SEFS Seminar Series: Week 2 Preview!

SEFS Seminar SeriesWant to know what snow in Oregon has to do with snakes in Costa Rica, HIV in Kenya, and green space in slums? Then come hear what a long strange road it’s been for Professor Susan Bolton as she talks about past, present and future in Week 2 of the SEFS Seminar Series, Wed., April 10!

Held on Wednesdays from 3:30-4:20 p.m. in Anderson 223, the seminars are open to the public, and all faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend.

After the seminar, join your colleagues over in the Forest Club Room for a casual reception from 4:30-5:30 p.m. We’ll have snacks, and this spring we’re offering selections from the Fremont Brewing Company (for those of age)!

Check out the rest of the spring schedule!

SEFS Seminar Series: Spring Quarter Schedule!

SEFS Seminar SeriesFeeling uninspired on Wednesday afternoons lately? Craving intellectual stimulation—that first shiver of excitement when a brave new idea courses through you? Well, crave idly no more, as the SEFS Seminar Series is back for the 2013 Spring Quarter!

Starting tomorrow, April 3, the series kicks off with a scorcher: “The Second Solution to Climate Change: Mobilizing Nature to Reach Target 350 ppm.” For this talk, we’re especially pleased to welcome Rhys Roth and Patrick Mazza from Climate Solutions, and Amanda Stanley from the Wilburforce Foundation.

Held on Wednesdays from 3:30-4:20 p.m. in Anderson 223, the seminars are open to the public, and all faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend! (Graduate Students will get 3 credits registering SEFS 550C).

After the seminar, join your colleagues over in the Forest Club Room for a casual reception from 4:30-6 p.m. We’ll have snacks, and this spring we’ll be offering selections from the Fremont Brewing Company (for those of age)!

Check out the rest of the spring schedule below:

April 10
“Connections Between Environmental Science and Health”
Professor Susan Bolton, SEFS

April 17
“Ecological Restoration of Tiritiri Matangi Island, New Zealand”
Mel Galbraith, Unitec Institute of Technology, New Zealand

April 24
“Connectivity for the 21st Century: Planning for Climate-Driven Shifts in Biota.”
Professor Josh Lawler, SEFS

May 1
“Forest Health in Washington”
Professor Emeritus Bob Edmonds, SEFS

May 8
“The Dynamics of Photosynthesis and its Significance for Modeling Plant Growth”
Professor David Ford, SEFS

May 15
“Conservation Biology of the Endangered Huon Tree Kangaroo in Papua New Guinea: A Community-based Approach”
Lisa Dabek, Woodland Park Zoo

May 22
“Landscape-scale Effects of Fire Severity in Yosemite National Park from LiDAR and Landsat Data”
Van Kane, SEFS

May 29
“Reconciliation—A Personal Journey of a Nez Perce Trying to Manage Nature”
Jaime Pinkham, Native Nations

June 5
“SEFS Student Enrollment: Past, Future and National Trends”
Michelle Trudeau, SEFS

SEFS Seminar Series: Week 9 Preview

SEFS Seminar SeriesDo you want to hear what it’s like to do research in some of the most beautiful and remote corners of the planet? Are you interested in conservation strategies for the Amur tiger or the Patagonian cypress? Or finding out why the blue whale is blue? Well, Professor Sándor Tóth says not to expect such treats from his presentation this Wednesday, March 13, in Week 9 of the SEFS Seminar Series, “Modeling Green-up Constraints in Spatial Forest Planning.”

“We will do math,” he says. “In particular, I will show you how conservation or resource management decisions can be optimized using simply mathematical expressions such as functions and inequalities. I will give you examples of why such highly abstract decision models can have a great impact on the ground. The coverage of the presentation will be much broader than what the title suggests.”

Professor Tóth often has tough questions for other presenters, so now’s your chance to return the favor! Plus, this Wednesday will be the final seminar for the Winter Quarter, so come out and send the series off in style.

The seminars are held in Anderson 223 on Wednesdays from 4 to 5 p.m., and are open to all faculty, staff and students. Stop by afterward for a reception in the Forest Room from 5 to 6:30 p.m.

