Kicking off the quarter will be Mary Ruckelshaus from Natural Capital Project with her talk, “Valuing Nature’s Benefits” (we’ll have more on her seminar next week). All students, staff and faculty are welcome to attend, so mark your calendars for the dates below and come out and spend an hour each week with your fellow colleagues and classmates!

Week 1: October 1
Mary Ruckelshaus, Natural Capital: “ Valuing Nature’s Benefits”

Week 2: October 8
Fernando Resende, SEFS: “Thermochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass into Fuels and Chemicals”

Week 3: October 15
Don McKenzie, U.S. Forest Service: “Climate Change, Wildfires and Why We Need Ecologists”

Week 4: October 22
Soo-Hyung Kim, SEFS: “Is Increasing Leaf Albedo an Effective Crop Improvement Strategy for Climate Change Adaptation?”

Week 5: October 29
Aaron Wirsing, SEFS: “Noninvasive Exploration of Brown Bear Behavior Along Salmon-Spawning Streams in the Wood River Lakes System, Alaska.”

Week 6: November 5
Stanley Asah, SEFS: “Inciting Organizational Ambidexterity in the Forest Service: Community-Agency Interactions, Personality, and Perceived Organizational Obstruction in Fire Management.”

Week 7: November 12
Team-led by Renata Bura, SEFS: “Bioconversion of Forest Residuals to Biofuels – Technical, Economic, and Life-Cycle Assessments”

Week 8: November 19
Team-led by Sandor Toth, SEFS: “Optimization and Economic Impacts of a Washington State Biofuels Industry Using Forest Residuals”

Week 9: November 26
Team-led by Clare Ryan, SEFS: “Social and Policy Implications of a Washington State Biofuels Industry Using Forest Residuals.”

Week 10: December 3     
Sharon Doty, SEFS: “Increasing Crop Growth and Biomass Production Sustainably Using Natural Endosymbionts of Poplar”

SEFS Seminar Series: Week 10 Preview!

Like the last bite of birthday cake, or the day after Christmas, you knew the good times had to end. Beg and plead as you might, the SEFS Seminar Series for the Spring Quarter could not go on forever. But we do have one last hurrah, one final romp through the fields of discovery, this Wednesday, June 5, at 3:30 p.m., when Michelle Trudeau takes the stage!

Trudeau, director of Student and Academic Services, will be exploring the long-term patterns and trajectory of SEFS enrollment. Are we on a rollercoaster or climbing a mountain? Why do enrollment figures change so much, especially with our undergraduate numbers? How and why have our programs evolved into what we offer today, and how do these changes relate to our enrollment? For these answers and many more, come join Trudeau and get a glimpse of where we stand in comparison to our peer institutions around the nation.

What: “SEFS Student Enrollment: Past, Future and National Trends”
When: Wednesday, June 5, 3:30-4:20 p.m.
Where: Anderson Hall, Room 223
Who’s Invited: It’s open to the public, and all faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend!

Come out and join your colleagues, and then head over to the Forest Club Room afterward for a casual reception from 4:30-5:30 p.m.

Undergraduate Enrollment Report

Undergraduate Enrollment Report, 1989 to present

SEFS Seminar Series: Week 8 Preview

SEFS Research Associate Van Kane studies ecology at large scales using airborne LiDAR (a portmanteau of “light” and “radar”). For this talk in Week 8 of the SEFS Seminar Series, he’ll describe his work looking at how fires are reshaping the structure of forests in Yosemite National Park with some unexpected results and implications for how forests should be restored!

What: “Landscape-scale effects of fire severity in Yosemite National Park from LiDAR and Landsat Data.”
When: Wednesday, May 22, 3:30-4:20 p.m.
Where: Anderson Hall, Room 223
Who’s Invited: It’s open to the public, and all faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend!

Come out and support your colleagues, and then head over to the Forest Club Room afterward for a casual reception from 4:30-5:30 p.m.

Also, mark your calendars for the two remaining talks this spring!

LiDAR image © Van Kane.

SEFS Seminar Series: Week 6 Preview!

What is it that makes Pacific silver fir and western hemlock shade-tolerant trees? And how is it that they can both out-compete Douglas-fir in the ‘twilight’ of the Olympic Peninsula? In Week 6 of the SEFS Seminar Series this Wednesday, Professor David Ford will describe the particular properties of photosynthesis of these species and discuss some general implications for how we measure and model photosynthesis.

So whether you’re on Team Edward or Team Jacob, one thing will be perfectly clear: There’s more competition on the Olympic Peninsula than just between werewolves and vampires!

What: “The dynamics of photosynthesis and its significance for modeling plant growth.”
When: Wednesday, May 8, 3:30-4:20 p.m.
Where: Anderson Hall, Room 223
Who’s Invited: It’s open to the public, and all faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend!

Come out and support your colleagues, and then head over to the Forest Club Room afterward for a casual reception from 4:30-5:30 p.m.

Also, mark your calendars for the remaining talks this spring!

Vampire clipart courtesy of David Ford.

SEFS Seminar Series: Week 5 Preview!

Forest HealthAs we turn a new leaf on the calendar this coming Wednesday, it’s fitting—or at least convenient as far this story is concerned—that we’ll also be turning your attention to the leaves (and roots, bark, branches, etc.) in our state’s forests for Week 5 of the SEFS Seminar Series!

For his talk, “Forest Health in Washington,” Professor Emeritus Bob Edmonds will explore concerns about the recent high rate of tree mortality and the potential impact on ecosystem services. Washington’s forests are impacted by insects, diseases, fire, animals, air pollution, drought, climate change and other factors. Introduced as well as native insect and disease problems are involved, and forest health is generally worse in eastern Washington than western Washington. Professor Edmonds’ talk, in turn, will cover the causes of forest health problems and what is being done to alleviate them.

When: Wednesday, May 1, 3:30-4:20 p.m.
Where: Anderson Hall, Room 223
Who’s Invited: It’s open to the public, and all faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend!

Come out and support your colleagues, and then head over to the Forest Club Room afterward for a casual reception from 4:30-5:30 p.m.

Also, mark your calendars for the remaining talks this spring!