Water Seminar: Spring 2015

Professor David Butman is leading the Water Seminar (ESRM 429) this spring, and you can catch the action on Tuesday mornings from 8:30 to 9:20 a.m. in Anderson 223. We apologize for sharing this schedule too late for you to see Professor Butman’s introduction, but there are plenty of great talks and speakers lined up for the rest of the quarter!

Week 1: March 31
“Overview: Land-use and riverine biogeochemistry from a carbon perspective”
Professor David Butman, SEFS and Civil and Environmental Engineering

Week 2: April 7
“What stable isotopes can tell us about inputs to freshwater ecosystems”
Professor Michael Brett, UW Civil and Environmental Engineering

Week 3: April 14
“Biological N2 fixation explains ancient sustained use of subarctic alluvial meadows”
SEFS Director Tom DeLuca

Week 4: April 21
“Does shoreline development impact herring in Puget Sound?”
Tessa Francis, lead ecosystem ecologist
Puget Sound Institute, UW Tacoma

Week 5: April 28
“Effects of land use on the predictability of land-atmosphere fluxes and moisture transport in the North American monsoon region”
Dr. Ted Bohn, School of Earth and Space Exploration
Arizona State University

Week 6: May 5
“Carbon storage in terrestrial systems inferred from riverine chemistry”
Dr. Erin Martin, The Evergreen State College

Week 7: May 12
“Global watershed management tools”
Professor Jeff Richey, UW School of Oceanography
Adjunct Professor, Quaternary Research Center, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Week 8: May 19
“Sediment and chemical loading from the Green River watershed to the Lower Duwamish Waterway Superfund site”
Kathleen Conn, hydrologist, USGS

Week 9: May 26
“Hama Hama Seafood Co.: What resource management and conservation means for a sustainable seafood business in Puget Sound”
Lissa James Monberg, Hama Hama Seafood Co.

Week 10: June 2
“Lake Washington Ship Canal and current water management operations”
Kenneth Brettmann, senior water manager, Western Washington
Water Management Section, Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District

Water Seminar: Winter 2015 Schedule

This quarter, the Environmental Science and Resource Management Seminar will focus on “Water, Soils and Watersheds.” Professor Darlene Zabowski, who his hosting the seminar, gave the first talk this past Tuesday—our apologies for the late notice—and the subjects cover everything from the Elwha Dam removal project to Martian soils.

The seminars are open to the public, and you can catch the action Tuesday mornings from 8:30 to 9:20 a.m. in Anderson Hall 223. Lots of SEFS representation on the slate, so check out the rest of the schedule below and bring your coffee for some terrific presentations!

Water Seminar_Winter 2015Week 1: January 6
“Introduction: Water, Soils and Watersheds”
Professor Darlene Zabowski, SEFS

Week 2: January 13
“Soil Organic Matter: from global cycle to local resource”
Jason James, SEFS

Week 3: January 20
“Soil, Water and Nutrient Management at the UW Student Farm”
Sarah Geurkink, SEFS

Week 4: January 27
“Water, Soils and Forests of the Pacific Northwest”
Kim Littke, SEFS

Week 5: February 3
“The Role of Trees in Modifying Water Chemistry”
Professor Emeritus Bob Edmonds, SEFS

Week 6: February 10
“The Elwha River Dam Removal and Restoration Project”
Joshua Chenoweth, National Park Service/Olympic National Park

Week 7: February 17
“Soil Map of Vancouver, BC: What are Soils Telling Us”
Maja Krzic, University of British Columbia, Land and Food Systems

Week 8: February 24
“Life in extreme environments: Martian Soils”
Ron Sletten, Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington

Week 9: March 3
“Climate Change and Soils of the Pacific Northwest”
Karen Bennett, USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region

Week 10: March 10
“Watersheds as a tool to study terrestrial ecosystem processes”
Helga Van Miegroet, Utah State University, Ecology Center

Water Seminar: Spring 2014

If you’re looking to soak up as much amazing knowledge as possible this spring, you’re in luck, as we have a veritable flood of seminars and guest talks lined up for your enjoyment. Among the offerings this quarter is the long-running Water Seminar (ESRM 429/SEFS529), which is held on Tuesday mornings from 8:30-9:30 a.m. in Mary Gates Hall, Room 389.

The talks are open to the public, so take a look at the schedule below and see which topics whet your intellectual appetite! (Our apologies for posting too late for you to make the first talk.)

Schedule

April 1
“Science, public policy and society: Experiences in river conservation and restoration”
Tom O’Keefe
Pacific Northwest Stewardship Director
American Whitewater Association

April 8           
“Assessing land use effects and regulatory effectiveness on streams in rural watersheds of King County, WA”
Gino Lucchetti
Environmental Scientist
King County

April 15
“Mythbusters: Challenging commonly held beliefs in stream restoration”
Jen O’Neal
Project Manager/Fish Biologist
TetraTech

April 22
“Pacific Northwest beavers are a lot like you: a little different”
Ben Dittbrenner
UW Ph.D. student

April 29
Film: History of Water
Terje Tvedt – Norwegian series

May 6
“Regional assessments of floodplains in the Puget Sound basin”
Chris Konrad
Research Hydrologist
USGS Tacoma

May 13
“Levee setbacks and removals in urban and rural rivers of King County”
Sarah McCarthy and Josh Latterell
Senior Ecologists, Green and White River Basins, River and Floodplain Management Section King County Water and Land Resources Division

May 20
“Fish passage through culverts: Considerations for design and evaluation”
Martin Fox
Fisheries Biologist
Muckleshoot Tribe

May 27
“River Restoration for a Changing Climate”
Tim Beechie
Research Scientist
Watershed Program, NOAA/NMFS

June 3
“Stream temperature: It’s not just another number”
Ashley Steel
Supervisory Statistician/Quantitative Ecologist
USFS, Seattle

The Water Seminar: Water, Soils and Watersheds

Water Seminar 2013We’re already four weeks into the Water Seminar and Environmental Science and Resource Management Seminar series (ESRM 429), but there are still six presentations remaining, starting this Tuesday, February 5! The focus this Winter Quarter is “Water, Soils and Watersheds,” and the presenters represent outside partners as well as several schools within the College of the Environment and broader university community.

The seminars are open to the public and are held Tuesday mornings from 8:30 to 9:20 a.m. in Anderson 223. So mark your calendars for the dates below!

(Contact SEFS Professor Darlene Zabowski or Lynn Khuat with questions about the seminars.)

February 5
How Watershed Complexity Promotes Sustainability of Freshwater Resources to People and Wildlife
Daniel Schindler, SAFS/Department of Biology

February 12
Serving Multiple Ends: Water and Urban Design
Nancy Rottle, Landscape Architecture

February 19
Sustained Productivity Along Subarctic River Systems Explained by Biological Nitrogen Fixation
Tom DeLuca, SEFS Director

February 26
What New Learning Tells Us About the Efficacy of Riparian Forest Practice Regulations
Kevin Ceder and Mark Teply, Cramer Fish Sciences

March 5
Tsunami Impacts Past and Present: Water Where It isn’t Wanted
Jody Bourgeois, Earth & Space Sciences

March 12
Brightwater: A Wastewater Treatment System for the Future
Stan Hummel, King County