SEFS Seminar Series: Week 8 Preview

SEFS Seminar SeriesYou’re in for a real treat this Wednesday with a SEFS Seminar Series doubleheader!

First, from 3 to 4 p.m.—an hour earlier than usual—we’re welcoming Dr. Anna Schoettle, a research plant ecophysiologist with the U.S. Forest Service. She is traveling all the way from the Rocky Mountain Research Station in Colorado to give her talk, “Managing for resilience: Sustaining mountain-top ecosystems in the presence of white pine blister rust,” so don’t miss this special opportunity!

Then, from 4 to 5 p.m., stay glued to your seats for Professor Jerry Franklin, who will follow with his talk, “Chaos in federal forest policy in the Pacific Northwest: The situation and a proposal.”

It’s an exciting line-up, so come to both if you can—and then join us afterward for a reception in the Forest Room from 5 to 6:30 p.m.!

NOTE: There will be no seminar next week on March 6, but the series will resume the following Wednesday, March 13, with Professor Sándor Toth for his talk, “Modeling green‐up constraints in spatial forest planning.”

SEFS Seminar Series: Week 7 Preview

“A sustainable way to keep the Emerald City green, even in the summertime…”

“Letting it all seep in…”

“Every flush you make …”

“Engineers and ecologists—working together…”

Sally Brown

Professor Sally Brown

No matter how you spin it, the next seminar topic is bound to whet your intellectual appetite! So let your curiosity steer you to Anderson 223 this Wednesday, February 20, when Professor Sally Brown presents in Week 7 of the SEFS Seminar Series, “Reintroducing the water cycle in urban areas.”

Also, next week—February 27—is a seminar doubleheader!

First up, from 3 to 4 p.m., Anna Schoettle will be in town to give her talk, “Managing for resilience: Sustaining mountaintop ecosystems in the presence of white pine blister rust.” (She had originally been scheduled for March 13, but a conflict pushed her up a week).

Then, from 4 to 5 p.m., Professor Jerry Franklin will follow with his talk, “Chaos in federal forest policy in PNW: The situation and a proposal.”

Make sure to mark the change on your calendars, and come to both if you can!

The seminars are held in Anderson 223 and are open to all faculty, staff and students. Check out the rest of the seminar schedule for the Winter Quarter, and join us each week for a reception in the Forest Room from 5 to 6:30 p.m.

Photo © Sally Brown.

SEFS Seminar Series: Week 5 Preview

Have you ever wondered if it pays to be a good environmental steward or socially responsible?

From a corporate perspective, does financial performance (profitability) increase when a company increases its environmental performance? Said another way, are profits and environmental stewardship positively correlated, siblings that get along well? Or do profits decrease—profits and environmental stewardship are negatively correlated, siblings that fight with one another? Or are profitability and environmental stewardship independent of one another—not correlated, or strangers?

And what about corporate social responsibility? Is financial performance positively, negatively or not correlated with increases in social responsibility performance?

Intrigued?

Join Professor Dorothy Paun this Wednesday, February 6, as she presents on her triple bottom line sustainability research in Week 5 of the SEFS Seminar Series: “Environmental Stewardship, Social Equity and Corporate Profitability: Siblings or Strangers?”

Professor Paun’s presentation will provide insights about these relationships and explore the potential benefits of a triple bottom line sustainability approach—one that strives to integrate, perhaps even balance, financial, environmental and social responsibility roles, practices and commitments.

Also joining the discussion will be Robb Schmitt, currently a SEFS M.S. and Foster Business School M.B.A. student, who will talk for 10 minutes about his experiences with the team of students who help collect data in SEFS 519 (spring quarter on Tuesday and Thursday evenings).

The seminars, held in Anderson 223 on Wednesdays from 4 to 5 p.m., are open to all faculty, staff and students. Check out the rest of the seminar schedule for the Winter Quarter, and join us each week for a reception in the Forest Room from 5 to 6:30 p.m.

Slide Image © Dorothy Paun.

SEFS Seminar Series: Week 4 Preview

Hypoxic ZoneA major federal effort quantifying the water quality impacts of cropland conservation practice investments was recently completed for the entire Mississippi-Atchafalaya River Basin (MARB). Additional scenarios of watershed-level targeted conservation practice investments were modeled, and the costs of their implementation were estimated.

Utilizing these unique data, Professor Sergey Rabotyagov will explore several questions about the Northern Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone, including whether additional conservation investments in the Upper Mississippi River Basin—the basin responsible for the majority of riverine nutrient delivery to the Gulf of Mexico—could cost-effectively reduce the areal extent of the hypoxic zone.

Join Professor Rabotyagov this Wednesday, January 30, for a deeper discussion in Week 4 of the SEFS Seminar Series, “Cost-effective Subwatershed Targeting of Agricultural Conservation Practices to address Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia.”

The seminars, held in Anderson 223 on Wednesdays from 4 to 5 p.m., are open to all faculty, staff and students. Check out the rest of the seminar schedule for the Winter Quarter, and join us each week for a reception in the Forest Room from 5 to 6:30 p.m.

Map of hypoxic zone © Sergey Rabotyagov.

SEFS Seminar Series: Week 3 Preview

China’s Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) saw a near tripling of population, from about 150 million to more than 400 million. There were no significant changes in technology or forms of energy used, but only more intensive use of existing technology and energy sources. That growth put a huge strain on natural resources, including water, soil and forests. What was the outcome for medium-term (decade-to-century scale) sustainability?

Join Professor Harrell this Wednesday, January 23, for a deeper discussion in Week 3 of the SEFS Seminar Series, “Suffer the Buffers: Population Growth and Resource Degradation in Pre-Modern China.”

The seminars, held in Anderson 223 on Wednesdays from 4 to 5 p.m., are open to all faculty, staff and students. Check out the rest of the seminar schedule for the Winter Quarter, and join us each week for a reception in the Forest Room from 5 to 6:30 p.m.

Photo © Courtesy of Stevan Harrell.  

SEFS Seminar Series: Week 2 Preview

Robert HarrisonAs we all know, trees grow really tall in the Pacific Northwest. But, though we have studied the aboveground world of forests intensely, much less is known about the “hidden half” of forests—the soil. A recent regional study of soil to depths of three to four meters shows there is a lot going on deep in soil, from storage of large amounts of carbon, to deep rooting that appears to help our trees survive the dry summers.

Join Professor Rob Harrison tomorrow, Wednesday, January 16, for a deeper discussion during his talk, “The really hidden half of the hidden half: The role of deep soil in forest ecosystem processes,” in Week 2 of the SEFS Seminar Series!

The seminars, held in Anderson 223 on Wednesdays from 4 to 5 p.m., are open to all faculty, staff and students. Check out the rest of the seminar schedule for the Winter Quarter, and join us each week for a reception in the Forest Room from 5 to 6:30 p.m.

Photo of deep soil study © Robert B. Harrison.

SEFS Seminar Series: Week 1 Preview

Fire RegrowthTomorrow afternoon, SEFS Director Tom DeLuca will kick off the Seminar Series (SEFS 550F) with the opening discussion topic, “Nitrogen dynamics in boreal ecosystems.”

Wildfires are a natural disturbance in boreal forest ecosystems. They transform plant communities, release carbon into the atmosphere, and also release approximately 200 to 400 kg of nitrogen per hectare from the forest environment. Given a 200-plus year fire return interval and a virtual lack of herbaceous or woody nitrogen-fixing plants, it was not clear how nitrogen is replenished to maintain the long-term productivity of these fire-maintained forest ecosystems. Our work, says Professor DeLuca, demonstrates that an association between cyanobacteria and the ubiquitous carpets of feather mosses (predominantly Pleurozium schreberi and Hylocomium splendens) provides the nitrogen that is essential to sustaining the structure and function of northern boreal forests.

Join us this Wednesday, January 9, from 4 to 5 p.m. in Anderson 223 to learn more about the nature and ecology of this dynamic system, and check out the rest of the seminar schedule for the Winter Quarter!

The seminars are open to all faculty, staff and students. Each week, a reception will follow in the Forest Room from 5 to 6:30 p.m.

Photo of charred log and regrowth in Sweden © Tom DeLuca.